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OK, so I've got my flour soaking for the banana bread recipe and for the yeast bread recipe.

 

I've been a bit intimidated by this cookbook simply because the ingrediants just aren't always pronounceable and I don't know where to buy them and since I can't even say the words I can't ask for them and lugging my cookbook around with 6 kids in tow just hasn't been working for me.

 

Where do you buy ingrediants like rapdura, piima culture starter and clarified butter?

 

Also some of the basic recipes that are foundational and used thorughout are confusing. Like inorder to make Whey, you have to know how to make piima milk, which needs you to make a starter culture, that needs a piima powder and that leaves me stranded in the grocery store again. I always seem to find a recipe that leads me on a scavenger hunt through the entire book only to get to the end and realize I can't begin.

 

S'plain it to me Lucy! I'm completely befuddled.

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I don't know if sour cream would work for creme fraiche; they are somewhat similar, but IDK if they're interchangeable. Check out cheesemaking.com for cultures.

 

Rapadura -- I can find this at my local grocery store in the health food aisle (might also be known as Sucanat), or at health food stores.

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Hi there,

 

I LOVE this book and have tried many of the recipes/methods in it. It feels like entering a while different way of life sometimes. Some of the things I have stuck with over the years some I just haven't had time to maintain.

 

I buy rapadura at the local health food store. It's just very unprocessed sugar. I really like it, but it is expensive.

 

I've never done the Pima culture, but I do make my own yogurt just using regular plain yogurt from the store. I use the whey that comes off of the yogurt for recipes that call for it.

I also have made sour cream, I just put a couple of tablespoons of the purest (least amount of ingredients) buttermilk I could find into a pint of cream and let it sit out on the counter until it got thick. Very easy and very yummy. Yes, you can substitute it for creme fraiche, especially if it doesn't get too sour.

 

The other things I have found very worthwhile are the meat/bone stocks and the fermented veggies (like cortido/sauerkraut).

 

Ghee/clarified butter is very easy to make. Just melt the butter and let it simmer a bit until it seperates. Skim off the top and pour out the yellow clear part, that's clarified. (personally, I never do this anymore, I just use butter for everything)

 

My best advice would be to pick one or two things and really get them down and then gradually add. I tried to do to much when I first got the book and got overwhelmed quickly. I've done much better using the gradual approach at this point.

 

Let me know if you have any more specific questions. I'd be happy to answer whatever I can.

 

Jen

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Hi there,

 

I LOVE this book and have tried many of the recipes/methods in it. It feels like entering a while different way of life sometimes. Some of the things I have stuck with over the years some I just haven't had time to maintain.

 

I buy rapadura at the local health food store. It's just very unprocessed sugar. I really like it, but it is expensive.

 

I've never done the Pima culture, but I do make my own yogurt just using regular plain yogurt from the store. I use the whey that comes off of the yogurt for recipes that call for it.

I also have made sour cream, I just put a couple of tablespoons of the purest (least amount of ingredients) buttermilk I could find into a pint of cream and let it sit out on the counter until it got thick. Very easy and very yummy. Yes, you can substitute it for creme fraiche, especially if it doesn't get too sour.

 

The other things I have found very worthwhile are the meat/bone stocks and the fermented veggies (like cortido/sauerkraut).

 

Ghee/clarified butter is very easy to make. Just melt the butter and let it simmer a bit until it seperates. Skim off the top and pour out the yellow clear part, that's clarified. (personally, I never do this anymore, I just use butter for everything)

 

My best advice would be to pick one or two things and really get them down and then gradually add. I tried to do to much when I first got the book and got overwhelmed quickly. I've done much better using the gradual approach at this point.

 

Let me know if you have any more specific questions. I'd be happy to answer whatever I can.

 

Jen

 

I'm :bigear: on this thread.

 

Jen, do you ferment your food using whey, or salt? And can you use the whey you collect from store-bought yogurt for fermenting? I've got a jar of cucumbers on my counter right now that I'm attempting to ferment with salt, but I've heard whey is more fool proof.

 

I've got my GAPS diet and Nourishing Traditions books that I've been studying...overwhelming, it is.

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Hi there,

 

I LOVE this book and have tried many of the recipes/methods in it. It feels like entering a while different way of life sometimes. Some of the things I have stuck with over the years some I just haven't had time to maintain.

 

I buy rapadura at the local health food store. It's just very unprocessed sugar. I really like it, but it is expensive.

 

I've never done the Pima culture, but I do make my own yogurt just using regular plain yogurt from the store. ]I use the whey that comes off of the yogurt for recipes that call for it How will I recognize what's whey? I have raw milk and store bought plain yoghurt and am ready to give this a whirl tomorrow. The yoghurt will be the thickest, right? The runny watery part is whey? Can you get whey more than once from youghurt or is it like when you skim the cream off the milk, once you do it's gone?

 

I also have made sour cream, I just put a couple of tablespoons of the purest (least amount of ingredients) buttermilk I could find into a pint of cream and let it sit out on the counter until it got thick. Very easy and very yummy. Yes, you can substitute it for creme fraiche, especially if it doesn't get too sour.

 

The other things I have found very worthwhile are the meat/bone stocks and the fermented veggies (like cortido/sauerkraut).

 

Ghee/clarified butter is very easy to make. Just melt the butter and let it simmer a bit until it seperates. Skim off the top and pour out the yellow clear part, that's clarified. (personally, I never do this anymore, I just use butter for everything)

 

My best advice would be to pick one or two things and really get them down and then gradually add. I tried to do to much when I first got the book and got overwhelmed quickly. I've done much better using the gradual approach at this point. What would you recommend starting with first?

 

Let me know if you have any more specific questions. I'd be happy to answer whatever I can.

Have you made any of the breads with the soaked in yoghurt flour? I've got a batch fermenting right now and will finish baking it tomorrow. I'm just curious as to the texture of this bread.

Jen

 

Thanks!

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Yes you can use the whey from storebought yogurt (plain of course). They whey is the watery part that is on top, yes you can get more after pouring some off, it continues to separate. Also, if you need more than what is right on top, put a cup or 2 of the yogurt in a towel of some sort and start squeezing, you can quite a bit this way. and then the yogurt that is left is thick, like cream cheese. Just scrape it off the towel and put it back in the fridge. And don't worry if a little yogurt is in your whey, it won't hurt the fermenting.

 

I have not done salt only fermenting. I always use whey and salt. My ferments have turned out great this way, so I hate messing with success:D

 

I have not done the yogurt bread since I first got the book years ago and honestly I don't remember how it turned out. So I'm sorry for not being a help with that. I do soak my bread dough overnight in general, just not with anything besides water.

 

If I had to pick one or two things to really get into the habit of, it would be the meat/bone stocks and the fermented veggies. I think healthwise they are so important and you get a lot of bang for your buck. Also, these are not purchaseable, whereas, I can buy good quality fermented dairy products easily. Also stocks make everything taste so yummy and we really love the fermented veggies, they add a lot of flavor.

 

HTH

Jen

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