Jump to content

Menu

Latin, Greek and Spanish (Yikes)


Homeschooling6
 Share

Recommended Posts

Joshua, started his Greek studies this year (using Elemental Greek). He wants to start Latin next year and continue with Greek but he also is interested in Spanish.

 

He has been interested in learning all of the above languages for years, but I just hadn't the energy before.

 

This year he started Greek, next year he will use Bob Jones full DVD program which comes with Spanish, but he really wants to get started with Latin.

 

I think three languages are too much in one year :001_huh: even though he is a real go-getter.

 

Should I just have him continue with Greek and start Spanish as well?

 

For those of you who have a child learning two languages or more ;) at the same time can you please share your experience and thoughts.

 

Thank you,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm - if you start Latin & Spanish make sure they use different methods to prevent confusion. I would probably have him choose one this year, and one next. Or else get him the Spanish course, and tell him he can do Latin outside school time?

 

How about GSWL if he really wants to do Latin. It's inexpensive and self explanatory (audio is on the author's website for free). And if he likes it, he should be old enough for the author's second course (Linney's Latin Class - uses a public domain book that you can buy hardcopy for under $15). So for under $35 you could do the equivalent of a first year highschool Latin course.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My DD started with Spanish, casually, almost from birth, wanted to learn Latin due to science terminology at age 5, and then, having seen Song School Greek, wanted to add Greek.

 

So far, it's worked for her, even though I get confused, and she loves the interconnections. This year, she's doing LfC A/Minimus, SSG, and Elementary Spanish. Next year, the plan is to do Spanish For Children, Cambridge Latin A (while reviewing the LfC A grammar/chants), and Hey, Andrew 2, mostly to keep from having multiple programs with the same format at once.

 

We do space out languages with other subjects between them and have one strong language and two weak languages a day-that is, we'll watch a video lesson from one language and do a fairly involved lesson, but then practice that lesson daily for the next 2 days, while doing the same for the other languages in rotation. We do 2 strong Spanish and Latin lessons and 1 strong Greek lesson a week, which, for the programs we're using now, keeps us about where the program expects us to be. We'll see how that works next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do space out languages with other subjects between them and have one strong language and two weak languages a day-that is, we'll watch a video lesson from one language and do a fairly involved lesson, but then practice that lesson daily for the next 2 days, while doing the same for the other languages in rotation. We do 2 strong Spanish and Latin lessons and 1 strong Greek lesson a week, which, for the programs we're using now, keeps us about where the program expects us to be. We'll see how that works next year.

 

Good idea. I might have to do something like this next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmm - if you start Latin & Spanish make sure they use different methods to prevent confusion. I would probably have him choose one this year, and one next. Or else get him the Spanish course, and tell him he can do Latin outside school time?

 

How about GSWL if he really wants to do Latin. It's inexpensive and self explanatory (audio is on the author's website for free). And if he likes it, he should be old enough for the author's second course (Linney's Latin Class - uses a public domain book that you can buy hardcopy for under $15). So for under $35 you could do the equivalent of a first year highschool Latin course.

 

Thanks, I'm going to look into this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say go for it! We are attempting it and still trying to figure out how to get into the swing of managing it so no advice but I always hear of other countries studing multiple languages simultaneously. Though we love classical langages I don't want to miss out on learning a modern language. At some point I want to add a second modern language but we'll see how this goes first.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I say go for it! We are attempting it and still trying to figure out how to get into the swing of managing it so no advice but I always hear of other countries studing multiple languages simultaneously. Though we love classical langages I don't want to miss out on learning a modern language. At some point I want to add a second modern language but we'll see how this goes first.

 

My son also wants to eventually learn French and German as well :w00t: but those are going to have to wait ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you start Latin first, you'll give him a real heads up for Spanish, not to mention all the other Romance languages. He could go from Latin to learning multiple languages quite easily.

You might like Visual Latin for him to get started. My DD started it yesterday and we were all glued to the screen. It's fantastic! And it's something you can do together or he could do on his own. Plus, it's very well priced and won't take a lot of his time. It's more grammar and mechanics focused with a fair amount of vocab, but we also wanted more vocab so I supplement with Latin's Not So Tough 2 this year which has much more vocab. There's still plenty with VL on it's own, it's just more focused on the difficult grammar of the language and making it easy to learn in a fun, light-hearted manner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dd started Latin in 3rd grade, French in 4th and German and Greek in 5th. She has rarely mixed up the languages, especially the classical and modern. Somehow the classical languages are studied and structured differently than the modern. I would go for it and see how it goes. If somebody had told me when my dd was in grade 2 that she would be studying 4 languages by grade 5, I would have said "No way!" but look what happened! :001_smile: I just let her take the lead and we went at the level she was capable of. We did have a few glitches (such as First Start French, which just did not work for her in grade 4) but we ironed them out as we went along. She's been dabbling in Spanish as well this year, so I guess that makes five! Yikes!

 

Once they get going with a few languages, adding more doesn't seem to be a problem. What becomes the problem is finding the time to fit them all in! :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My DD started with Spanish, casually, almost from birth, wanted to learn Latin due to science terminology at age 5, and then, having seen Song School Greek, wanted to add Greek.

 

So far, it's worked for her, even though I get confused, and she loves the interconnections. This year, she's doing LfC A/Minimus, SSG, and Elementary Spanish. Next year, the plan is to do Spanish For Children, Cambridge Latin A (while reviewing the LfC A grammar/chants), and Hey, Andrew 2, mostly to keep from having multiple programs with the same format at once.

 

We do space out languages with other subjects between them and have one strong language and two weak languages a day-that is, we'll watch a video lesson from one language and do a fairly involved lesson, but then practice that lesson daily for the next 2 days, while doing the same for the other languages in rotation. We do 2 strong Spanish and Latin lessons and 1 strong Greek lesson a week, which, for the programs we're using now, keeps us about where the program expects us to be. We'll see how that works next year.

 

 

I see Elementary Spanish on here a lot. What exactly is that? Do you have a link?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's a video curriculum by Northern Arizona University, designed originally for small schools that didn't have a Spanish teacher, so needed something Classroom teachers could teach. If you have Discovery Education, you can get it online, and download/print all the extra materials. There's enough for K-6, and then a separate middle school curriculum. Homeschool Buyers Co-op has a group buy price for Discovery Education.

 

It's not cheap-about $200/yr, but there's so much on there besides Spanish, it's worth it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...