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Could you list the first five classic books you read aloud to your children, along with their earliest ages? (If you have multiple children, try to list the earliest ages overall.) I'm talking chapter books that most people would consider classic lit, not poems or modern readers like Ribsy. Maybe something along this format:

 

Alice in Wonderland - Age 6.5

Peter Pan - Age 7

If the child didn't understand at least 75% of the book (perhaps because you were mostly reading for the benefit of an older sibling with a higher maturity level) don't list it. I'm trying to get a feel for how early other people introduce the classics and what titles they have had the best experiences with in reading aloud to younger children. :)

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These are a few I've read recently to my 5yo and 7yo. The 5yo enjoyed them immensely. (The 7yo did, too.)

 

Charlotte's Web - 5yo

Little House Books (the 1st three in the series including Farmer Boy) - 5yo

 

I've successfully done the Narnia books with as young as 5-6 yo.

 

I'm not sure what your definition of a classic is.

Edited by Luann in ID
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Read-alouds:

 

Rikki Tikki Tavi - Age 5

Just So Stories - Age 6

Pinocchio - Age 7

 

Right now, at age 7, he's listening to Trumpet of the Swan. Next in line is Dr. Dolittle. He just started reading Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone.

 

Dh tried reading Treasure Island to ds at 5 or 6, but it was way over his head, so we shelved it until he's ready.

 

I want to read The Five Children and It to him too. I think he would enjoy it. Next on the list as read-alouds:

 

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Little Britches

Where The Red Fern Grows

The Secret Garden

A Little Princess

 

I don't know if the last two are considered classics, but certainly American classics, no?

At age 6, he read to himself:

 

Charlotte's Web

 

I also read aloud My Father's Dragon, the whole series (age 6), Little House in the Big Woods (age 6), but I didn't think those were considered great literature, as in Great Books status. I could be wrong, of course.

Edited by sagira
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I tried reading Little House in the Big Woods to dd when she was 4 and while she did retain what we were reading, she didn't look forward to the reading and ds interupted almost constantly so we decided to shelve it.

 

We are now doing HOD and reading the Burgess chapter books and I think they are a great introduction to chaptered read alouds. I think I will add a classic chapter book to our reading schedule in a few months. I plan on picking a few and letting dd choose between them.

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Little House Books- 0 to 9 months old

Wizard of Oz- 1 years old

Swiss Family Robinson- 1 year old

Charlotte's Web- 1 years old

Heidi- 1 year old

 

I do plan on rereading these with her at a later time. It was more just to get her used to listening and to enjoy books. I'm pretty sure she didn't get a thing out of them story-wise.

 

ETA: Sorry, didn't see the last part were you didn't want me to list it if she didn't get a thing out of it. My bad.

Edited by MeaganS
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Little House in the Big Woods - 5.5, 3.5

Charlotte's Web - 6, 4

Little House on the Prairie - 6.5, 4.5

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland - 7, 5

 

FYI, the younger child listed has an incredible memory and attention span for his age. His sis would not have gotten much out of these books if she had been the younger one.

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Defining "classics" pretty conservatively:

 

The Complete Tales of Winnie-the-Pooh, tried at age 3.5 but much more successful after age 4

Little House in the Big Woods, 4

The Wizard of Oz, 4.5

Alice in Wonderland, 4.5

The Secret Garden, 5.5

A Little Princess, 5.5

 

Some other books which I would consider classics, but which you may not:

My Father's Dragon - 3.5

James and the Giant Peach - 3.5

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe - 4

All-of-a-Kind Family - 4

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Could you list the first five classic books you read aloud to your children, along with their earliest ages? (If you have multiple children, try to list the earliest ages overall.) I'm talking chapter books that most people would consider classic lit, not poems or modern readers like Ribsy. Maybe something along this format:

 

Alice in Wonderland - Age 6.5

Peter Pan - Age 7

If the child didn't understand at least 75% of the book (perhaps because you were mostly reading for the benefit of an older sibling with a higher maturity level) don't list it. I'm trying to get a feel for how early other people introduce the classics and what titles they have had the best experiences with in reading aloud to younger children. :)

 

Beatrix Potters Complete Tales

Charlotte's Web

Alice In Wonderland

Fairy Tales and Nursery Rhymes

Burgess Bird and Animal Books,

Just So Stories

 

These are the earliest Classic books I read to my children starting at around 3.

At 6 we read Little House series

at 7 we read the Narnia Books

 

We read other not-so-classic but great reads mixed in there as well..

 

Faithe

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Also defining 'classics' very loosely, I just started read-aloud literature to my two kiddos (ages 7 and recently-turned 9) this school year. So far we have read:

 

Because of Winn Dixie

Bridge to Terabithia

Macbeth (Shakespeare for Kids)

The Tempest (Shakespeare for Kids)

A Midsummer Night's Dream (Shakespeare for Kids)

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

 

We're going to do The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe after Christmas. Both my kids have understood the readings and even my youngest got a lot out of A Christmas Carol (I was surprised at how much he actually understood). Believe it or not, their favorites by far have been the Shakespeare books. I'm going to get a few more of those for next year.

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Having trouble with the definition of classics as posed by the OP. I can think of a lot of books in between the classic statuses of Ribsy and Alice in Wonderland. But I'll venture with these...

 

The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh - 4.5

Charlotte's Web - 5

The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe - 5

The Little Prince - 6

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I'm not the OP, but hope it's okay to ask - do you use a specific curriculum to teach the classics? I'm having trouble finding one that covers most of them. Or do you just add them in to whatever you are using? I'm trying to find something very open and go with a schedule for literature, history, bible, etc. I'm considering Sonlight but they don't have as many of the classics as I thought they would. Which open-and-go curriculum seems to have the most in your opinion? Thanks!

 

ETA: Maybe I should make this a separate post?

Edited by jer2911mom
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The two that come to mind:

Pollyanna at 6

The Little Princess at 6 - she begged me to stop reading when Sara was told her father had died and then she cried at how it was the worst book ever - why did the mean writer do that when the dad was alive the whole time. She is a little emotional!

 

I have read The Little House series to the kids starting at four. They were very disturbed by all the horrible things that happened to the family.

 

Is there a classic that does not involve horrific tragedy - we just finished Voyage of the Dawn Treader and she cried at the end of that too when Lucy was told she can't go back to Narnia.

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Winnie The Pooh -- 2 or 3 years old

Mr. Popper's Penguins -- 3

My Father's Dragon -- 4

Moomintrolls -- 4

Wind In The Willows -- 4

Alice in Wonderland -- 5

Treasure Island -- 5

A Christmas Carol -- 6

The Hobbit -- 7

Tom Sawyer -- 7

 

Both my husband and I have done read alouds since our boys were very young, these are the ones I can think of right now. They pay attention surprisingly well and love to hear more. I think good reading skills (on the part of the adult, that is) make a huge difference. We do voices and read dramatically. My kids will stop me occasionally for a definition if they need, or I will insert one if I think a word is challenging. I averaged the ages of my two boys to get my estimate. We're currently reading "A Christmas Carol" aloud for the second year running.

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The Little Princess at 6 - she begged me to stop reading when Sara was told her father had died and then she cried at how it was the worst book ever - why did the mean writer do that when the dad was alive the whole time. She is a little emotional!.

 

Oh my goodness. The father in A Little Princess most certainly is not alive the whole time. He dies and stays dead. Was this a novelization of the movie?

 

We recently read that book too. I previewed the basic plot for my 5yo in advance because I knew that otherwise it would be much too sad for her to bear. Which led to the moment when she leaned trustingly against me and asked,

 

"Mom, when Sara's father's friends find her in the end, do they kill Miss Minchin?" :lol:

Edited by Rivka
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Beatrix Potter, complete tales age 4

The Hobbit age 5

Charlotte's Web age 5

Rikki Tikki Tavi and the Just-So-Stories age 5

The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe age 6 (dd was 4)

Beowulf (Michael Morpurgo's picture book version, so I don't know if this counts) age 6 (dd was 4)

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My DDs are 6 and 4. This fall we read:

 

Alice in Wonderland

Wizard of Oz

Secret Garden

The Christmas Carol (we decided it was too spooky and quit halfway)

Journey to the Center of the Earth (reading now)

 

Not chapter books, but we also enjoyed a collection of Raggedy Ann stories and Beatrix Potter.

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  • 2 months later...

I'm not sure what qualifies as a classic classic, as opposed to a modern classic; for example, I've included Astrid Lindgren but not Roald Dahl for no good reason, and the Oz books but not Jenny and the Cat Club.

 

DD the Elder (now 9):

Charlotte's Web - 3 yo

Little House in the Big Woods through On the Banks of Plum Creek - 3

Pippi Longstocking books - 3 (do these count?)

Oz books through Ozma of Oz - 4

The Railway Children, Five Children and It - 4

The Lang coloured Fairy Books (all 12) - 4 and 5

 

DD the Younger (now 6):

Pippi Longstocking books - 5

Winnie-the-Pooh - 5

Mary Poppins (all) - 5

Charlotte's Web 5

Little House in the Big Woods through On the Banks of Plum Creek - 5

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Charlotte's Web

Alice in Wonderland

Mary Poppins

Little House in the Big Woods

Paddle to the Sea

Mr. Popper's Penguins

Cricket in Times Square

 

We read these when my oldest was 5-6...We've read others and quit because she wasn't understanding them very well (Peter Pan--I'm talkin' to you). I only listed ones she really enjoyed. Currently we are reading Trumpet of the Swan and they both enjoy it (ages 8 and 6)

Edited by Holly
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I'm trying to keep track of the books I'm starting to read aloud to my dds so I am keeping it on my blog.

My oldest will be 5 in a couple months so we are starting more chapter books since her attention span has increased greatly.

Since my 2 year old likes to sit and listen I try to always start our reading session at night at least 1/2 an hour or an hour before their bedtime. I read one or two picture or board books for my 2 year old first. Somedays my 4 year old asks if she can read the picture book for me. Both girls seem to get a kick out of that. After the picture book we do a chapter from our current chapter book. My 2 year old inevitably wanders around and loses interest but my older daughter really likes it.

 

I am intrigued to read this post because I thought I should start with "easier" books than classics. I was doing Beverly Clearly and Roald Dahl books and I have to admit- I don't like them. And reading AA Milne was painful for me!!! Did anyone else out there think that Winnie the Pooh is probably one of the only books out there that makes a better movie. It was so disjointed and choppy. I hated it and had to force myself to smile my way through it.

 

I have been putting off things like Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland because I thought it would be too advanced. After reading this post I am thinking I will start off there instead.

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Along with dozens upon dozens of high quality picture books, since late last summer when my kiddos were 5 and 3 we've read:

 

Story Books:

 

Little House in the Big Woods

 

Complete Tales of Beatrix Potter

 

Winnie the Pooh

 

My Father's Dragon

 

Just So Stories

 

 

Various "Classics" in other genres:

 

Tales of Virtue

 

Aesop's Fables (for Children)

 

Manners Can Be Fun

 

How to Speak Politely and Why

 

Fairy Tales in their original formats

 

Paddle to the Sea

We're currently reading:

 

The Sandburg Treasury

 

Little House on the Prairie

 

The Little Prince

 

Edited by JoyfullyNoisy
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Okay, these aren't all classics. But they are considered by many to be good books. My boys are 6 1/2 and 5. These are the books we have read in the last two years. So starting at age 4 1/2 and 3.

 

My Father's Dragon Series by Ruth Stiles Gannett

When my boys were 4 1/2 and 3 my eldest really loved the book. My youngest knew a boy was on a adventures and listened in on bits of it. He didn't follow the story line.

 

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum (And the nest 3 books)

First read through was at 5 1/2 and 4. My eldest loved the story and listened to it several times. My youngest liked the first book. But there was a difficulty hick in the next one. He followed along okay for the nest two - but book 4 did him in. When I re read the second and third book last month my youngest loved it and followed it no problem. BUT at that point my eldest didn't like it since he knew the story line so well.

 

The Story of Dr. Dolittle by Hugh Lofting

Read it at ages 5 and 3 1/2 and it was loved by both. The pictures in the book were so wonderful. I tired to reread it a few months ago but my eldest wouldn't tolerate it - since he heard it so often already.

 

The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi

Tired to read it at ages 5 and 3 1/2. My eldest understood it just fine - but couldn't stand the book.

 

Pippi Longstocking series by Astrid Lindgren

Read it at 5 1/2 and 4 . We got the picture book versions that are basically a illustrated chapter taken from the book. My eldest liked the first book and we read it twice. My youngest LOVED them all and I think listened to the first book 3 times, and the other 2 twice. At that point my eldest couldn't stand the book. (I have discovered now that he doesn't like any books where the characters have 'bad' habits or are 'naughty')

 

The Little Prince by Antonie de Saint-Exupery's

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. I got a beautifully non-abridged pop-up version of this book. My youngest loved it and we listened to it twice. My eldest listened the first time, and barely tolerated it the second time. When my youngest 'threatened' to pick it again my eldest swore he would leave the house whenever I read it. (He doesn't have to be in the room for his brother's pick. But I wouldn't let him leave the HOUSE)

 

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. Neither boy really got into it - and we actually stopped with only one chapter left. They could follow along with each chapter by the story had to high of a nonsense factor to it.

 

The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

Read it at 5 1/2 and 4 We read a abridged version illustrated by Inga Moore. (We like her illustrations). Both boys really liked it. My youngest use to shout out "It's a mole. It's a MOLE!" (OR something along that line from the last chapter when they attack Toad's house.

 

Mary Poppins by P. L. Travers

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. My youngest really liked it and wanted it another time. But my eldest convinced him to choose something else. (Again - the kids and Mary Poppins where to 'naughty' for his tastes.)

 

Chitty Chitty Bang Bang by Ian Fleming

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. My youngest loved this book. It's one book that just makes you want to eat brownies when you are finished reading it.

 

Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie

I wasn't meaning to read this to my eldest at the time. But I put in a audio book for myself to listen to and he became transfixed by it. He ended up listening to it in about 2 days. I then read it to him. I think he was 3 1/2 maybe 4 at the time. He thought that Hook was complete misunderstood and just needed friends and understanding.

 

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl

Read it at 5 and 3 1/2, and then again at 6 and 4 1/2. My youngest didn't really get much out of it at the first reading, but really liked it on the second reading.

 

James and the Giant Peach, The BFG, and Fantastic Mr. Fox by Roald Dahl

Read them at 5 1/2 and 4. Both liked them and followed along just fine.

 

A Bear Called Paddington (and More about Paddington) by Michael Bond

Read them at 6 and 4 1/2. I think I missed the boat on these. They just weren't that into them - found them kind of slow and boring.

 

The Wheel on the School by Meindert DeJong

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. At first this book was slow going and they preferred the other book we were listening to (One of the books about Freddy the pig) But in the end this book majorly won out. My eldest would actually hop about on the couch and well... act like he was having a seize when I told him we were going to read this book. It was very strange how much he was into this book.

 

The Twenty-One Ballons by William Pene du Bois

Read it at 5 1/2 and 4. Both boys followed along and enjoyed the book. At the time it was better suited to my eldest.

 

The Secret World of Og by Pierre Berton

Read it at 6 and 4 1/2. My youngest really loved this book. My eldest had no trouble following along - but it didn't suit him very well.

 

Freddy goes to Florida (And the next two books) by Walter Brooks

Both boys liked the series. I didn't really go for the second book as much. My eldest adored the third book "Freddy the detective" and would floop about on the couch called out "Freddy" when it was book time.

 

I'm saving the best for last.....

Books by Thornton Burgess we have 27 books about the Green Forest, The Green Meadows, and the Smiling pool. We are getting two more for Christmas.

 

We listened to the first one at 4 1/2 and 3. My eldest was the perfect age at that time. We 'lived' with those books one, then the next, then the next, repeating favorites... for about 2 months. My youngest at the time got lots out of each book - but he didn't always have perfect understanding. We are right now (at 6 1/2 and 5) re-reading every one of the books. At this age they are great for my youngest and a pleasant trip down memory lane for my eldest.

I am making a note of this because you have some books I really want to read to my kids. I will check out those Thorton Burgess' books.

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Some of our early favorites:

 

The Story of Dr. Dolittle

The Trumpet of the Swan

My Father's Dragon

The Cricket in Times Square

 

Favorites in 3rd and 4th:

 

Carry on, Mr. Bowditch

Snow Treasure (McSwigan)

Twenty and Ten (Bishop)

The House of Sixty Fathers (M. DeJong/illus. M. Sendak)

The Prince and the Pauper (loves the wit of Mark Twain)

Swallows and Amazons (A. Ransom--we were a sailing family and they enjoyed all the nautical references and inspires them to write their own chapter book on their sailing adventures with their brothers.)

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What I have personally read aloud to them starting around ages 5 and 4 (they are now 7 and 6):

The Secret Garden

The Chronicles of Narnia

The Little House books

Just So Stories

 

I've also got 2 and almost 4 year old boys who aren't so cooperative for snuggle on the couch reading sessions, so finding time to read aloud to the older two is hard.

 

Enter audiobooks!

 

We spend a lot of time in the car, and my kids LOVE getting audiobooks from the library. Over the past 2 years, they have listened to (each repeatedly):

Heidi

Peter Pan

The Wizard of Oz

The Indian in the Cupboard

Dr. DooLittle

The Wind in the Willows

The Spanking Boy

Charlotte's Web

The Tale of Despereaux

Sarah Plain and Tall

The Little House on the Prairie

Alice in Wonderland

James and the Giant Peach

Old Yeller

Carry on Mr. Bowditch

Misty of Chincoteague

Where the Red Fern Grows

Ella Enchanted

...and probably several others that I've just forgotten about!

 

When they listen without me, I have the give me summaries of what happened so I can see how much they are getting out of the stories. I'm often impressed!

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My boys were 5.5 years when I realized they were totally listening to an audio of The Mixed Up Chronicles of Mrs. Frank E. Frankweiler.

 

About kids who run away to the library.

 

Anyway, I immediately started reading the entire Little House series to them starting w/ In the Big Woods (starts slowly, just slog through). We went through all eight books. They loved them. When they were six we read all eight again (yes, I love Laura, but I'm tired).

 

They also loved hearing the Tomie de Paola's autobiography stories. SUPER good.

 

Trumpet of the Swan

Charlotte's Web

etc.

 

Alley

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We have mainly gone off the Sonlight K read-aloud list. I don't know that I'd consider many of them "classics". Here's my list of classics (or close to ;)), with my kids this last year at ages 3 & 5:

 

The House at Pooh Corner

Dr. Doolittle

My Father's Dragon

Mr. Popper's Penguins

Beatrix Potter from a very young age

 

(I have a complete list of all our read alouds for Preschool & K in my sidebar on my blog.) I have a lot more lined up for the rest of the year and next year.

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  • 1 year later...

I can't remember which boy had which book read to them at the youngest age, but for argument sakes, here is a list that any one of them would have heard between the ages of 4 and 6 (and from what I can remember, they have all been enjoyed):

 

Cricket in Times Square

Trumpet of the Swan

Little House books (though book 5)

Heidi

Paddington (ds#3 LOVES Paddington)

Narnia (LWW, Prince Capsian, Voyage of the Dawn Treader, and Silver Chair)

various E. Nesbit

Charlotte's Web

Beatrix Potter

Winnie-the-Pooh

Ramona books (not sure if you'd consider these classic)

Just So Stories

Jungle Book

Stuart Little (though we all thought it was a little weird and didn't like the ending)

Sign of the Beaver

Wizard of Oz

Mr. Popper's Penguins

The Indian in the Cupboard

Mary Poppins

 

I'm not sure what else. And, not classics (at least not yet), but Harry Potter (all 7) and the Penderwicks (all 3) have been much loved here by even our 6 year old.

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I wouldn't have a clue what my dd understands and doesn't, but I read Pride and Prejudice to her this year, since she is familiar with the BBC production. She enjoyed it. But, being language delayed, not understanding everything is entirely normal so it doesn't bother her as it would a typically developing child. I go with the theory that I can read whatever tickles my fancy unless I get complaints, and I've only ever had to drop one book.

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My kids are not classic lovers - I'm going to try some out this next coming year but until now besides the hundreds of classic picture books we have read all three of them have listened to and enjoyed

 

Dr. Dolittle

The Boxcar Chldren (not sure if that counts but we are on the third book)

 

My DD has listened to a little of the Blue Fairy book

 

Honestly I think it's mainly my fault - whilst I enjoy the classic books I don't enjoy reading them out loud. I'll probably end up doing a lot of them via audiobook.

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I've been reading Beatrix Potter to my 2 year old and it seems to be at least 75 percent comprehensible to him. According to my reading guru Dorothy Butler, the stories most suitable for 2-3.5yos are:

  • Tale of Peter Rabbit
  • Tale of Tom Kitten
  • Story of Miss Moppet
  • Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher
  • Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes
  • Cecily Parsley's Nursery Rhymes

I also read The Velveteen Rabbit and Enid Blyton's Tales of Ancient Greeks to him and while I won't say there was 75 percent comprehension, he did seem very excited about them both, for apparently horse-related reasons. "Yes! Read the Skin Horse! Skin Horse!" and "Sun horses! Sun horses!" (Phaeton in the Blyton).

 

Oh, and he also really liked The Nursery Alice, which is a version of Alice in Wonderland abridged by Carroll himself for the 0-5 age group.

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My girls are 4 and 6. In the last year we have read:

Beatrix Potter collection

My Father's Dragon trilogy

Little House in the Big Woods & Little House on the Prairie

A Bear Called Paddington

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Stuart Little (which we didn't love at all)

Aesop's Fables collection

Mother Goose collection

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This is a great list of books.

 

I don't have to much to contribute since I haven't done too many classics yet.

 

Huck Finn the classic starts version -Age 4 He is enjoying it and wants to read Tom Sawyer next

James and the Giant Peach -Age 6

 

I got a lot of the books mentioned but my oldest keeps picking fluff to read. I think my 4 year old will probably start liking classics. I just started with him and he is enjoying the one we are reading. I don't know how to convince my 6 year old girl to read better quality material. She likes stuff like Amber Brown, Junie B Jones and Judy Blume. I also wish my kids at least my 4 and 6 year old would read books together but they never want to read the same books.

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I can't remember everything, but here is a list of some we started with.

 

Little House in the Big Woods - 4

Little House on the Prairie - 4

The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh - 4

Charlotte's Web - 4

Heidi - 4

Five Children and It - 4

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My daughter is 4 and loves to be read to. So far I've finished reading to her The Trumpet of the Swan, Stuart Little, and we are now working our way through Alice in Wonderland (which is her favorite so far). He little brother (2) listens occasionally but often wanders in and out and colors. As long as he's quiet I don't worry about it.

 

We've also done a couple of audio books, Winnie the Pooh and Marry Poppins come to mind, although I'm sure there are others. DD actually enjoyed the Mary Poppins movie much more after listening to the book then she did before. We also have an incentive set up when we're finished reading Alice in Wonderland we're going to have popcorn and watch the movie together. It helps keep her asking to read more and it keeps me committed to reading at least a couple of chapters a day.

 

We've also enjoyed several of the "Great Illustrated Classics" series. They're not exactly chapter books, but the language is old so it helps get her used to listening to books whose language is different (and bonus it gets me used to reading it out loud!). They're long too, probably 20-30 pages on average. We've read through all of the ones in the Cinderella book (includes Cinderella, Jack the Giant Killer, and The Ugly Duckling among others).

 

I'm trying to keep track of the books I'm starting to read aloud to my dds so I am keeping it on my blog.

My oldest will be 5 in a couple months so we are starting more chapter books since her attention span has increased greatly.

Since my 2 year old likes to sit and listen I try to always start our reading session at night at least 1/2 an hour or an hour before their bedtime. I read one or two picture or board books for my 2 year old first. Somedays my 4 year old asks if she can read the picture book for me. Both girls seem to get a kick out of that. After the picture book we do a chapter from our current chapter book. My 2 year old inevitably wanders around and loses interest but my older daughter really likes it.

 

I am intrigued to read this post because I thought I should start with "easier" books than classics. I was doing Beverly Clearly and Roald Dahl books and I have to admit- I don't like them. And reading AA Milne was painful for me!!! Did anyone else out there think that Winnie the Pooh is probably one of the only books out there that makes a better movie. It was so disjointed and choppy. I hated it and had to force myself to smile my way through it.

 

I have been putting off things like Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland because I thought it would be too advanced. After reading this post I am thinking I will start off there instead.

 

I agree, Winnie the Pooh was tough on me to read so we got the audio book from the library! For what it's worth my daughter (4) is loving Alice in Wonderland and really seems to understand it. We have also enjoyed Stuart Little and next on our list is Mr. Poppers Penguins.

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A lot of classics are sad or scary but then they probably weren't written for four year olds.

 

Winnie the pooh - 3.5

Beatrix Potter - 4/2

 

At the moment my 5.5 is obsessed with Enid Blyton's famous five but my 3.5 hates it.

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Older dd will be 6 in 2 WEEKS!!!!

 

In the past few months we have read

 

Little House in the Big Woods

Little House on the Prairie

On the Banks of Plum Creek

Beezus and Ramona

 

and we are now reading:

On the Shores of Silver Lake

 

Older dd seem to understand most of it.

 

HOWEVER:

 

1) We read in the morning before toddler dd is awake or at bedtime when Dad is available to watch toddler dd.

 

and

 

2) We are extended nursers, so dd5 is still nursing in the morning and evening. I have read these chapter books to her during her morning and evening nursings. (Interrupting her to point out pictures has definitely cut down on her nursing, so we are moving towards natural weaning).

 

****My point is that I doubt dd would be happy moving to chapter books if she was only allowed to "sit quietly and listen." You may need a plan for your child to color or do a quiet craft (string pony beads, cutting and gluing random shapes of construction paper, legos) while sitting nearby and listening to the story.******

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