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Geography that is not boring?


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Hmm. Most high school geography that I'm familiar with is text-based: Runkle and BJU for example. One of my dc did AP Human Geography with PA Homeschoolers in high school and enjoyed it. It still uses a text as a spine, but the teacher added in lots of videos and assignment, as well as a discussion board that pepped it up a bit.

 

We usually concentrate on geography for a year in 7th/8th and there are many ways to make it fun. It takes some work, though, pulling together living books, projects, field trips, a geography fair, Geobee and mapping projects. I haven't seen a one-stop shop yet for a solid, interesting and fun geography study for older students. (I've used Trail Guide for younger students and it's billed for older students, but doesn't stretch to high school level IMHO.)

 

HTH,

Lisa

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Hmm. Most high school geography that I'm familiar with is text-based: Runkle and BJU for example. One of my dc did AP Human Geography with PA Homeschoolers in high school and enjoyed it. It still uses a text as a spine, but the teacher added in lots of videos and assignment, as well as a discussion board that pepped it up a bit.

 

We usually concentrate on geography for a year in 7th/8th and there are many ways to make it fun. It takes some work, though, pulling together living books, projects, field trips, a geography fair, Geobee and mapping projects. I haven't seen a one-stop shop yet for a solid, interesting and fun geography study for older students. (I've used Trail Guide for younger students and it's billed for older students, but doesn't stretch to high school level IMHO.)

 

HTH,

Lisa

 

Lisa,

What text did the AP Human Geography use, if you don't mind me asking? What do you use when you study it in 7th/8th with your own children? Would you care to share what texts, living books or mapping projects you've incorporated to make it fun?

 

Thanks for your insight!

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Lisa,

What text did the AP Human Geography use, if you don't mind me asking? What do you use when you study it in 7th/8th with your own children? Would you care to share what texts, living books or mapping projects you've incorporated to make it fun?

 

Thanks for your insight!

 

The AP Human Geography course (through PAH) used Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities, 9th ed. By Fellmann, Getis, & Getis and Human Geography in Action, 4th ed. By Kuby, Harner, & Gober. It's a great class for a 9th grader b/c it's one of the easier APs.

 

I wish I had my geography syllabus, but it's on a hard drive that isn't working at this point. :/ I'll try to walk you through a bit of what we've used. Two of my boys were geography nuts and we've collected lots of books over the years. I usually start with Mapping the World by Heart and go through the first few lessons on map distortion and drawing contour maps (which show elevation). MTWBH has great maps and is based on the wonderful concept of being able to draw a world map from memory. But there are no real lessons! The teacher has to come up with everything. :glare:

 

So, at that point, we begin to use Runkle's student text, living books from the library and YWAM biographies to flesh out our geography studies. We study continent by continent, memorizing all countries and major physical landmarks. The kids first fill in a blank continent map, then do some hands-on activities, read books, watch films, and memorize the countries and physical features for each continent. The test for each continent is a blank continent map, with an outline of all countries. They name each country and physical feature from memory.

 

Some of the projects have included: salt dough maps, cookie dough maps, transparency maps, major world landmarks map, a highest/biggest/longest worksheet, making a presentation for a geography fair (with other families), classic country reports, interviewing immigrants/international missionaries about their country's culture, cooking, studying for and participating in the Geobee, and field trips to museums or the Festival of Nations. Geography Matters has some wonderful hands-on recipes and projects.

 

At the end of our studies, we take about 3 weeks to draw a world map from memory a la MTWBH. You can google and find several examples of classes or families that have done it or tweaked it.

 

HTH! I love taking a year off of formal history study and doing geography instead. I'll probably get two more passes through MTWBH with my younger kids. :001_smile:

 

Lisa

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Thank you SO much for all of the info, Lisa! You've given me a lot to think about and ponder! To be honest, I will probably not be able to sleep because I'm going to lay awake and think of all the possibilities of what we could cover, should cover, etc. I'm a little overwhelmed with the idea of high school on the horizon right now (my daughter will be in 9th next year!), but I do appreciate all the insight you shared! I'm sure I'll have lots more questions in the near future!

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Thank you SO much for all of the info, Lisa! You've given me a lot to think about and ponder! To be honest, I will probably not be able to sleep because I'm going to lay awake and think of all the possibilities of what we could cover, should cover, etc. I'm a little overwhelmed with the idea of high school on the horizon right now (my daughter will be in 9th next year!), but I do appreciate all the insight you shared! I'm sure I'll have lots more questions in the near future!

 

Well, the *problem* with geography is that it can be taken in so many directions. Do you concentrate on memorizing names and places? Or study the culture/people groups of different areas? Then there is earth science geography. I wanted my kids to know where countries were and major physical landmarks. My oldest went on to study cultural geography in AP Human Geography. It's a fun subject and most good libraries will have oodles of beautiful full-color books on each country.

 

Enjoy!

Lisa

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  • 2 weeks later...
It's not a program, but Material World and Hungry Planet are interesting books that caused my kids to spend some time with the globe.

We have loved these and books similar to these. This is how we have studied geography so far and the kids beg for it.

 

I love Harmony Art Mom's geography plan.

This is lovely. Thank you for sharing. :)

 

I would really like to find an engaging and user-friendly geography workbook or program that concentrates on continents, countries, and capital cities. I'm not interested in contour lines, maps, and all the other details that I and some others may find boring, if you KWIM. Is there such a thing? And sorry for hijacking this thread.

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