Jump to content

Menu

Public school costs


Recommended Posts

I think for dd we probably spend about $300/year not including lunches since she would have to eat anyway, although it would undoubtedly cost less to feed her at home. I am including clothes because they must wear uniforms in public school here, and we probably spend at least $200 on clothes that we would not purchase otherwise. What I didn't include was cost of flagline which was another $300 for camp and costume, and the various clubs that all have t-shirts and cost another $15 each.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 118
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

When my dc were in ps we definately exceeded $1500 between the two of them. That includes: school clothes/shoes, lunches, classroom fees, field trips, shop fees, and costs for miscelaneous requirments (classroom projects, assingments, and such). That does not include money from lost wages for sick days, suspensions, teacher meetings, mandatory classroom volunteering and field trips.

 

Clothes and shoes are cheaper as there isn't a lot of wear and tear-ds goes through 1 pair of shoes + cheap flip flops in a year at home as opposed to 3 pairs of Nikes/Vans-the same with pants, shirts, and shorts. Same thing with DD.

 

Food is cheaper because we just eat what we have in the house-I don't have to buy special things that are easy make for breakfast and to transport in a lunch box or $3.00 per day for school lunches for ds and $5.00 per day for dd.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was commenting to dh about the guilt about buying curriculum thread.

I said as how I think we spent about $1500 last year for all 7 kids and I don't think we could send them to the local public school for that.

 

Dh disagrees.

 

I know it isn't in one big chunk at the start of the year, but I think public school parents are nickel and dimed all year long and if it's added up, I bet seven kids would easily reach $1500.

 

Opinions? Agree or disagree?

 

I've got one in school, and have to say I agree with your husband. Luke has chosen to play bass in orchestra. That is running us around 140 a month for lessons and rental, but we could have easily said no, we don't have the money and you need to choose a cheap elective like art or drama.

 

Other than that, we spent about $60 for school supplies at the beginning of the year and that's all. Luke doesn't give a hoot about clothes, so that hasn't cost us, but I guess if you have kids who are swayed by the latest fashions and labels, that could end up being expensive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our younger two are in ps for the first time this year and I have been surprised at how little the schools have asked for, honestly. When my oldest was in ps for K and first the lists were more extensive and brand specific.

 

We live in a small community and kids from all socioeconomic levels (including 20+ school age children living in an old hotel that was converted to a homeless shelter) attend the same schools so I think the district has become rather sensitive to that fact.

 

Their school supply lists were very reasonable and didn't really include anything that I wouldn't have had to buy for homeschooling anyway. There were somethings we had to purchase this year that I would expect to last for several like backpacks and lunch boxes. There is no pressure for the kids to have fancy name brand clothing and the school has a very good dress code that pretty much lines up with our own dress code for our kids so no special clothes to buy.

 

Eta: I did forget that DS will need $10 for a field trip in April. It's a rather spendy trip and mostly paid for with fundraisers, but the $10 will make up for the difference and again can be waived as needed for those who can't afford it.

 

As far as school fees my 7th grade DD had to have a PE uniform that cost $18, $15 for drama, $20 for art. Her school is apparently book rich because she has access to 3 copies of her math book (one for home, one for study hall, and one in class) and 2 lit books ( one at home and one at school). Fundraisers and other costs are optional (school hoodie, yearbook, and activity fees). 5th grade DS hasn't had any required fees. Those who are on free or reduced lunches get required fees waived or reduced and school supplies are provided by various agencies for the poor.

 

I know that high school can be quite a bit more expensive especially if a child is taking any AP courses or playing sports.

Edited by akmommy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We didn't spend a lot of money this year for our kids to go to public school.

We bought them some clothes and the school supplies and that's about it.

School fees aren't that much here(around 20 bucks a kid).

They did need certain color shorts/shirt for gym class(middle/high school).

Dd is in choir and needed a shirt for that, which was $7.

The schools do fundraisers also to help with the cost of somethings.

So far no other classes have asked for any money. And it doesn't cost money to take classes here.

 

Now ask me next year~Dd made the dance squad and I'm not looking forward to hearing how much I have to dish out for that. I know they do fundraisers and stuff to help the cost.

 

I would say it depends on if your kids are in certain classes that cost extra money(band, art, choir and so on).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are we counting the highly suggested volluntary donation to the district's non-profit? If so, it would be $450x7=$3150. If you're not counting that or any of the 5 available 8th grade trips ($2000-5000), we'll probably end up topping out around $300. That includes the various supplies we've needed for projects, pe clothes, and other such stuff. Btw, we're not doing any of the trips, but dis make a smaller donation to the NP, which provides the entire arts, PE and technology budget for the district.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The book fee thing just seems beyond the pale to me. I grew up in NC and GA and never heard of it there. I taught public school in VA and then taught in MD, though in private school, and I never heard of it there either. I've never heard of it here in DC, though I have almost no dealing with DCPS so I could be wrong on that count. From my understanding of school law from what I learned when I was doing my master's, it sounds illegal to me. But clearly I don't know what I'm talking about. I know schools are hurting for money, but good grief.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would count all of these. Especially as I have 5 dc playing 6 instruments.

 

What are your music costs now? Are they figured into your homeschooling costs?

 

If the fundraisers are a requirement, then I would count those. What happens if you don't do them?

 

Nothing. I've never felt pressured to participate.

 

I would count a portion if clothes.

Pending the school, the dress codes can be a royal PITA. No sports logos, no bulky winter wear, no whatever the heck is deemed gang wear (which can be just about anything), no religious or other slogans and so forth. And some do require uniforms too.

 

So if it means that they can't just grab any pair of jeans and shirt out of the closet, then I would consider that an added expense.

 

Here, my kids just grab anything out of the closet. (Wait. This assumes my kids hang anything up. Scratch that. They grab something out of their dresser drawers.) There is no dress code that eliminates anything my kids normally wear.

 

My kids range from preschool to high school. No clothes pressure here at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think people feel pressured to buy good presentable clothes. Kids get teased, bullied, etc if they show up in stuff that they might lounge around the house in. I'm not saying that is right, but it's really how things are. I love that I don't have to worry about it!

 

My public school kids have not experienced this here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Band for all 6 instruments is approximately $700 for the entire year. That's class, books, occasional repair, recital and dress clothes for them. There are game fees when the band kids have the chance to march for the local home school band - we don't do those tho bc not a one of us care about football, much less paying $7 a head to watch a game. This is paid up front at the start of each year and we do figure it into our curriculum expenses.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, unless you qualified for reduced fees, homeschooling is cheaper here.

 

Although our state constitution guarantees a 'free' education to students:

 

per student:

textbook rental $72

instructional materials $15

technology materials $10

activity trip transportation $15

supplemental enrollment (????) $50

co-curricular--like band (each) $50

sport (each) $50

and then there are parking fees, activity tickets ($25!), lunch fees, fundraisers, PTA donations, birthday treats, and school supplies

 

I priced out the school supplies last year, it was about $100-150/student.

 

I'm not sure what's 'free' about our local education system, except that I'm thankful that we've been "free" to not opt-in. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have 2 kids in public high school, and it's much cheaper than homeschooling. The most expensive thing we've had to buy for each of them is a graphing calculator, but we would have needed that even if we had continued to homeschool them. The uniforms were expensive initially, but now we just have to replace what wears out or is outgrown, so no more big chunks at one time. The only expensive field trip they've done was $55 each to see The Lion King last month. My dd17's art supplies can be expensive at times, but if she were homeschooled, we'd be paying much more for art classes. Their school doesn't do any fundraising, so that's not an issue. My kids went to the Homecoming dance last month; the tickets were $10 each. The local homeschool prom tickets are $65/$75/$85 depending on how early you buy them.

 

My kids aren't in band or school sports. But I don't think those programs cost more at their school than the homeschool sports or band that are available to us. The homeschool band costs $30 registration + $40/month. Homeschool basketball costs $325. I'm not sure how much volleyball costs, because it's not posted on the website.

Edited by LizzyBee
Link to comment
Share on other sites

The year we tried ps, I did feel like we were "nickel and dimed" to death. Snack fees, supply fees, a myriad of fundraisers, school pictures not once but twice a year . . . it seemed to never end. And we did spend more on dd's clothing that year. I am so glad to be homeschooling and at least get to choose how we spend our money!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my school district you would pay close to, if not over, $1500 for 7 kids. Although with that many you would probably qualify for the multiple student discount.

 

Reigstration fees alone are over $100 per student. The middle schools require each student to purchase a $30 calcator through the school because they want everyone to have the same model. Elementary kids have to purchase a recorder for music class ($6).

 

Field trips are at least $10 each. The money goes to help defray bus costs, entrance fees, etc.

 

There are fees associated with music programs (band, choir) and after school sports. These add another $50-100 per student.

 

Then there are the required dental exams that must be on file. If your student doesn't have one, he isn't allowed to attend classes. I know many families don't consider this an expense because they have dental insurance but many other families do not and it is required to attend school. There are also required eye exams and school physicals.

 

And then there are the fundraisers - the schools usually place some kind of goal for each student, say $35 . There are between 3-5 fundraisers a year (cookie dough, candy bars, ice cream social tickets). If you choose not to participate and 'buy' out that can easily run over $100-150.

 

Then the schools ask for food donations for parties and such. Since our district passed a "No homemade food" rule everything has to be purchased and that can be expensive. Have you priced 30 store bought cupcakes lately?

 

My DD,in public high school, has cost us way more than $1500 for the last three years. Cheerleading alone was over $350. Tennis was another $150. These are just upfront costs. It doesn't include what we paid for the t-shirts for special events. Like the $15 required from each tennis player to purchase a shirt & dye to tie-dye a t-shirt for the homecoming parade. Then there was the senior night t-shirt and the breast cancer awareness t-shirt. And the $20 needed for every away tournament because the team goes to a sit down restaurant (per the coaches preference). Same thing with cheerleading. They have to have 'special' shirts for every stinkin' occassion. White out night, breast cancer awareness night, senior night, team spirit day, Sweetheart Swirl, and on and on. DOn't even get me started on the "Hospitality Room" that the cheerleaders sponsor for the opposing teams squad. The girls are responsible for bringing food and drinks during each home game to share. Oh yeah - the tennis team did that, too.

 

She had to have a $130 graphing calculator for her advanced math classes. She also took a CNA course and by the time we paid for the books, uniform and supplies we had paid out over $200, for a 9 week class.

 

I could go on an on about the little costs that get thrown in for our school district. It is frustrating.

 

--

What was the main question again??????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There is no way you could get 7 kids through a school year here in ps! For example--I just have one in sports right now (will be two in two more weeks). Just this weekend alone, I paid for dd's share of the hotel for regional swimming. And my hotel room. And 5 meals on the road for two of us. And 8 hours of driving. And I finished the "spirit bags" for 14 girls,This is my beef with high school acitivities - why are spirit bags and t-shirts for every 'important' meet/game/match a requirement? We didn't do any of that when I was in high school and we survived just fine. probably dropping $50 in them. Plus the stuff for the coaches--another $40. And a t-shirt for dd.

 

:confused:

 

This comment is not directed at you personally, but society in general.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So dragon academy and any other who care to respond...

 

What happens if you refuse?

 

What if you decide your kids teeth are none of the school cotton picking business? Sorry, but what crap.

 

What if you just say point blank that no to the t-shirts and bags and all the other garbage?

 

Do they kick them off the team or refuse to let them be in classes?

 

I'm just cranky enough about this kind of flat out WASTE of my money, that I'd just say no and see where the chips land.:glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just curious, those of you who mention clothes as an expense because your kids wear play clothes at home--what kind of clothes do kids wear to school in your area?

 

School uniforms in PS around here... and the kids were bored to death with them. When we started homeschooling the kids were thrilled that they could wear their own clothes :)

 

($200 each for uniforms + $100 each for school supplies) x 4 kids = $1200... and that doesn't include field trips, fundraisers, etc.

Edited by babysparkler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I easily spent $700 for the twins for 7 months of Kindergarten. The school supply lists were nuts. We had to buy Crayola brand everything plus baby wipes, clorox wipes, dry erase markers, Kleenex, printer paper, etc, all name brands required. They constantly needed things for "special" projects. My kids have several nice outfits now but when they went to PS I had to buy outfits to be at school every day. I didn't send them in "play clothes" (at least what we term play clothes lol, no offense intended). I don't let my kids wear play clothes to the grocery store, or anywhere out of the house. I guess I was just raised that we should always look presentable out of the house because that is how people judge you, right or not. (I blame my parents lol.)

 

I didn't include gas costs either since I suppose it was my choice to drive them but in our rural area HS, MS and ES all ride the bus together. I didn't think it was great for my 5 year olds to spend 35 min on the bus with cussing 17 year olds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dulcimeramy

I don't know what schools act like these days when you refuse their endless demands for money, but I do know this:

 

If you put your kid in a middle class ps, but you buy no spirit gear, pay no fees, provide no fashionable clothing, neglect the kid's teeth, hair, winter gear or footwear, join no clubs, pay no dues, and generally provide no financial support to your kid's public school education,

 

the government may pick up the tab for the minimum and he may graduate.

 

However, the kid will grow up to share on a message board (or somewhere) how absolutely hellish his ps experience was.

 

I would choose poverty homeschooling over poverty public schooling unless the majority of the other students in the school were in a similar economic situation.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are also a lot of poor and struggling people i this economy. How can they afford this? Do you not get a locker if you can't pay? No books?

 

 

So dragon academy and any other who care to respond...

 

What happens if you refuse?

 

What if you decide your kids teeth are none of the school cotton picking business? Sorry, but what crap.

 

What if you just say point blank that no to the t-shirts and bags and all the other garbage?

 

Do they kick them off the team or refuse to let them be in classes?

 

I'm just cranky enough about this kind of flat out WASTE of my money, that I'd just say no and see where the chips land.:glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what schools act like these days when you refuse their endless demands for money, but I do know this:

 

If you put your kid in a middle class ps, but you buy no spirit gear, pay no fees, provide no fashionable clothing, neglect the kid's teeth, hair, winter gear or footwear, join no clubs, pay no dues, and generally provide no financial support to your kid's public school education,

 

the government may pick up the tab for the minimum and he may graduate.

 

However, the kid will grow up to share on a message board (or somewhere) how absolutely hellish his ps experience was.

 

I would choose poverty homeschooling over poverty public schooling unless the majority of the other students in the school were in a similar economic situation.

 

 

Ahhhh. That may well be very true. People always say my kids miss whatever they woukd get if they were in public school. But I know it's BS. Because I went to the local public schools here k thru 12. Not one music lesson, school play or sport or other arts or clubs were EVER an option for me bc my parents wouldn't pay for it and if I didn't catch the bus home, it meant walking home - which meant having activities that required ANY before/after school time did not happen up to and including the library if I could walk there.

 

That said, I loved reading and learning. I just absolutely HATED ever single thing about school. The boring classes, the mind numbing biding time until summer, and the classroom politics were worst. I don't remember wanting to do sports or plays. I remember thinking book club would be fun. Or boy scouts. :tongue_smilie: I didn't see any appeal to girl scouts tho.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My oldest is in public K this year and I've often said that if the school/PTO would just be up front in the beginning of the year and say, "We do not think you pay enough taxes to support our school already, so please open your checkbook and write a check for $500 payable to ____ we will leave you alone for the rest of the year." would be preferable to turning my 5 year old into a salesperson.

 

Wrapping paper, cookie dough, coupon books, penny drives and box tops. I am SO OVER IT!

 

ETA: The spirit wear money grubbing is the worst. I have paid $20 for a cheap, tacky tee-shirt that will never be worn anywhere other than school AND they bully the kids into bullying the parents to buy one b/c a PTO member comes around every Friday to hand out a pencil to every kid wearing "spirit-wear". I have never felt so intensely bad for poor children than I have this year seeing how they are marginalized and separated even beginning in Kindy b/c their parents cannot afford spirit wear so they don't get the crap "prize". It's sad.

Edited by BBG580
Link to comment
Share on other sites

People on free/red have it all free here..even dual enrolled classes. The district sets aside money for what social services and charity does not provide.

 

Blue collar has a tough time; generally the school nurse will give them what she can and discreetly get their fees waived however in these economic times, there may be not be enough resources.

 

:001_huh: I don't think this has anything to do with income. Even if I made enough money to afford it - that doesn't mean I am foolish enough to waste money on dumb stuff they don't need or benefit from. Isn't that a quick way to get ones self in a situation where they can't afford things they need more?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Dulcimeramy
Ahhhh. That may well be very true. People always say my kids miss whatever they woukd get if they were in public school. But I know it's BS. Because I went to the local public schools here k thru 12. Not one music lesson, school play or sport or other arts or clubs were EVER an option for me bc my parents wouldn't pay for it and if I didn't catch the bus home, it meant walking home - which meant having activities that required ANY before/after school time did not happen up to and including the library if I could walk there.

That said, I loved reading and learning. I just absolutely HATED ever single thing about school. The boring classes, the mind numbing biding time until summer, and the classroom politics were worst. I don't remember wanting to do sports or plays. I remember thinking book club would be fun. Or boy scouts. :tongue_smilie: I didn't see any appeal to girl scouts tho.

 

That was my experience, too. I wasn't bullied or tormented in school. I just nearly died of boredom. A little of the fun of the so-called ps experience that could have been bought with slightly better clothes or toys, or a few sports games or clubs, might have made all the difference!

 

I did participate in a few extras that occurred during school hours. I swear those were the only things that kept me from dropping out.

 

My own kids would be in school on the poverty plan. Their life is so, so much richer and varied out here in the real world! They are not bored and they don't feel too awfully deprived.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh! Our ballet school is forever selling shirts, sweats, yoga pants, jackets etc etc. It's already super-expensive, and there are many kids there on scholarship (it's private, nobody has to wear a sign...but )

 

 

 

ETA: The spirit wear money grubbing is the worst. I have paid $20 for a cheap, tacky tee-shirt that will never be worn anywhere other than school AND they bully the kids into bullying the parents to buy one b/c a PTO member comes around every Friday to hand out a pencil to every kid wearing "spirit-wear". I have never felt so intensely bad for poor children than I have this year seeing how they are marginalized and separated even beginning in Kindy b/c their parents cannot afford spirit wear so they don't get the crap "prize". It's sad.

Edited by LibraryLover
Link to comment
Share on other sites

ETA: The spirit wear money grubbing is the worst. I have paid $20 for a cheap, tacky tee-shirt that will never be worn anywhere other than school AND they bully the kids into bullying the parents to buy one b/c a PTO member comes around every Friday to hand out a pencil to every kid wearing "spirit-wear". I have never felt so intensely bad for poor children than I have this year seeing how they are marginalized and separated even beginning in Kindy b/c their parents cannot afford spirit wear so they don't get the crap "prize". It's sad.

 

 

I refuse to do any fundraising projects for the schools!!!!!

I also refuse to buy brand name anything (supplies, clothes, etc) if I don't want to.

 

I just send what supplies I send and anything else I just tell them it isn't going to happen. I also refuse some supplies if I know that my kids will not use them. The school's way of organization is overwhelming for some of my kids and I insist that the kids do it my way. I tell the teachers this and so far they haven't minded. Sometimes they come up with a possible compromise and I may give it a try.

 

For dental exams, vision exams, etc. I take my kids anyway so that hasn't been an issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So dragon academy and any other who care to respond...

 

What happens if you refuse?

 

What if you decide your kids teeth are none of the school cotton picking business? Sorry, but what crap.

 

What if you just say point blank that no to the t-shirts and bags and all the other garbage?

 

Do they kick them off the team or refuse to let them be in classes?

 

I'm just cranky enough about this kind of flat out WASTE of my money, that I'd just say no and see where the chips land.:glare:

 

 

I don't know what would happen, but I think that most parents go along just to go along and the smug little you-know-whats at the schools could use a good cage-rattling from a mom who doesn't just roll over every time they say "boo!"

 

If I had to send my kid to ps, you can bet I'd be the momma that makes them say "oh crap, she's not coming in, is she?"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would depend on your district and your philosophy.

 

Some people would not allow their girl to enroll in Trig or Foreign Language IV, even if all the dual enrollment and book fees were waived b/c of low income. Others find value in these courses....but cannot afford the expense, since there is no merit aid for high schoolers taking dual enrollment and the district doesn't always have money for those making just over the free/red cutoff.

 

Here, it has a lot to do with income. If you are on free/reduced lunch, you save a significant amt of money per child per year, especially once you are forced into dual enrollment. I don't know if you saw the other thread, but in my district a nonremedial senior will only have 2.5 classes..the remainder is study hall, band, or chorus. If they want to opt out of 5 study halls, they must dual enroll or take an AP class at their own expense if not on free/red or they

may take vo-tech for free and learn automotive, cooking or cutting hair. Or they can take more art and cooking courses on campus if there is room after the students who need those courses to fill their Diploma requirements are seated.

 

Oh I would enroll. But I would expect the school to cover book fees and I'd refuse otherwise. Would they kick them out?

as for that five hours of study hall. I'd sue. Dead serious. They are required to provide an education, not just a room to sit in. I'd be bloody furious if they said I had to pay them educate my kid or do study hall which equal no education offered. Scratch that. I would be bloody furious and stomp out to get my kid an education elsewhere.

 

To other poster about dental and vision.

 

Oh I do the dental and eye stuff.

 

That was not what I meant.

 

What I meant was it is none of the schools business, so I'd tell them to take a leap before giving our private medical information to them on a matter completely irrelevant to enrollment. Because I don't think we should have to give up privacy to get math classes.

 

I knew about immunizations, nut asking for dental and vision and a physical for all kids is just none of their business. They are a school not a clinic. Well some are. The ones in my district are also free clinics.:glare: I have nothing against free clinics, it's just not what a SCHOOL is for, imnsho.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know what would happen, but I think that most parents go along just to go along and the smug little you-know-whats at the schools could use a good cage-rattling from a mom who doesn't just roll over every time they say "boo!"

 

If I had to send my kid to ps, you can bet I'd be the momma that makes them say "oh crap, she's not coming in, is she?"

 

:D. Me too. I KNOW I was when my kids went over 10 years ago. Home schooling and time has not mellowed me in this regard.;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

See now. Paying for bus use does not bother me at all.

They are there to provide a free education, it's the parents job to get the child to and from school. Any bus provided is an added unnecessary convenience expense.

 

It doesn't bother me either. They couldn't pay me to stick my kids on a bus. All sorts of no good happens on the bus.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In our district, they withhold report cards, diplomas, and transcripts for kids whose parents don't pay.

 

If my kids enrolled in a class, completed the course, and was denied a diploma for outside class issues or because the school was denying them a full education - I can't see how one wouldn't have cause to sue. I'd expect to lose. But it still seems wrong and long over due for action. Sadly, it's probably those who can least afford suing that suffer this junk.

 

I can see withholding if they owe for damages or loss of school property (books or whatever). But withholding a diploma or transcript because of other unpaid fees seems very very wrong to me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it would depend on the ages of your kids. It seems that in elementary school kids pay for school supplies and field trips. In high school, we have found it to be much more expensive. Tech fees, lab fees, books, PE clothes, calculators, sports fees, travel fees, ect. With 3 or 4 of those kids in high school, I could image you hitting $1500.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, my dd5 is in public preK this year, in a brand new school in a well-off area.

 

So far these have been the fund-raisers... I can't even think of them all...

 

Daddy pizza night, coupon books, cookie dough, wrapping paper, Box Tops, used cell phones/printer cartridges, Chik-Fil-A night, local pizza joint night, parent auction, afterschool dance...

 

You can join the PTA on a basic level for $5, a higher level for $35 (you get your name on something), the highest level for $75 (get your name on a brick, this year only b/c the school is new).

 

Last semester every single week, my dd had something special that usually required buying something. Like silly sock day, bring an apple for A week, wear a plain white turtleneck for T'giving, bring a can of corn for stone soup, make some special project that requires something we don't have at home, etc. This has stopped after Christmas. I suspect someone complained.

 

She only has had one field trip and I think it only cost $6.

 

All parents bring *something* for school parties... they've had 2 so far with another this week.

 

Next year they will wear required uniforms.

 

I've spent waaaaaaaaaaay more than I would have to homeschool a preK child. WAY more. We plan to send her next year too (she has special needs) but could do it a lot cheaper at home.

 

That said, I love her teacher. Just had to throw that in. :D I get sick of the public school silliness though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Band for all 6 instruments is approximately $700 for the entire year. That's class, books, occasional repair, recital and dress clothes for them. There are game fees when the band kids have the chance to march for the local home school band - we don't do those tho bc not a one of us care about football, much less paying $7 a head to watch a game. This is paid up front at the start of each year and we do figure it into our curriculum expenses.

 

Orchestra is about $50 per year to participate (includes t-shirt, entry into solo andensemble contest, and a few other things). We rent our instrument, so that is more, but I assume you bought yours since you don't list it above, so that would not be a cost for you. We also pay $17 per week for a private lesson, but that is optional and many of the kids don't do this.

 

In addition, when we paid our fee (the $50 listed above) at the beginning of the year, there was the option to donate additional funds to cover kids who wanted to be in orchestra but couldn't afford the fee. I was thrilled to do that as opposed to participating in a fundraiser! Luke's school has a very wide range of socioeconomic situations, so there were probably plenty of folks contributing and plenty benefitting from this arrangement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In addition, when we paid our fee (the $50 listed above) at the beginning of the year, there was the option to donate additional funds to cover kids who wanted to be in orchestra but couldn't afford the fee. I was thrilled to do that as opposed to participating in a fundraiser! Luke's school has a very wide range of socioeconomic situations, so there were probably plenty of folks contributing and plenty benefitting from this arrangement.

 

I think that's a great idea.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Reading the posts on this thread make the $500-600 I've spent so far for ds#2 to go to PS-highschool seem like not much. We haven't seen the costs of participating on the school sailing team or field hockey team yet, but ds#2 was told hockey is the most expensive sport due to turf fees (& he wants to play for his club, his school, & the provincial teams! We may need to rethink his plans :001_huh: )

 

I guess that "free" education is just a myth in many countries now, not just New Zealand. :glare:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In our district, we only paid for school supplies during the elementary years.

 

In high school, we will pay for books. That will run about $600 initially, but the school has a buy back to help offset the cost. Families that cannot afford books are offered assistance.

 

Some activities are a deal because they're subsidized. For example, my son's fencing lessons are about $300 per year for as many sessions -- often one-on-ones with coaches -- as he wants. That's a bargain compared to some fencing clubs which can run into the thousands around here. And again, they offer assistance to those who need it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In both elementary and high school we pay for individual school supplies. In high school there are also fees if for doing a sport - uniforms are provided but shoes and any optional apparel are extra but except for shoes, they are optional. We don't have any book fees, locker fees or lab fees. We will have to pay for the AP test if she takes it, and PSAT/SAT fees but those are optional and we may have them for homeschoolers as well.

 

There were no fees for my dd to participate in cheerleading other than the shoes. There were no fees for her to do the school musical. We do pay a $75 fee per year in lieu of fund raisers (this is high school). Each class does do service projects, usually to benefit the local soup kitchen or food pantry, but it is the students themselves and not the parents (although some, like a dinner or brunch held at the school will have parents come to eat). The school even handles the transportation for many of these activities (the freshman spend a day working at the soup kitchen).

 

We do have fund raisers in elementary school - one right before Christmas that is usually wrapping paper or gift items and one right before Easter which is usually chocolates. I've participated in the Christmas one and completely bailed on the chocolate one.

 

We definitely don't have the huge amount of fees some people are talking about. Our elementary school did just eliminate courtesy busing - those who live within the two mile mark used to get busing, including kids who literally lived across the street from the school, due to no sidewalks. You can have it continued for $300/year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh I would enroll. But I would expect the school to cover book fees and I'd refuse otherwise. Would they kick them out?

as for that five hours of study hall. I'd sue. Dead serious. They are required to provide an education, not just a room to sit in. I'd be bloody furious if they said I had to pay them educate my kid or do study hall which equal no education offered. Scratch that. I would be bloody furious and stomp out to get my kid an education elsewhere.

 

What I meant was it is none of the schools business, so I'd tell them to take a leap before giving our private medical information to them on a matter completely irrelevant to enrollment. Because I don't think we should have to give up privacy to get math classes.

 

I knew about immunizations, nut asking for dental and vision and a physical for all kids is just none of their business.

 

We only had to tell our school about her physical/dental and vision if she took a sport. It is part of the sports physical paperwork but we have the option of her doing just the basic physical with the school nurse or having our doctor fill out a form. We actually just took her to CVS's Minute Clinic and had them fill out the form.

 

I still don't understand how a senior could end up with so few classes unless they were willing to pay a fee. Doesn't the state have minimum requirements that the schools have to offer? For example, NJ requires: 4 full years of English, 1 year of World History, 2 years of US History, 3 years of Math, 3 years of Science, 1 year Foreign Language, 1 year Fine or Performing arts, 1 year Practical arts, gym for 3/4 of each year enrolled, health/drivers ed for 1/4 of each year enrolled, 3 years worth of electives. Theoretically, kids could load up during early years and wind up with a very light senior year. Some do since they can leave campus once their classes are done to work. But with one study hall and one lunch period during the earlier years (which are needed since they will be used once or twice a week for labs), it's not that easy to wind up with more than 3 or 4 free periods (out of 8) by senior year. My oldest just did her senior year schedule last week. She has a "light" schedule in that she will have 3 "free" periods (one of which she loses for Anat & Physiology lab).

 

Is New York hurting so bad that the minimum required is really that minimal?

Edited by dottieanna29
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share


×
×
  • Create New...