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Can someone plz describe the cursive instruction in PR2?


HappyGrace
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Is it tied in with the spelling?

 

No, all the spelling is printed for Level 2.

 

When does it start and over how many wks does it go?

 

Introduced in Week 31 and goes through week 34. So, at the end of Level 2 for 4 weeks they are learning cursive (includes connecting, etc and both lower and upper case). On week 34, they "practice" cursive by a grammar review.

 

Example Day one: "Using the grammar review, write definitions for noun on Framing code 21a in cursive writing." They go on to do this through the week with the definitions for an adjective, an article, pronoun, verb, preposition, adverb, and conjunction. I just love the way she makes things efficient!

 

Any info appreciated! Thanks!

 

HTH! :001_smile:

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So they basically take four weeks out and teach cursive separately?

 

Would it be the type of thing where I could have ds watch the dvd for that? (I don't mind the dvd's for *me* for the other stuff, but it seems it would be more efficient with the cursive instruction to just have him watch her.)

 

Did your dc do ok learning it in just four wks? I mean, I'm kind of surprised but also kind of like that she concentrates on it and gets it done rather than dragging it out!

 

Thanks!

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We did cursive with PR1 instead of the printing. He was 5 years old. He learned all of the cursive letters in 2 weeks and then capital letters in one week. We used Cursive First for the cursive instruction and worksheets. He did GREAT with it! I liked that we introduced all of the letters quickly and then practiced them as we go. It's been about 3 and a half months now and his cursive is beautiful and about 4 weeks ago he said he didn't need the handwriting page practice anymore. I agree with him because he gets a lot of cursive practice with other things. Once he learned all of the letters in lowercase, we switched to writing all school work in cursive. He could print with other things if he chose to do so, but once we switched to all cursive for school work, he switched to cursive for his personal writing too.

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So they basically take four weeks out and teach cursive separately?

 

Would it be the type of thing where I could have ds watch the dvd for that? (I don't mind the dvd's for *me* for the other stuff, but it seems it would be more efficient with the cursive instruction to just have him watch her.)

 

Did your dc do ok learning it in just four wks? I mean, I'm kind of surprised but also kind of like that she concentrates on it and gets it done rather than dragging it out!

 

Thanks!

Yes, your spelling and grammar becomes cursive writing introduction and then practice. Using connective cursive models the letters in manuscript, then teaches a few simple strokes to connect the letters by writing over the manuscript alphabet. There are only a few letters with a different look, so for the most part, the dc learn the connective strokes (upswings, dips, loops, curve back sharply). It's VERY simple. It was much, much easier to pick up (and teach) then HWT, imo. We actually didn't have any tears.

 

They could watch the dvd, and in addition I'd advise you write down your own abbreviations to the letters as she goes. In other words, when she says, short upswing, I denote: SU; TU for tall upswing; D for dip, etc. so that as they practice daily, you can watch over them, reminding them of the proper strokes. After a couple of days, you'll have the terminology down pat.

 

It makes for a slow few weeks of writing, but once they are finished with learning all the letters, they have a "cheat sheet" and combined with the grammar review, they are pretty solid with cursive. I was surprised at how well it stuck, but since the "connective cursive" style is so similar to manuscript, it is actually quite simple. We do keep our "cheat sheet" handy (which they will recreate in the beginning of PR3), but for the most part, the boys don't use it anymore. We're on page 3 of PR3 spelling list and they're writing it in cursive, no cheat sheet, and at a fast pace. It's nice :) After writing the words, they read off the list, so they are also practicing reading cursive (something my 8th grader didn't grasp with other programs and I had to remediate).

 

I have a post about it on my blog.

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lol-that's so funny-I did Cursive First with older dd but in 2nd grade after she could print. I loved it as a cursive program! That's kind of why I'm asking about PR; wondering if I should just use CF instead with ds, or if the cursive training is too tied in to the program to do CF.

 

I wouldn't say it's deeply tied, other than practicing the newly acquired skill by writing the grammar review. It really is SUPER easy to teach and learn, though. FWIW ;)

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Sorry I didn't get back sooner, I agree with Tina. We are just starting level 2, and I have watched a lot of the videos. I've been using GD Italics with my kids and I really like the look of it. When I get there, I plan to use my GD Book (just the cursive part). That's the only thing I change about PR for us. As for the look of her cursive, it is more simplified than regular cursive. For example, the B looks like a manuscript B instead of the regular cursive B. For us, I just like the slender look of Italics, and its working well for my kiddos.

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Hi,

 

I have been wondering about the handwriting, I am considering purchasing PR for a few of my children.

 

We also use GD Italics and I like it. So...it will work to use the handwriting of my choice with this?

 

Kim

 

I would say yes. Its the only thing we don't do with PR. Its a very small part of the program. I will say that she does a great job of making print and cursive really easy for a child to understand and integrating them into the program. She uses a clock to help a child visualize where to start their letters. I think that's cool. Printing is taught in level 1 weeks 1-4 (lowercase and 0-9) and in week 13 (Uppercase). Cursive is taught in Level 2 weeks 31-34. Both are easily adaptable for using your own thing like we do. HTH!

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Is there a sample of the PR cursive online anywhere? From what I can tell looking at your blog, Tina, it looks like...I don't know...normal?...cursive to me. lol I'm just curious what the capitals all look like. For instance, is the Q one of those things that looks sort of like a 2? I'm just curious. :)

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Is there a sample of the PR cursive online anywhere? From what I can tell looking at your blog, Tina, it looks like...I don't know...normal?...cursive to me. lol I'm just curious what the capitals all look like. For instance, is the Q one of those things that looks sort of like a 2? I'm just curious. :)

:bigear: I'm curious too. Does the PR style handwriting have a name? I've always wondered . . . I love the looks of it.

 

The Q is a printed capital Q :D. I happen to have Level Three and it's all done in cursive! :001_smile:

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Is there a sample of the PR cursive online anywhere? From what I can tell looking at your blog, Tina, it looks like...I don't know...normal?...cursive to me. lol I'm just curious what the capitals all look like. For instance, is the Q one of those things that looks sort of like a 2? I'm just curious. :)

You can click to the middle of the PR3 sample video online and see what it looks like. It's called connective cursive. It keeps things really simple. No fancy loops. When I taught it, I showed my dd that sometimes a Q looks like this (and made the fancy 2,) or a D has this loop, or a P has this loop so they would not be surprised if they ever saw different versions. It was super easy and they play with their cursive for fun by adding fancy loops to every letter :)

 

It is pretty normal. The difference for me was the simple instruction. Basically, write out your ABCs, now let's connect them with the easily understood descriptions of connecting strokes. No need for a special workbook. No need for intense cursive study. The daily practice, then grammar review, followed by reading of the spelling lists really do the trick. Easy breezy!

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Thanks, ladies! That sounds fantastic. We've used Peterson Directed Handwriting so far, but I don't really like the look of their cursive. I'm glad to know I can discontinue that program next year, even though we've loved it so far. It will be nice to have that all in one thing. (DD doesn't get the whole clock face thing, even though she can tell time, lol.)

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Thanks, ladies! That sounds fantastic. We've used Peterson Directed Handwriting so far, but I don't really like the look of their cursive. I'm glad to know I can discontinue that program next year, even though we've loved it so far. It will be nice to have that all in one thing. (DD doesn't get the whole clock face thing, even though she can tell time, lol.)

I was thinking about buying a clock stamp. I don't know if I could easily find one, but I know Office Depot allows you to design a stamp and they're usually BOGO! I was also thinking of using the "get one" part and design a house stamp (it's how Sensational Strategies initially teaches tall and short letters).

 

Regardless, the transition from printing to cursive is a piece of cake with PR.

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