Jump to content

Menu

When do you drop Latin?


Recommended Posts

My 12yo has been learning Latin since 3rd grade. He completed PL, started LC I, did all of LL 1 and the first 9 lessons of LL 2. He's now over half-way through LP 1. I had planned on having him finish LP 1 this year and then do LP 2 next year, in 8th grade, and possibly stop after that. But he really despises Latin. He did well with it through the end of LL 1, and started to really dislike Latin somewhere during LL 2. That's why I switched him to LP, but he still really hates it. I have him do 20 minutes a day and I'm nearby to help if he needs it. He still makes frequent mistakes, mostly with singular and plural endings and forgetting what tense to put verbs in. So, at what point do I say, "Okay, that's enough. You're done."?

 

BTW, he has started studying Spanish with his younger siblings this year using Getting Started With Spanish and is learning it easily. I plan on him starting in with high school Spanish in 8th grade, next year, which is part of the reason I'm considering dropping Latin at the end of this year.

 

So what do you all think? What would you do?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think latin is one of those things you can hand them. You have to sit down and do it with them. You might try that and see if it solves the problem. An inflected language is challenging, and even bright students don't necessarily have the logical process and maturity to tackle it independently. He may not be solid on things and need to go back a bit, which again you tell by working with him and reviewing, seeing where he stumbles.

 

When you stop is a judgment call and depends on whether the situation can improve, whether it's that important to you or negotiable. I dropped it with my dd, because it became clear it was never going to be a strong point for her or something she could do in a useful manner. We did PL, LC1, part of LC2, and were in LP1 when we finally stopped. The world does not end if you drop latin, and in fact lots of people do.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think latin is one of those things you can hand them. You have to sit down and do it with them. You might try that and see if it solves the problem. An inflected language is challenging, and even bright students don't necessarily have the logical process and maturity to tackle it independently. He may not be solid on things and need to go back a bit, which again you tell by working with him and reviewing, seeing where he stumbles.

 

When you stop is a judgment call and depends on whether the situation can improve, whether it's that important to you or negotiable. I dropped it with my dd, because it became clear it was never going to be a strong point for her or something she could do in a useful manner. We did PL, LC1, part of LC2, and were in LP1 when we finally stopped. The world does not end if you drop latin, and in fact lots of people do.

 

:iagree: Latin is a subject I do alongside my son.

 

When to stop? Depends upon your reasoning for studying Latin in the first place. My ds grumbles over math, but we don't stop because of that. We plan on continuing Latin through high school for many reasons, one of them being is that it forces him to stop and think through a process.

 

I agree the world would not end if you drop Latin, but I'd do it for YOUR reasons not just because it has become difficult.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree: Latin is a subject I do alongside my son.

 

When to stop? Depends upon your reasoning for studying Latin in the first place. My ds grumbles over math, but we don't stop because of that. We plan on continuing Latin through high school for many reasons, one of them being is that it forces him to stop and think through a process.

 

I agree the world would not end if you drop Latin, but I'd do it for YOUR reasons not just because it has become difficult.

:iagree:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

He did well with it through the end of LL 1, and started to really dislike Latin somewhere during LL 2.

 

Probably b/c that's when it started getting a little hard. ;) When you stop Latin just depends on your goals for your dc. My first stopped after lots of pre-high school Latin and 2 years of high school Latin. We both regretted it. My second went through Latin III and that is the minimum I'd like each of my dc to do. Toying with going further, but that's actually something I'm working through right now.

 

BTW, he has started studying Spanish with his younger siblings this year using Getting Started With Spanish and is learning it easily. I plan on him starting in with high school Spanish in 8th grade, next year, which is part of the reason I'm considering dropping Latin at the end of this year.

 

Yes, beginning Spanish will be easy compared to where he is in Latin. My dc study a living language through dual-enrollment their junior and senior years. The beauty of d/e is that 1 semester of foreign language equals a full year of high school. So, beginning in their junior year, they can still get the equivalent of 4 years of a living language. Also, they have more opportunity for communicating in the foreign language through an IRL class than a home or online course.

 

Again, no right or wrong. It all depends on your goals.

 

HTH,

Lisa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Aaah! I think LCII can make anyone dislike Latin. :banghead: My dd is about 60% of the way through it and neither of us are enjoying it anymore (but PL & LCI were fine). However I started doing Henle Latin myself this year and really liked what I found. Henle doesn't give you a million vocabulary words and hardly any translation practice like LCII (no, I'm not bitter :D ); they give you a few vocabulary words and LOTS of translation practice which actually helps you learn how Latin works and makes it easier to add as many words as you like later.

 

So I'm looking ahead in hopes of seeing a season of loving Latin again ...... We've experienced so many benefits from learning it that I don't want to give it up and (in spite of frustrations) my dd doesn't want to either.

 

In any case, you have my sympathy! :001_smile: I hope you find something that works for both of you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 12yo has been learning Latin since 3rd grade. He completed PL, started LC I, did all of LL 1 and the first 9 lessons of LL 2. He's now over half-way through LP 1. I had planned on having him finish LP 1 this year and then do LP 2 next year, in 8th grade, and possibly stop after that. But he really despises Latin. He did well with it through the end of LL 1, and started to really dislike Latin somewhere during LL 2. That's why I switched him to LP, but he still really hates it. I have him do 20 minutes a day and I'm nearby to help if he needs it. He still makes frequent mistakes, mostly with singular and plural endings and forgetting what tense to put verbs in. So, at what point do I say, "Okay, that's enough. You're done."?

 

BTW, he has started studying Spanish with his younger siblings this year using Getting Started With Spanish and is learning it easily. I plan on him starting in with high school Spanish in 8th grade, next year, which is part of the reason I'm considering dropping Latin at the end of this year.

 

So what do you all think? What would you do?

 

At that point they would have experienced reading literature in the original language and would have a chance to make a real decision over whether to continue. Our home ed. plan was always to continue languages we started: by the time the boys went to school, they were studying Chinese, Latin and French - Hobbes also dabbled in Greek, but it wasn't an official part of his curriculum.

 

I always used to do Latin with my boys: we did all the new grammar together and we also did the English-Latin translations orally, snuggled on the sofa. In LP1, we did the Latin-English orally too, only gradually moving to Calvin working more independently. Latin is hard and, for us, mummy-support was necessary.

 

Best wishes

 

Laura

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had all of my dc complete LCI and II by 8th grade. I made different decisions for each one after that.

 

dd1 - dropped Latin for high school. She took Spanish for 4 years of high school. Math was a huge obstacle for her, so she could not carry the work load of two languages. A local Spanish teacher was available, and I was starting to flounder in Latin myself. It seemed the best course for her.

 

dd2 - finished LC and took some online Latin from Memoria Press. She started excelling in Spanish and elected to drop Latin to focus on Spanish.

 

ds1 - dropped Latin for high school. Once again, a competent Spanish teacher was available. He was excelling in math and science. He loved computers. Something had to go; it was Latin. He'll graduate with 4 years of Spanish.

 

ds#2 - Loves Latin. He'll probably continue into high school. The problem will be getting a modern language on his transcript since many colleges require that. Our Spanish teacher won't be around when he hits high school. :crying:

 

ds #3 is dyslexic. I haven't even attempted Latin with him and don't know if I ever will. Spelling and reading remediation require all of our extra time.

 

dds #3 and #4 - I haven't started yet, but may do Prima Latina next year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I posted about it at the bottom of this discussion:

 

http://welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?p=2220519#poststop

 

For us it comes down to the economic principle of opportunity cost. We use that time in the day to do other things. Things that have had a MUCH greater impact than Latin ever did.

 

NO regrets. (And I'm one of those gals who tends to think of something to regret all of the time. ;)) Really no regrets in dropping Latin. I can't think of a single one. We should have never done it at all. It took up a lot of time (and $$) that could have been spent doing other things; it generated a lot of angst for me - angst that ended up being completely unnecessary.

 

Get the info, find what works for your family, follow your gut, and have peace with your decision.

Janice

 

Enjoy your little people

Enjoy your journey

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the responses. It's gone a lot better the last few days. I've been sitting with him, talking him through the exercises, and he's not frustrated by it. He'd still drop it if he had a choice, but he's handling it better. I still think that the mental exercise is valuable and will continue for the time being, but it's good to be reassured that we can drop it. Right now it doesn't take a lot of time (20 minutes a day, 4 days a week), nor does it cost anything as I'm working with programs that I already own.

 

Thanks again. It's good to hear different perspectives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son's attitude towards Latin totally changed when I got him *out* of LC, and LfC. We didn't try LP, but it looked much of the same.

Sorry, the program we chose probably doesn't apply to you, because it comes from France. But right from the start, the kids (grade 7) start reading material originally written in Latin, like Wheelock does. However it's not as demanding as Wheelock. My son is now in his second year with that program, and still enjoying Latin, much more than Spanish, I must say.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A big part of the reason we do Latin is for the mental exercise.

 

I've been sitting with him, talking him through the exercises, and he's not frustrated by it.

 

You mentioned he's having trouble with endings and tenses. Are you doing memory work with him on most Latin-study days? As in, having him memorize the various grammar forms that come up? I found that to REALLY help when it comes around to doing the translation exercises. It can be a pain to make up and get out the flashcards every day, but I have found it to be worth it. (I make the flashcards - it's far less frustrating than me trying to get my kids to make them - they can learn how to do that later!! All I really care about right now is the mental training - learning to make flashcards is easy in comparison)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We do vocabulary flashcards on most Latin-study days, but not so much drill work on the endings. He memorized them well with PL and LC years ago. His problem is remembering to check the verb to know what tense it should be in, or the noun to know which case it should be in, not so much remembering what the right ending is. Really his problem is just slowing down to think through the process. But maybe I should add in a bit of the chants for review once in a while. It certainly couldn't hurt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For us it comes down to the economic principle of opportunity cost. We use that time in the day to do other things. Things that have had a MUCH greater impact than Latin ever did.

 

NO regrets.

 

 

We dropped it somewhere in LC II. My oldest is dyslexic and we needed to prioritize our language learning. Extra time reading English and working on composition, spelling and grammar were necessary. We've continued on gently with Spanish and that's been our focus for the past two years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just wanted to tell you that I am planning on dropping Latin after my younger son is done with LC2, we plan on taking the plunge and doing Spanish. I want them to have the Latin background because it does help with vocabulary. My older son did part of Henle 1. I think that we are done with Latin.

 

I broke LC2 up into two years. My sons only do three days of Latin. I do sit down and do it alongside them. It is not an independent thing at all. My older son started with Rosetta Stone. Since my mother-in-law speaks only Spanish, it has motivated him to learn Spanish. So, we have decided to drop the Latin and continue with Spanish. I feel that the foundation that they learned in the lower grades is good. So, I stopped after 6th grade and they picked up Spanish in 7th grade.

 

Blessings in your homeschooling journey!

 

Sincerely,

Karen

http://www.homeschoolblogger.com/testimony

Link to comment
Share on other sites

His problem is remembering to check the verb to know what tense it should be in, or the noun to know which case it should be in, not so much remembering what the right ending is. Really his problem is just slowing down to think through the process.

 

Ah, that's a little different than what I thought. Yes, my 12yods does this sometimes, too. I think for him it's his age and getting distracted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...