Jump to content

Menu

Math shopping again


shinyhappypeople
 Share

Recommended Posts

We love McRuffy, but the spiral approach isn't working for older DD, so I am shopping for a new math program. Again.

 

What are some good mastery math programs? It doesn't need to have a lot of review built-in. I can add that in myself as needed. It just needs to be a program that is easy to accelerate.

 

Singapore was a flop last year, so that's not an option for her.

 

I'm looking seriously at Modern Curriculum Press math. Anyone have experience with it?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MCP Math is total garbage and was a complete waste of our time. My kids retained nothing from it-- zip, zilch, nada.

 

My kids all love the Bright Minds/Critical Thinking Company's series called Mathematical Reasoning. I highly recommend it. I use it along with Singapore for my younger kids, but it can easily be used all by itself.

 

Once my kids hit 4th grade, though I switch them to ALEKS, which we LOVE. I love it, the kids love it, my DH loves it (he gets weekly e-mail reports on their progress). It's more expensive than a book-and-pencil curriculum, but I think it's worth every penny.

 

Hope this helps,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What exactly was it about Singapore that you didn't like?

 

MCP math reminds me very much of the kind I had growing up. Here's an example with very little in the way of explanation of the underlying concept, memorize the formula, do a bunch of problems.

 

I wouldn't recommend this approach because while I learned to calculate the answer quickly and accurately, I never really understood *why* the algorithms worked. It wasn't until I started teaching my kids with Asian-based programs (Right Start, Singapore, Math Mammoth) that the light bulb finally went on in my head. That kind of conceptual understanding is what I want for my kids.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you get the chance, read Cathy Duffy's 100 top picks for Homeschool Curriculum. There's a few chapter that helps you identify the learning style of your dc, you then identify the best math curriculum that best meets their learning style. I've approached every subject this way. And when a program doesn't work out, I try to work on my approach to teaching rather then switching curriculum. I'm not saying that it's the perfect or best solution, but it helps you narrow down your choices of programs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree with whoever said Professor B but it needs to be supplemented with more application of problem solving etc.

 

Math Mammoth, Making Math Meaningful, or Mastering Mathematics are all mastery based and I believe "systematic". Also, Prof. B is Sequential and the others may also be. I haven't seen them but what I have read.

I have been homeschooling since 1984 and have seen and used:

MUS, Developmental Mathematics, Miquon Math, Cuisinaire Rod math books, etc. and my daughter wasn't getting it. I was at a loss when she was 14 or 15 and it clicked with Prof. B! To what I have seen, I think the others might be similar. Look at samples online and see what "clicks" best.

HTH

Cyndi

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We switched from MCP Math to Math Mammoth. Ds wasn't understanding with MCP. Although I really like the TM, it just didn't work for us in the end. It could work for some, especially the kind of kid who just wants to get 'er done, but my ds got lost as he needs to see the big picture. He's thriving with MM and I'm very pleased.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids all love the Bright Minds/Critical Thinking Company's series called Mathematical Reasoning. I highly recommend it. I use it along with Singapore for my younger kids, but it can easily be used all by itself.

 

,

 

We also used a few of the Math Reasoning books and thought they were fun but I can't see them as a stand alone math program. IMO, they were a better supplement.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would have to give a BIG recommendation to try Math Mammoth. We are VERY pleased and will NOT change! I've changed math curriculum one time and it's not something I would suggest doing a lot! :001_huh: My kids have thrived with MM and I find it very easy to teach. In fact, very little teaching needs to be done unless there comes a concept my children are not understanding well. My littlest guy (5) does it with me... my other three are very independent with math. Did I mention I LOVE this math??? :D:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What exactly was it about Singapore that you didn't like?

 

She doesn't like the conceptual math and Singapore made her cry. She's okay with Math Mammoth and I plan to use that to supplement (we have the blue series). But, at heart she's a traditional math girl. It just seems to work for her.

 

Here's an example: McRuffy teaches traditional math (I think). In K & 1 there's a HUGE emphasis on using rods and cubes to represent numbers. She thinks in terms of "10s and 1s" automatically now, but she hasn't learned regrouping yet.

 

Anyway, the other day I asked her an addition problem that required regrouping and she stopped, thought about it and got the right answer. I know she wasn't just counting up, because she thinks out loud and I heard her regroup. Pretty cool. :001_smile:.

 

She intuited the need to regroup without it being taught, because how McRuffy teaches (traditional math) just fits with how her brain works. But the spiral aspect isn't an efficient way for her to learn math long term. So I'd love to find traditional math without the spiral.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She doesn't like the conceptual math and Singapore made her cry. She's okay with Math Mammoth and I plan to use that to supplement (we have the blue series). But, at heart she's a traditional math girl. It just seems to work for her.

 

Here's an example: McRuffy teaches traditional math (I think). In K & 1 there's a HUGE emphasis on using rods and cubes to represent numbers. She thinks in terms of "10s and 1s" automatically now, but she hasn't learned regrouping yet.

 

Anyway, the other day I asked her an addition problem that required regrouping and she stopped, thought about it and got the right answer. I know she wasn't just counting up, because she thinks out loud and I heard her regroup. Pretty cool. :001_smile:.

 

She intuited the need to regroup without it being taught, because how McRuffy teaches (traditional math) just fits with how her brain works. But the spiral aspect isn't an efficient way for her to learn math long term. So I'd love to find traditional math without the spiral.

 

Rod and Staff sounds like it could be a good fit. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

MEP math is free, so you can try it for merely the cost of paper and ink. I strongly suggest downloading then teacher's guide. When ds and I used it, O had it right in front of me and followed it to the letter. This is not how I normally teach math, but it was very helpful. http://www.cimt.plymouth.ac.uk/projects/mep/default.htm

 

I'm not sure why Singapore flopped, so can't help you there. I haven't bought Math Mammoth, so can't help you with that, but I second the suggestion to take a look at Cathy Duffy's book. While none of my dc fit any of the learning styles I've read, I found her chart and reviews very helpful, along with the WTM forums. How old is your dd?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She doesn't like the conceptual math and Singapore made her cry. She's okay with Math Mammoth and I plan to use that to supplement (we have the blue series). But, at heart she's a traditional math girl. It just seems to work for her.

 

Here's an example: McRuffy teaches traditional math (I think). In K & 1 there's a HUGE emphasis on using rods and cubes to represent numbers. She thinks in terms of "10s and 1s" automatically now, but she hasn't learned regrouping yet.

 

Anyway, the other day I asked her an addition problem that required regrouping and she stopped, thought about it and got the right answer. I know she wasn't just counting up, because she thinks out loud and I heard her regroup. Pretty cool. :001_smile:.

 

She intuited the need to regroup without it being taught, because how McRuffy teaches (traditional math) just fits with how her brain works. But the spiral aspect isn't an efficient way for her to learn math long term. So I'd love to find traditional math without the spiral.

 

Just curious (as I am about to buy MM, like today, finally :D), what would you say is the difference between "conceptual" math and "traditional" math? Would you consider MM to be "conceptual"?

 

My understanding was that the contents of the Blue series was the same as the Light Blue, just arranged differently, topic vs grade level. Does anyone know how difficult it would be to arrange the Blue book topics in Light Blue order? Is there some sort of chart? If that were possible, why not just use the MM you already own?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This looks like something ds6 would enjoy. Do you do just the book or do you do online? If you do online, do you need the book?

 

I use the CDs but the online program is a great way to try the program.

 

It's a solid mathematics program, utilizing a mastery approach, and does an excellent job of explaining mathematical theory.

 

I use the Key to . . . series for measurement, metric measurement and geometry, and we use LoF as a fun way to review.

Edited by ELaurie
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...