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Need Saxon to Singapore advice


LaissezFaire
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I am in the process of testing my 7th graders into Singapore math and it's very obvious their level in Saxon is far higher than what they will test into in Singapore. Does anyone have experience with going from Saxon to Singapore. If your child was in 7/6, which Singapore level does that pretty much correspond with?

 

My girls are struggling with the assessments partly because of the metrics and partly because Saxon just hasn't covered the material on the assessment test. (I was giving them 5A). I am tempted to start at the beginning even though they are 7th graders. (They aren't particularly mathy but have always done ok with math until this year where they seem to be not 'getting it').

 

So any advice or comments on going from Saxon 7/6 into Singapore would be greatly appreciated.

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I am not necessarily saying that your choice is bad, but you need to think about this...are you a math gal? If not, do yourself a favor and stick with Saxon, where there is a solutions manual with more than just the answers. Saxon works the problems out for you so you can see how they get to the answer. This may not seem like such a big deal in the younger grades but as they get older it is a really big deal. I had to switch from Singapore for that reason, even though we liked it. I am loving the change, having a thorough solution's manual and lessons that give better instruction as to how to complete the problems given.

If it helps in your decisions, my math-minded Dd when from 5B to Saxon 8/7 with no difficulty. I also had a difficult time placing her in Saxon because the two approaches and terminology are so different.

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I wouldn't say that I am a math type of person. We have run into problems, particularly in the Intensive Practice books that we couldn't figure out, but when that happens, I just look online or ask on the boards and someone always helps us make sense of it. I don't think that is a reason not to use the program. Also Home Instructors guides are available for most, if not all the levels.

 

If it will bother you not to be able to do every problem, or to take the time to look up the answer online, then you probably won't like Singapore.

 

We love it though and my 11yo is finishing up 6B this winter. We are sad!

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I don't have a problem searching for the answers. I am getting the Instructor's guide and i don't plan on just sending them off to do their lesson. I strongly feel that they need Singapore approach. They need to get the whys of the concept more than just do this step and that step and I think Singapore will really help with that. Worse case scenario we can always go back to Saxon. Believe me I have thought about it. I do not begin anything without really thinking it through, I've been at this homeschool game awhile now. ;)

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My son just switched from Singapore to Saxon. He finished 4A. We spent a few days going over decimals in 4B and then went into Saxon 7/6 based on placement tests. It is fairly easy for him at this point (not sure if it would be review for a Saxon person too?) which is about lesson 30. Much of it is review. brownie

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I just wanted to say that the way Singapore teaches things is not always the same as the "traditional American way" which, I gather, is what Saxon emphasizes. For example, Singapore uses the chapters on measurement (length, weight, and capacity) to solidify the idea of place value, since each unit of measurement has its own base system. (One example of this is that when you borrow and carry when you add feet and inches, you must convert each unit of feet into twelve units of inches, not just ten to one as in the metric system or ordinary base ten numbers.) Fractions are taught not just once, but each year in increasing complexity.

 

But after a transition period, your kids may make the switch without too much trouble. You could always go back one year further than their assessed level if you want to make sure they have the foundation firmly laid. I wouldn't see any need to take 7th graders all the way back to 1a. For example, if you kids have their math facts memorized with whole numbers, you might want to start at level 4A, where more complex ideas about whole numbers are first introduced.

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