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Anyone NOT like MEP?


MangoMama
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I am basically looking for reasons to use it or not. :glare:

 

My son has used Singapore and Miquon together, but it was too much writing for him. So then I switched to MUS. We haven't been using it for too long, but I am thinking of switching again because he seems too engrossed in playing with the blocks that he's not "getting" the math part of it. He is very mathematically minded and a visual-spatial learner. He is also dyslexic and has a plethora of other "issues".

 

I have been thinking about purchasing RightStart B for him, but I'm nervous about plunking down a lot of money again just to have it be a bust. So I thought I'd look at MEP first. The fact that I would have to do all the printing would not be a problem for me.

 

Thanks! :001_smile:

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What kind of learner is your child (if you know)? I think he's basically a visual leaner.

Is your child mathematically minded? Yes, very much so

Is your child wiggly / writing phobic or does (s)he love workbooks? He doesn't like writing.

Does your child like puzzles? Yes

Why don't you like MEP? We like it

 

:001_smile:

 

We do like it. I clicked on this thread because I was thinking MEP was actually the grammar thing every one loves that I can't think of the name of right now but I've been thinking about getting for next year and I wanted to see what people who didn't like it thought. Then I realized what MEP was and I decided to answer. :)

 

We use Singapore mostly and MEP as a supplement. For the most part we like it. For ds, I still will sometimes offer to do the writing for him so that he will be willing to do more math.

 

ETA: I bought just the Right Start Math games to use and have a bunch of other Math games. We do those frequently also, which helps keep it from being all workbooks.

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I only like MEP if I do the entire program. If you aren't teaching the lessons as they have them written then your just doing a bunch of worksheets that, in my opinion, often don't make sense unless you've taught the lesson.

 

The lessons that you are supposed to teach are the meat of this program not the worksheets. In fact we often didn't even use the worksheet at all, opting to do our work on a whiteboard.

 

I'm no math expert but I think this program can be adapted to any type of learner. If you read the lessons you will see that they try to hit on activities appropriate to each learning style. They encourage the use of manipulatives, even suggesting that the dc gather there own counters. They use visual aids by the use of posters and work on the board. The teacher of coarse gives the lesson orally and they encourage a verbal dialog between the teacher and the student. Those are just a few examples. You can of coarse beef up one area over another if you need to. If you have a wiggly child have him come up to the whiteboard to do the practice, or jump up from his seat everytime he needs to call out an answer. If you have a workbook lover give him the practice on the worksheet.

 

Now that being said, I haven't been using it lately because of the time involved. If you teach the lessons it can be time intensive. If I did the entire lesson and practice it would usually take about 45 minutes (my dd is slow though and wants to discuss everything ad naseum...I have read of some that say they can be done in about 25 minutes). I didn't have a problem with that for the most part and will return to MEP but right now my 2yo is terrorizing the house and I'm having some behavioral\learning issues with one of my other dc, so we had to switch to something less intensive.

 

I will answer your specific questions.

 

What kind of learner is your child (if you know)? Auditory\kinesthetic.

Is your child mathematically minded?She likes math but is more language orientated.

Is your child wiggly / writing phobic or does (s)he love workbooks?Wiggly(what 7 yr.old isn't) but does like to write until her hand gets tired. Sometimes wants a workbook but if given a choice would rather be learning through dialog and doing.

Does your child like puzzles?Yes, but does not have the drive to get to the answer no matter how long it takes. If a puzzle makes her feel dumb she will give up quickly.

 

I hope some of that will help you in your decision!

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We've been using MEP for 3 years. We LOVED it with the lesson plans and suddenly this year we lost the passion for the program and until a couple days ago I didn't know why...and it's because I cut out all the lesson plan reading and cut directly to the worksheets..and frankly its because we just were so CRUNCHED for time on getting everything done. With 2 kids doing the MEP math both at different grade levels and a 23m old very curious toddler I was finding it REALLY hard to find the time to invest in the lesson plan reading and activities which is the MAIN reason we stuck with MEP. Because it's FUN, engaging and more of a "thinker math"....but I've finally had a sad reality that I'm getting stretched so thin that I'm beginning to show it through my teachings and to me it's not worth that...so we're switching to Math Mammoth next year BUT we'll complete this year with MEP. Even though I don't want to switch because MEP is FREE and have to go to something I'll not only have to pay for but also pay the cost of printing it....MM seems more like what we're gonna be able to ENJOY into our classroom. Now I'll say if ds wasn't a toddler and was more into sitting and occupying himself for even 20min..then I'd KEEP MEP! But it's just not something that's gonna happen for another couple years :001_huh:

 

So farewell MEP, that's a sad farewell btw! Not something I'm embracing 100% yet...but letting the reality sink in. The kids love MEP, I love it...but you HAVE to do the lesson plans!! And those require ATLEAST 45min and for me that's x2 just for math!

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If dyslexia/writing is the main issue, I would use what you have and just do more of it orally and scribe for him.

 

I have a VSL who is late to read (strongly suspect dyslexia, but not dx). I like MEP for him, but run into the same roadblocks. If it's too much reading/writing with Sing/Mq, it's going to be the same story with MEP. MEP fits in many other ways, the quick pace of the lessons and the conceptual work esp.

 

It's *very* difficult for him to read the problem, do the math, write the problem. He can do the math if I read it to him and scribe for him, easy-peasy. He does well if I read it to him and he writes for short periods of time...he does well if he reads the problem to me and I scribe for him for a short period of time. I try to make sure we do a bit of all of the above every day. I don't want to burn him out or spoil him...it's a fine line.

 

I finally came to the conclusion that there is no math program that is perfect for my ds. I have one program that feeds his strengths and another that works out his weaknesses. It's baby-steps helping him to show on paper what he can do in his head. The result: he hates morning math and loves afternoon math.:tongue_smilie::lol:

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What kind of learner is your child (if you know)?

Is your child mathematically minded?

Is your child wiggly / writing phobic or does (s)he love workbooks?

Does your child like puzzles?

Why don't you like MEP?

 

:001_smile:

 

I am in Year 1 with my 6 year old. I really like it.

 

My son likes dice games and things like that, but I wouldn't call him particularly mathy. He's VERY average academically.

 

He is super wiggly. We kept things very short at first (15 minutes) and now I am steadily increasing the time we are spending on math. He only started writing recently and is not a strong writer. He doesn't complain about the amount of writing, but occasionally I worry its too much and I will take over the writing and have him dictate.

 

I think MEP would work well with just about any child. It is multi-sensory and really mixes things up. BUT I think it might not work well if the parent was not confident with math. A friend of mine is having a hard time with it. She said it is making perfect sense to her child, but that she has her husband doing it at nighttime because she doesn't always 'get it'. (He's in year 2 or 3.) It is fairly teacher intensive, so it makes sense to me that if the teacher is not confident it might be a problem. Hopefully some parents who are not strong in math will say I'm wrong and that it is working fine for them!

 

My son does like puzzles, and I try to foster the idea that all math is a puzzle.

Elena

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Just read some of the other answers and wanted to agree with pps that yes, MEP is very time intensive and I can see not liking it for that reason. For me, I decided that math was one of or the most important subjects for us, so I don't mind spending the time. (Although, I have cut out other things to make time for it. I've decided to do a few things well rather than struggle to add a lot of things in.) Also, although it takes a lot of time, I don't have to prepare at all ahead of time. I find the lesson plans easy to follow. I just open it up each day and go, which is important to me. (I don't do well with planning ahead!)

 

But if you are looking for a curriculum where the child is working more independently, or one that does not take a lot of time, then MEP might really frustrate you!

Elena

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I looked at reception and 1st. Tried a lesson or two with DD. Hated it. FWIW I don't think DD is hugely mathy but she is fairly advanced. Reception was too simple and 1st had too much writing for her (I think she was around 3.5 when we tried it). She seems to be an auditory/kinasthetic learner.

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We've been using MEP for 3 years. We LOVED it with the lesson plans and suddenly this year we lost the passion for the program and until a couple days ago I didn't know why...and it's because I cut out all the lesson plan reading and cut directly to the worksheets..and frankly its because we just were so CRUNCHED for time on getting everything done. With 2 kids doing the MEP math both at different grade levels and a 23m old very curious toddler I was finding it REALLY hard to find the time to invest in the lesson plan reading and activities which is the MAIN reason we stuck with MEP. Because it's FUN, engaging and more of a "thinker math"....but I've finally had a sad reality that I'm getting stretched so thin that I'm beginning to show it through my teachings and to me it's not worth that...so we're switching to Math Mammoth next year BUT we'll complete this year with MEP. Even though I don't want to switch because MEP is FREE and have to go to something I'll not only have to pay for but also pay the cost of printing it....MM seems more like what we're gonna be able to ENJOY into our classroom. Now I'll say if ds wasn't a toddler and was more into sitting and occupying himself for even 20min..then I'd KEEP MEP! But it's just not something that's gonna happen for another couple years :001_huh:

 

So farewell MEP, that's a sad farewell btw! Not something I'm embracing 100% yet...but letting the reality sink in. The kids love MEP, I love it...but you HAVE to do the lesson plans!! And those require ATLEAST 45min and for me that's x2 just for math!

 

After reading your response here, I went and found your thread from yesterday. :001_smile: I'm sorry you have to give up something you love. I love one of our curricula like that and I would hate to have to give it up.

 

So if I can keep up with reading the lesson plans every day and engage in "teaching" math every day, then it will work out great! That is, of course, if my son is a willing participant. ;)

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I am in Year 1 with my 6 year old. I really like it.

 

My son likes dice games and things like that, but I wouldn't call him particularly mathy. He's VERY average academically.

 

He is super wiggly. We kept things very short at first (15 minutes) and now I am steadily increasing the time we are spending on math. He only started writing recently and is not a strong writer. He doesn't complain about the amount of writing, but occasionally I worry its too much and I will take over the writing and have him dictate.

 

I think MEP would work well with just about any child. It is multi-sensory and really mixes things up. BUT I think it might not work well if the parent was not confident with math. A friend of mine is having a hard time with it. She said it is making perfect sense to her child, but that she has her husband doing it at nighttime because she doesn't always 'get it'. (He's in year 2 or 3.) It is fairly teacher intensive, so it makes sense to me that if the teacher is not confident it might be a problem. Hopefully some parents who are not strong in math will say I'm wrong and that it is working fine for them!

 

My son does like puzzles, and I try to foster the idea that all math is a puzzle.

Elena

 

Multi sensory is very good in our house. :)

 

Being self conscience about math is a down fall for me, though. I am not very confident when I am teaching it to them and it shows. This is why a very scripted curriculum works well for us, which I understand this is. So that's a huge plus! I do need to work on my confidence while teaching, though. Ugh...

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I only like MEP if I do the entire program. If you aren't teaching the lessons as they have them written then your just doing a bunch of worksheets that, in my opinion, often don't make sense unless you've taught the lesson.

 

The lessons that you are supposed to teach are the meat of this program not the worksheets. In fact we often didn't even use the worksheet at all, opting to do our work on a whiteboard.

 

I'm no math expert but I think this program can be adapted to any type of learner. If you read the lessons you will see that they try to hit on activities appropriate to each learning style. They encourage the use of manipulatives, even suggesting that the dc gather there own counters. They use visual aids by the use of posters and work on the board. The teacher of coarse gives the lesson orally and they encourage a verbal dialog between the teacher and the student. Those are just a few examples. You can of coarse beef up one area over another if you need to. If you have a wiggly child have him come up to the whiteboard to do the practice, or jump up from his seat everytime he needs to call out an answer. If you have a workbook lover give him the practice on the worksheet.

 

Now that being said, I haven't been using it lately because of the time involved. If you teach the lessons it can be time intensive. If I did the entire lesson and practice it would usually take about 45 minutes (my dd is slow though and wants to discuss everything ad naseum...I have read of some that say they can be done in about 25 minutes). I didn't have a problem with that for the most part and will return to MEP but right now my 2yo is terrorizing the house and I'm having some behavioral\learning issues with one of my other dc, so we had to switch to something less intensive.

 

I will answer your specific questions.

 

What kind of learner is your child (if you know)? Auditory\kinesthetic.

Is your child mathematically minded?She likes math but is more language orientated.

Is your child wiggly / writing phobic or does (s)he love workbooks?Wiggly(what 7 yr.old isn't) but does like to write until her hand gets tired. Sometimes wants a workbook but if given a choice would rather be learning through dialog and doing.

Does your child like puzzles?Yes, but does not have the drive to get to the answer no matter how long it takes. If a puzzle makes her feel dumb she will give up quickly.

 

I hope some of that will help you in your decision!

 

Your post helped me tremendously with my decision! Thank you for your tips on using a whiteboard and how to make the lessons more interactive for my wiggly child.

 

I am constantly having to think up new ways for my son to be able to move during his lessons and making that movement part of the lessons. So your tips are helpful. :001_smile:

 

I think I'm going to give this a try! I don't really know exactly where to start, though, so I think I'll just start at Y1a and see how we do. He's technically in 3rd grade, but he hasn't worked with number lines yet, or >, <, ≠ . Maybe he'll be able to breeze through Y1 fairly quickly and start on Y2 soon. Then by the time September rolls around, maybe he'll be in Y3, which is like US 4th grade, right? Or is that just wishful thinking? :001_huh:

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I'm glad I could be of some help to you. I just wanted to mention a couple other wiggly helpers.

 

I printed and laminated 8x11 pieces of cardstock with all the numbers from 0 to 20 on them and would lay these out on the floor when it was time to do simple addition and subtraction problems. I would call out the problem and dd would jump onto the correct number. It worked great for mental math. You could even do this with the "what number is 4 less than 10" type problems.

 

I also got a long roll of craft paper and drew a number line on it. We would tape it down to the floor and she could jump to the answers on it as well. She liked doing long problems on this one, such as 2+3-1+4=. She loved jumping back and forth so would always say "No equals yet Mommy, keep going!"

 

The other one she liked was when I would write numbers on post it notes and stick them to the wall on the other side of the room. She would have to run and grab the right number and race back with it.

 

We wouldn't do these everyday though, usually only on Fridays. It was her reward for being relatively still during the week. On occasion though, especially if she was having a bad day, I would cut the lesson short and let her use one of these "games". It was kind of nice for me too because I could get some dishes done while I called out math problems!:tongue_smilie:

 

Have fun!

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I think I'm going to give this a try! I don't really know exactly where to start, though, so I think I'll just start at Y1a and see how we do. He's technically in 3rd grade, but he hasn't worked with number lines yet, or >, <, ≠ . Maybe he'll be able to breeze through Y1 fairly quickly and start on Y2 soon. Then by the time September rolls around, maybe he'll be in Y3, which is like US 4th grade, right? Or is that just wishful thinking? :001_huh:

 

I think that's a good idea. There is a lot of number line and inequality stuff in Year 1. There is also a lot of conceptual stuff that is challenging! It would be a shame to rush through it just to keep up with his 'grade'. I used to teach HS math, and trust me--most of my students would have benefited from going back to Year 1 and building up a better foundation!!!!! Most of them had just been moved along to stay on grade level even though they didn't really 'get' the idea of decimals, fractions, or adding negatives! If he's bored because he gets it all, then by all means jump ahead. But if it is challenging and he's learning, then I'd say disregard the year number.

 

Just make sure like others have said that you do the lesson plans, not just the worksheets. Although, I must admit, there are a few sections I skip in each lesson because they don't seem very relevant to homeschoolers who aren't in a classroom environment.

 

As far as your other comment goes about being unsure of how to explain things, I've found with my son that there is enough repetition in MEP that eventually he has an 'aha' moment on his own if we just keep working on the problems. Whenever I've tried to explain something, he gets really frustrated!! In a sense, a teacher can't really MAKE a student understand something anyway. So even though I consider myself good at explaining math, I've learned that maybe that won't be such a useful skill to have in teaching him. :glare:

 

Good luck!

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Then by the time September rolls around, maybe he'll be in Y3, which is like US 4th grade, right?

 

But in general UK year 3 would be the equivalent of US second grade. It goes:

 

Ages 4-5: UK reception, US Pre-K

Ages 5-6: UK year 1, US K

Ages 6-7: UK year 2, US 1st grade

Ages 7-8: UK year 3, US 2nd grade...

 

Laura

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What kind of learner is your child (if you know)? visual-spatial

 

Is your child mathematically minded? yes

 

Is your child wiggly / writing phobic or does (s)he love workbooks? He's only 4.5yo, so he's not writing much yet. He is not one who loves workbooks and I don't think he will be when he gets older either.

 

Does your child like puzzles? yes

 

Why don't you like MEP? We do! We are only in the Reception level, but it really engages ds. The skills are a little easy for him, as he has taught himself simple addition and subtraction, but the activities are like puzzles and still challenge him.

 

I do use Right Start with my older dd. That's what we started with and it works well for her. I'm not sure what I'll use with my other kids yet.

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After reading your response here, I went and found your thread from yesterday. :001_smile: I'm sorry you have to give up something you love. I love one of our curricula like that and I would hate to have to give it up.

 

So if I can keep up with reading the lesson plans every day and engage in "teaching" math every day, then it will work out great! That is, of course, if my son is a willing participant. ;)

 

 

Honestly I think most kids like the lesson plans! They are fun and engaging. I just wish I had the additional time and patience for each of my children to continue with MEP....and if my ds napped long enough in the afternoon for us to do the math lessons, I would :(

 

Thank you for understanding. Some may think it's silly to be sad over switching a curriculum but thankfully I'm safe on this forum to admit that..:lol:...

 

I am not writing MEP off for good though. I will always consider it when we need some additional work or "extra credit"...or what not because it's a good solid program!

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I'm glad I could be of some help to you. I just wanted to mention a couple other wiggly helpers.

 

I printed and laminated 8x11 pieces of cardstock with all the numbers from 0 to 20 on them and would lay these out on the floor when it was time to do simple addition and subtraction problems. I would call out the problem and dd would jump onto the correct number. It worked great for mental math. You could even do this with the "what number is 4 less than 10" type problems.

 

I also got a long roll of craft paper and drew a number line on it. We would tape it down to the floor and she could jump to the answers on it as well. She liked doing long problems on this one, such as 2+3-1+4=. She loved jumping back and forth so would always say "No equals yet Mommy, keep going!"

 

The other one she liked was when I would write numbers on post it notes and stick them to the wall on the other side of the room. She would have to run and grab the right number and race back with it.

 

We wouldn't do these everyday though, usually only on Fridays. It was her reward for being relatively still during the week. On occasion though, especially if she was having a bad day, I would cut the lesson short and let her use one of these "games". It was kind of nice for me too because I could get some dishes done while I called out math problems!:tongue_smilie:

 

Have fun!

 

These are so great! Thank you so much for taking the time to share with me. :001_smile: I will definitely be using these. If you have anymore tips, I'm :bigear:.

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I think that's a good idea. There is a lot of number line and inequality stuff in Year 1. There is also a lot of conceptual stuff that is challenging! It would be a shame to rush through it just to keep up with his 'grade'. I used to teach HS math, and trust me--most of my students would have benefited from going back to Year 1 and building up a better foundation!!!!! Most of them had just been moved along to stay on grade level even though they didn't really 'get' the idea of decimals, fractions, or adding negatives! If he's bored because he gets it all, then by all means jump ahead. But if it is challenging and he's learning, then I'd say disregard the year number.

 

 

 

Thanks so much for this. It makes me feel so much better about starting him at Y1a. Starting him at the (near) beginning was making me feel very anxious and like I had failed him. So your comment means a lot to me... you have no idea! :001_smile:

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But in general UK year 3 would be the equivalent of US second grade. It goes:

 

Ages 4-5: UK reception, US Pre-K

Ages 5-6: UK year 1, US K

Ages 6-7: UK year 2, US 1st grade

Ages 7-8: UK year 3, US 2nd grade...

 

Laura

 

Oh, so I had it backwards! :001_huh:

Thank you for clarifying for me! :D

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Honestly I think most kids like the lesson plans! They are fun and engaging. I just wish I had the additional time and patience for each of my children to continue with MEP....and if my ds napped long enough in the afternoon for us to do the math lessons, I would :(

 

Thank you for understanding. Some may think it's silly to be sad over switching a curriculum but thankfully I'm safe on this forum to admit that..:lol:...

 

I am not writing MEP off for good though. I will always consider it when we need some additional work or "extra credit"...or what not because it's a good solid program!

 

I am in the middle of printing out the lesson plans right now and it does seem like we are going to have fun with them. :001_smile: My intention was to print out all the lesson plans from Y1a through Y6b. However, after printing out to Y3b so far, I think I will stop at the end of Y3b. I've used up a lot of paper! (And I'm printing 2 pages per side / both sides.) I was going to spiral bind them all together, but I think it will be too thick... They'll probably fit in a 2 or 3 inch binder. :001_huh:

 

I :001_wub: one of our curricula, All About Spelling. Up until about 2 weeks ago we were using a charter school. To make a long story short, they wanted me to give up AAS because my son isn't at "grade level" for reading yet. Never mind the fact that he has made GREAT strides since beginning AAS. So... that was the straw that broke the camel's back, so to speak, and made me finally give up the charter. So believe me when I say... I totally get it. :D

 

I hope that someday soon you are able to go back to MEP. Maybe your toddler will get a sudden interest in playing freeze tag and he'll stay still and out of your hair for hours at a time allowing you to continue with MEP. :tongue_smilie:

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However, after printing out to Y3b so far, I think I will stop at the end of Y3b. I've used up a lot of paper! (And I'm printing 2 pages per side / both sides.) I was going to spiral bind them all together, but I think it will be too thick... They'll probably fit in a 2 or 3 inch binder. :001_huh:

 

 

You wouldn't happen to have a Kindle would you? I transfered our lessons to my Kindle and it worked really well. If you don't have a Kindle another option for it not taking up so much paper is to print 4 pages per sheet. 2 front and 2 back. Of coarse you have to have pretty good eyesight for this option.;)

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You wouldn't happen to have a Kindle would you? I transfered our lessons to my Kindle and it worked really well. If you don't have a Kindle another option for it not taking up so much paper is to print 4 pages per sheet. 2 front and 2 back. Of coarse you have to have pretty good eyesight for this option.;)
I'm now using my smart phone for viewing lesson plans, and by the time DD the Younger gets to the interactive worksheets (currently Y3a), she'll have a tablet at her disposal. Until then, I print up her worksheets one-sided, as more often than not we use the back of the sheet during the lesson.
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You wouldn't happen to have a Kindle would you? I transfered our lessons to my Kindle and it worked really well. If you don't have a Kindle another option for it not taking up so much paper is to print 4 pages per sheet. 2 front and 2 back. Of coarse you have to have pretty good eyesight for this option.;)

 

I had a Kindle, but took it back. It wasn't at all what I expected. I guess I was too spoiled with my iTouch, which I lost. :(

 

I did print 4 pages per sheet (2 pages per side / both sides). :) I ended up binding Y1 and Y2 together; Y3 is bound by itself as it is thick!

Edited by MangoMama
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I did print 4 pages per sheet (2 pages per side / both sides). :) I ended up binding Y1 and Y2 together; Y3 is bound by itself as it is thick!

 

Oopps missed that in your pp. Yeah, I guess there is no way around the amount of paper it takes if you print out all the lessons. Not to mention all of the worksheets too!

 

I hope you all have lots of fun with it though!

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