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about what other parents feed their kids?

 

These are the men and women who will marry my kids and feed my grandchildren.

 

 

duck.gif

 

 

Honestly, not really for the reason you stated. :) I figure most kids will grow up and one day be mature enough to make their own decisions on how to eat. Just because one feeds their kids all organic, natural foods does not mean that said child will continue to eat that way for the rest of their lives.

 

Sure, the seed is planted but that doesn't mean that seed can't be planted later on. Also doesn't mean the child won't completely rebel and be turned off "healthy" food.

 

I figure I just have to teach my kids the fine art of nagging. :lol::lol: (kidding!!)

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Honestly, not really for the reason you stated. :) I figure most kids will grow up and one day be mature enough to make their own decisions on how to eat. Just because one feeds their kids all organic, natural foods does not mean that said child will continue to eat that way for the rest of their lives.

 

Sure, the seed is planted but that doesn't mean that seed can't be planted later on. Also doesn't mean the child won't completely rebel and be turned off "healthy" food.

 

I figure I just have to teach my kids the fine art of nagging. :lol::lol: (kidding!!)

 

Very true. Thanks for pointing that out. I grew up on mixes and boxed food and I feed my kids completely different:)

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I think we're all free to feel any way we want about how others feed their children, but ultimately it's none of our business, unless they're feeding them broken glass or something.

 

This does remind me of a (not so) funny story. I have friend who went to visit her son and his wife out of state. She was horrified to find her dil feeding her granddaughter 5 hot dogs for lunch one day. She cut them all up on a plate with some ketchup and that was all she ate. She was about 3 yrs old. :confused:

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I don't care what other people feed their kids.

 

I heard recently an argument about how food has become America's new morality. As the traditional Judeo-Christian morality that was the standard since the beginning of our country (whether you agree with that morality or not...it was standard) is starting to erode we are replacing it with a food/health morality. The argument was very compelling. Too bad I can't replicate it here....just mention it especially in light of the recent threads. It's interesting to think about.

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No, you are not the only one.

 

I just think it's sad that people don't stop and think about what they are putting into their own bodies and their children's bodies. And I used to be like that. We used to eat quite a bit of processed foods. So I'm not at all coming from a "most holier than thou" view.

 

Part of my change comes from seeing the effects of nutrition on a placenta. It's VERY obvious when a woman eats a diet of processed foods, doesn't get enough water, etc. VERY obvious. The placenta will tell on you. ;)

 

The other part of my change came when we were dealing with some mild hyperactivity in a couple of our kids. I did some research and learned that food colorings and/or preservatives can trigger behaviors in kids. The very first day they were off food coloring it was like I had different children!!! So when I see people putting processed, dye-full, non-living foods into their carts that will eventually be in their bodies it makes me sad. And it's a bit maddening to have many of those people wonder why on earth we have SO many kids on Rx for ADD/ADHD.

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I care!:)

 

I grew up on organic home-grown food. Everything made from scratch. I remember going to a friend's house and really loving the white bread ham and cheese sandwich her mom made for us after school. It was heaven to me. As an adult looking back, Blah!

 

I left for college and lived on tv dinners, ramen, and mac and cheese.

 

I started working and discovered the joys of the hot bar at the 7-eleven.

 

I got married and was introduced to tamales and chili in a can and Minute Maid Fruit Punch.

 

I had a kid and hit myself upside the head. We now eat mostly healthy---organic, made from scratch food.

 

People change. I do think that without my guidiance my dh's palette would still be happy with canned tamales, fruit punch, and pork chops. So, I think one day your children may influence what your grandchildren eat!

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You don't have to spend a fortune to eat healthy foods.

 

No, that's very true, but what I observe in the stores around here is that the less healthy version of anything is almost always just a little cheaper. Go figure, I thought the government was trying to persuade us all to eat healthily.

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MIL and SIL decided to lecture me about how I feed my kids. My kids have food allergies but they eat well, mostly homemade. That does not fit into my MIL/SIL world view.

 

I look at my morbidly obese MIL and my pill popping SIL who both have food issues and I bit my tongue until it bleed.

 

So, yes, unless it is actual abuse, keep your opinion to yourself. It is like being witness to when you do not wish it.

 

Sorry if it is snotty, you hit a nerve with me.

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MIL and SIL decided to lecture me about how I feed my kids. My kids have food allergies but they eat well, mostly homemade. That does not fit into my MIL/SIL world view.

 

I look at my morbidly obese MIL and my pill popping SIL who both have food issues and I bit my tongue until it bleed.

 

So, yes, unless it is actual abuse, keep your opinion to yourself. It is like being witness to when you do not wish it.

 

Sorry if it is snotty, you hit a nerve with me.

 

Then well done for not saying anything! :001_smile: I'm not so good at that!

 

I think it is a different thing, to care, and to express an opinion - you know? If the reverse were true, and you were feeding your dc junk for every meal, would you mind if someone cared? Probably not too much; would you mind if they said something about it? Probably more so, depending on how they'd phrased it.

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Melissa, I don't the OP meant that everyone should voice their opinion. People are free to make their choices. I believe in that.

 

But, I can't not care...I just can't turn that part of me off emotionally. We have a family in our 4-H club in which the mom is one inch taller than I am and weighs in at 300 lbs. (I am 5'4" and she openly admitted her weight to the moms, no one brought it up or asked) and two of her four children are morbidly obese at the tender ages of 10 and 12. The 10 year old girl wear's an adult large for tops and a woman's 12 for bottoms (her mom has to shorten the pants and skirts). She openly admits that all she buys are hot dogs, chicken nuggets, frozen pizza, doughnuts, pop tarts, Lucky Charms Cereal, etc. She openly admits that her children do not eat a single vegetable or fruit and that when she goes to the pediatrician she tells him that the children eat a lot of veggies because she thinks that the pizza sauce and ketchup should count as a serving of veggies. She also knows better but says that she can't deal with the children's whining and complaining.

 

So, maybe it is rude for me to even think in my heart that I care. I have never expressed it and never will because I won't be rude to her. Maybe I'm a bad person... but I just can't NOT give a rip about those kids.

 

We've also got another boy in the club, age 12, who wears a men's size xxl and he has to hold his arms out at an odd angle to his sides because he is too wide for them to hang down properly. His mother has admitted that all he wants is junk food and even when the rest of the family is eating a well rounded meal, he gets to have chips and stuff because they don't want to deal with his attitude. Again, I wonder what his health will be like as an adult...it's hard for me not to care though I never say anything and would not offer any advice even if asked. As a 4-H leader, I know what my professional boundaries are.

 

I also understand about struggling with weight. I am overweight, though nothing like the above, due to a metabolic disorder that went undiagnosed for years and now it's just awful trying to get that weight off. But, at least we eat healthy in this house. I don't discriminate or assume anyone can easily lose weight or just because they are overweight are therefore not eating right. I know what it is like. But, I weep for the above children because if they ever want to be healthier, they won't even know where to start or how to cook. Sooooo sad.

 

Faith

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And you have to consider that some people feed their kids certain foods because that is what they can afford. I spend a lot of money on food, but if I didn't have the money I would have to eat less expensive foods (that wouldn't be as healthy). Would that make me an abusive parent?

Dh does all the grocery shopping and he shops at Walmart. There is no way our groceries are coming from Whole Foods or some spiffy organic grocery.

 

So, yes, unless it is actual abuse, keep your opinion to yourself. It is like being witness to when you do not wish it.

 

Sorry if it is snotty, you hit a nerve with me.

:iagree:You go sister. Don't tell me what to feed my kids unless you plan to pay for it, prepare it, sit with them while they eat it, and clean up. Be sure to have fun when my 120lb 17yo who needs to wear a belt to keep his 28x32 jeans from falling down has a drink and nothing else. My kids don't eat the foods they do because that is what I eat or what I offer. They eat the foods they do, because that is who they are.

 

To quote Catwoman (see I told you I would need to use this.)bolding mine-

"I have been in situations where I've had to stop at the last minute and pick up sandwiches for a homeschool group event. One time, I was only feeding myself and my ds, yet received unkind stares and comments from other moms because there was lunch meat on the sandwiches, the rolls weren't whole wheat, my son was drinking a soda (:eek:) and eating some chips.

 

It was like I'd committed a capital crime.

 

And it was none of their business.

 

I'm sorry. I didn't have a chance to milk my own goats and grind my own wheat that morning or go out to my huge organic garden and make incredibly healthy food choices like the rest of the moms obviously did.:glare: It's pretty clear that I was intentionally trying to kill my child by giving him deadly processed foods. Once.

 

But I wasn't forcing their kids to eat it.

 

My ds had an extra bag of chips and asked the mom of the kid sitting across from him if he could offer it to her son, and she acted like he'd offered to give him cyanide. (And he did ask the mom, not the kid.)

 

So that's why I'm a little sensitive to why we shouldn't tell a mom what her own kids can or can't eat."

 

 

Mandy

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To quote Catwoman (see I told you I would need to use this.)bolding mine-

"I have been in situations where I've had to stop at the last minute and pick up sandwiches for a homeschool group event. One time, I was only feeding myself and my ds, yet received unkind stares and comments from other moms because there was lunch meat on the sandwiches, the rolls weren't whole wheat, my son was drinking a soda (:eek:) and eating some chips.

 

It was like I'd committed a capital crime.

 

And it was none of their business.

 

I'm sorry. I didn't have a chance to milk my own goats and grind my own wheat that morning or go out to my huge organic garden and make incredibly healthy food choices like the rest of the moms obviously did.:glare: It's pretty clear that I was intentionally trying to kill my child by giving him deadly processed foods. Once.

 

But I wasn't forcing their kids to eat it.

 

My ds had an extra bag of chips and asked the mom of the kid sitting across from him if he could offer it to her son, and she acted like he'd offered to give him cyanide. (And he did ask the mom, not the kid.)

 

So that's why I'm a little sensitive to why we shouldn't tell a mom what her own kids can or can't eat."

 

 

Mandy

 

 

I just sit there and laugh.... most of them have 1 or two younger children. Yes, there, I said it. (ducking....) A) Only one or two to worry about and B) Have not been jaded by the reality of needing an occasionally bad meal due to two sports in one night, or a 5-9 Boy Scout meeting.

 

I think some perspective is lost in cases like the above. We are whole wheat, non-hydrogenated fat avoiders, and we do a pretty good job of eating healthy. I wish I could/would do more, but this is reality for us.

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I think a lot of people care, including me. However, I keep my mouth shut:D But yes - sometimes it takes biting my tongue until it bleeds as well!

 

I care, too. But it's not my place to say anything. I will tell you, though - when I see a toddler out in public with soda in a baby bottle and Cheeto dust smeared all over his face, and he's complaining because he's hungry for lunch (or dinner), and the parent says something like "but, Johnny, you just had Cheetos," it really, really irks me. And while I'd like to say a whole bunch of things, I don't because it is ultimately none of my business; I just come home and complain about it.

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I care that as a society we don't seem to understand our food choices and that so many people make poor ones and that the economy seems to support those poor choices by making unhealthy food so incredibly cheap and convenient while many healthier foods are more expensive.

 

On the other hand, do I care about individual people that I might see eating or feeding their kids? No. Because it's none of my business and because I've only seen a few tiny moments from their lives. You don't know what else they eat. And even if I knew them well, it would still be none of my business. People have to change their own behavior.

 

Also, it's such a slippery slope. To me, getting our vegetables, avoiding too much processed foods and trying to be healthy is enough. To others, you need to eat organic and have zero processed foods ever. To others, you need to be vegetarian or vegan. Or you need to never let your food touch plastic. It just goes on and on.

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I don't care what other people feed their kids.

 

I heard recently an argument about how food has become America's new morality. .

 

Not only for humans. I've visited pet forums before and from reading there you'd be sure you were killing a pet by not feeding it premium food.

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Yes, I care, but no, it is not my right to dictate what other families should be feeding their children. As long as they are not abusing their children by starving them, who am I to question their choices?

 

There are several Seventh Day Adventist families in our homeschooling circle, some Mormons, and a few others who have what are generally considered to be "healthy eating habits". And honestly, I have not noticed them to be all that much healthier than the other families. Some of their kids still have allergies, they still get colds and flu, the adults have health issues. Although they seem to have less of a problem with obesity, it is not totally absent.

 

In one case, the mother is a wonderful woman who has totally devoted her life to the health and wellbeing of her 3 sons. She was the healthiest, best, most "organic" cook I have ever met. Unfortunately, at least one of them has a serious, secret addiction to junk food. I know this because when we used to stop by their house to visit after I had made a run to town for groceries, he would actually bribe my then 6yo dd to let him into our car where he would search the bags for any treats and then manipulate her into opening and sharing them with him.

 

I would no more question others' food choices as I would their discipline, academic, religious, or other standards. That is personal and for me to presume to tell them my way is right and theirs wrong would be inappropriate.

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I guess I'd get more fired up about this topic if I didn't know three (THREE) extremely healthy eaters, in the past five years, one of whom died from pancreatic cancer, and the other two are battling colon cancer. I think I'll save all my ammunition for the smokers, and leave the unhealthy eaters alone.

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Just because one feeds their kids all organic, natural foods does not mean that said child will continue to eat that way for the rest of their lives.

 

 

 

:iagree:

I was raised on a natural, whole foods diet. No preservatives, no additives, etc. Mainly to try and help with my brothers ADHD but I had to tag along for the ride. I try to eat fairly healthy and feed my kids healthy but I love all the foods I never had as a child - Lucky Charms is my secret shame. :D

 

I try to feed my kids healthier because it's healthier but I don't believe they will necessarily keep it up when they are adults.

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Yes, I care. I don't think it is bad to care. There is a big difference between caring and offering advice, information, etc., if asked and confronting someone. If a mother said something along the lines of "Oh, I wish my dc would eat that" if they saw my dc eating broccoli, I might offer a few suggestions. But I wouldn't bring it up myself. Some parents honestly don't know how to begin to change their diet and want advice. I certainly wouldn't just walk up to some lady at the park feeding her kids fast food and go off on her. :) And I wouldn't even bring it up to a friend unless she wanted advice.

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I care. I don't think it's my business and I wouldn't presume to comment, but I care.

 

It troubles me. I know way too many people who had to become seriously ill (myself included) before they changed their eating habits. It doesn't need to be that way. It bothers me that sometimes people really don't seem to see an obvious connection between poor nutrition and health/behaviour problems. Or just refuse to believe it.

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I care when I see kids living off of chicken nuggets and cheese doodles. Then, I offer to babysit :D

 

I do care when the food seems really terrible, but for the most part, as long as they're making some attempt at fruits and veggies I'm just glad they can still afford to feed their children, what with the economy and all.

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I have enough to worry about with what my own children eat to spend too much time worrying about others. I do the best I can but I am not a perfect parent and I am sure there are others passing judgment on me and my kids at times. One major reason I quit going to homeschool groups is that I felt too many people spent too much time passing judgment on others for the parenting, curriculum, too Catholic, not Catholic enough. I would rather just live in my bubble.

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I care in a vague, general sense. I mean, it really hurts my heart when I see very large children being given very lousy food. But I also try hard to remember that I don't know what goes on in their homes 24/7, no matter how obvious it may seem.

My own kids get, on average, 1 soda a week, which some people would consider excessive (I obviously don't) and that's the only beverage certain people have ever seen my kids drink (because of the time and place). It says nothing about what goes on in our home, kwim?

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So true. Talking about food with people these days is like talking about religion. In fact, I've had nastier discussions about food than religion.

 

:iagree: and obviously, it's frustrating to me.:D Food has become a royal PITA issue in just about any social situation these days. And that is frustrating.

 

I care in the sense of I have an opinion and that opinion might differ from theirs.

 

I don't think it is my business to interfere.

 

As long as they are using their manners and for the most part folks are happy - it's all good to me. Even if they aren't, I'm more likely to just move on, than make a stink.

 

If I'm the odd duck not happy with the food, I shut my mouth and eat elsewhere.

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Yes, I care. I don't think it is bad to care. There is a big difference between caring and offering advice, information, etc., if asked and confronting someone. If a mother said something along the lines of "Oh, I wish my dc would eat that" if they saw my dc eating broccoli, I might offer a few suggestions. But I wouldn't bring it up myself. Some parents honestly don't know how to begin to change their diet and want advice. I certainly wouldn't just walk up to some lady at the park feeding her kids fast food and go off on her. :) And I wouldn't even bring it up to a friend unless she wanted advice.

:iagree:

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Yes, I care. I don't think it is bad to care. There is a big difference between caring and offering advice, information, etc., if asked and confronting someone. If a mother said something along the lines of "Oh, I wish my dc would eat that" if they saw my dc eating broccoli, I might offer a few suggestions. But I wouldn't bring it up myself. Some parents honestly don't know how to begin to change their diet and want advice. I certainly wouldn't just walk up to some lady at the park feeding her kids fast food and go off on her. :) And I wouldn't even bring it up to a friend unless she wanted advice.

 

:iagree: totally!

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I have enough to worry about with what my own children eat to spend too much time worrying about others. I do the best I can but I am not a perfect parent and I am sure there are others passing judgment on me and my kids at times. One major reason I quit going to homeschool groups is that I felt too many people spent too much time passing judgment on others for the parenting, curriculum, too Catholic, not Catholic enough. I would rather just live in my bubble.

 

This.

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I have enough to worry about with what my own children eat to spend too much time worrying about others. I do the best I can but I am not a perfect parent and I am sure there are others passing judgment on me and my kids at times. One major reason I quit going to homeschool groups is that I felt too many people spent too much time passing judgment on others for the parenting, curriculum, too Catholic, not Catholic enough. I would rather just live in my bubble.

:iagree:

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And you have to consider that some people feed their kids certain foods because that is what they can afford. I spend a lot of money on food, but if I didn't have the money I would have to eat less expensive foods (that wouldn't be as healthy). Would that make me an abusive parent?

 

I read a book by Marilu Henner once, and she said in it, "I just can't understand what a parent is thinking when they let their child eat little fish crackers! Don't they know that there are good, organic substitutes that they could get for their children?!" (not a direct quote, the book is long gone :001_smile:)

 

I was really annoyed, read it to dh, and then said, "They're thinking, 'that tiny box of organic crackers that my two children would eat in two seconds is $5 a box at a special store, and a thing of Goldfish is $1!" Although, that was quite a while ago, and I have noticed recently that Goldfish have really gone up in price.

 

Don't sit around making judgments about other people, please. I'm sure that if you raise your children perfectly enough, they will only choose perfect people for their mates and you won't have to worry about what they feed your grandchildren! :D

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I care in a vague, general sense. I mean, it really hurts my heart when I see very large children being given very lousy food. But I also try hard to remember that I don't know what goes on in their homes 24/7, no matter how obvious it may seem.

My own kids get, on average, 1 soda a week, which some people would consider excessive (I obviously don't) and that's the only beverage certain people have ever seen my kids drink (because of the time and place). It says nothing about what goes on in our home, kwim?

 

I was thinking about this just last week. I was shopping a 2-day sale at a store just for the sale items and some things I wanted double coupons on. This wasn't my usual grocery shopping, but it was stocking up, and it included soda (for holiday entertaining, not for our dc), but no milk because every time I buy milk from this store it spoils quickly. I had plenty of the cheese and bacon from the sale, and not a single piece of produce. I had Hershey kisses for making peanut butter blossoms, plus bakery items that I usually make from scratch, but found to be cheaper with the sale. The cart was essentially full of junk! Now I knew that this was not what we were going to be living on for the next week, but how many times have I glanced into another shopper's cart and made a judgment (and not a nice one) about what I saw there? When we eat out, roughly every 6 weeks, I do let my kids have a lemonade and fries, and how is anyone watching us to know whether that's a rare treat or a daily event?

 

On the other hand, it does upset me when I see really heavy kids with sodas in their hands (or sippy cups!). I am always shocked by parents complaining about their kids' health or behavioral problems while the children sit nearby eating food full of artificial crud.

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Yes, I care deeply. It is one of the issues I would love to have more influence over. I see skinny kids being fed up on sugar and junk food daily because they "need the calories" and I want to tell the parents that those kids will not necessarily have a fast metabolism when they are 35 and if you dont teach them to eat healthy food now, they could well have health problems later. I see kids with dark rings under their eyes eating bad food and on drugs for ADHD or allergies when there are obviously dietary issues. SOmetimes I am surprised how ignorant people are when so much information is so freely available now.

There are young adult men who have an influence on my teenage son who virtually live on protein drinks full of chemicals and sugar. Yes, I care, and I talk to him about it.

I have a very, very dear friend who is very overweight and who says he wants to lose weight while eating 2-3 times as much as a normal adult- all "healthy" food- gallons of raw milk, huge bowls of "healthy" food- just way, way too much. He cant understand when he is eating such healthy food, why he cant lose weight.

 

I care- as a mother I care way beyond my own children...but that doesn't mean I think it is my business to change anyone or even educate them. I just live my own truth and I am not perfect, but people often ask me questions or enjoy what i bring to a pot luck. I love talking about food and health issues. So I prefer to live it rather than preach it to anyone who hasnt asked. (Apart from my kids....I am very preachy to them :) Oh, and dh. :) )

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about what other parents feed their kids?

 

These are the men and women who will marry my kids and feed my grandchildren.

 

 

duck.gif

 

It's human nature to want everyone to be like oneself whether that be in food choices, religion choices, curricula choices or anything else. Your views just show you're human (and so am I, of course).

 

What needs to happen for the world to peacefully exist is to recognize we are all human and learn to tolerate (well) those who choose otherwise regarding topics such as foods. To do this, I always switch the train of thinking. Would I want MY choices regulated out (no matter how healthy they are) or looked down upon or forbidden? Since my answer is always, "no," I've taught my brain that others can do as they please without condemnation from me.

 

That said, I hope my son doesn't marry someone who is "healthy only" in their eating... nor "unhealthy only..." as I'm a person firmly in the middle and I'd like to see my grandkids raised the same. :D That said, I'll love my dil and grandkids no matter what they eat.

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In one case, the mother is a wonderful woman who has totally devoted her life to the health and wellbeing of her 3 sons. She was the healthiest, best, most "organic" cook I have ever met. Unfortunately, at least one of them has a serious, secret addiction to junk food. I know this because when we used to stop by their house to visit after I had made a run to town for groceries, he would actually bribe my then 6yo dd to let him into our car where he would search the bags for any treats and then manipulate her into opening and sharing them with him.

 

.

 

Some children have a serious addiction to junk food whether the parents devote their life to the health of their kids or whether they deliberately give them soda in sippy cups, candy snacks and processed food.

 

My own son would eat nothing but junk if I let him. When he goes over to a our neighbors house, he loves that they have a kitchen drawer full of junk and he will eat it until he is stuffed. My neighbor thinks that my ds is so deprived :rolleyes: at our house that he has an addiction to junk food because of it.

When a friend of mine came to pick up her kids at my house, she had a giant bag of AirHeads in the car and my son acted like he had never been so happy in his life. I'm sure the mom thought if I just kept AirHeads in the house then my ds wouldn't raid her car for them. Wrong! He could have had airheads for breakfast and would still want them when she showed up.

 

I do cook from scratch, make my kids eat a balanced meal at mealtimes but we also bake cookies or cupcakes, go out for ice cream, and I let them have the lolly pop from the bank or whatever. I consider that pretty normal and yet my son would run to your car (secretly even) and look for bags of treats with your dd if he though you had them. I can't give my son free access to candy and bags of cookies, etc. because he would abuse it.

My dd6 on the other hand doesn't really care! If you rolled up and my kids both knew you went shopping and may have treats, my dd wouldn't ask for one, wouldn't sneak one, but may take one if you offered and only eat one bite.

 

I feel like when my ds7 acts crazy about junk food people are making a judgment that he is not able to control himself around junk food because he is forbidden to have it! (Which, as I already said is not true! I know people think that because they have actually told me that they think that's the reason ds like to stuff himself with junk :ack2: )

 

Sorry I turned your comment into All About Me, lol but I hear that often enough actually directed at me! :eek:

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This thread reminds me of a letter I got from a newbie school nurse at my special needs son's school commenting on his daily lunches (grape jam on wheat bread, red apple, juice drink, chocolate pudding cup. EVERY DAY) and detailing how by coloring mustard or mayo in vibrant colors I could make cool lunch meat sandwiches my son would LOVE!

 

Er, nurse? This kid has autism and MAJOR food dislikes (color, texture, etc. - he is so picky!) and will not eat eggs, peanut butter, meat, fish, hot dogs - he does like plain white rice (hot) or plain steamed kasha (buckwheat groats) but it has to be freshly made off the stove or he will not eat it. I am lucky I found ANYTHING I could put in a lunchbag that he would eat!

 

He got, and still has, a big glass of milk mixed with Instant Breakfast and a whey isolate protein powder - both chocolate flavored - towards bedtime. I figured it at 60 grams of protein in the glass! Plus he gets calcium pill in the morning and a multivitamin at night.

 

But if you judged his diet by what few, odd things he eats during the day -!!!

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I care. I don't say anything, I don't judge, but I care.

 

Of course, I raised a child who decided not to take a particular girl, very nice, to the prom because her family values were too different from ours. "It just wouldn't work out," he said. I told him, "Honey, it's just a few hours, not a lifetime!" So, yeah. I think he'll end up with someone whose food values (and concerns about the larger social justice issues with food choices) are similar to ours.

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I am sure if most of you looked in my pantry you would be deciding if my poor innocent children should remain in this "abusive" household. Yes you can care, but you have to keep it to yourself. I buy what I can afford, I shop at Walmart or the no name store for all of our groceries. With 5 of us to feed, working until 6 pm at night with a 30 minute commute home etc we eat a lot of processed/boxed foods. I do buy lots of fruits and veggies, but honestly with the boys eating so so much at any meal I can not afford to do all organic, and due to time constraints of working and schooling and appts and everything else I do not have time for all scratch. So yes my pantry has cream of whatever soups to make tuna casserole, and canned ragu, and hamburger helper. That does not mean that everything the kids eat is boxed, but it sure does make life easier, and if someone had the nerve to comment on it claiming that I was doing harm to my kids by feeding them that way I would be probably ready to hit them with my frying pan. You have no clue about the dynamics of a family and why they eat certain things or feed their kids those things. I know plenty about nutrition, and I know that organic from scratch foods are healthier, but until someone invents a 36 hour day, doubles my salary and can pick up some of the slack at home the kids will eat the box, processed stuff and I will feel satisfied that they are going to bed with a full stomach every night, not just for 2 weeks of the month when I had the money for organic.

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I care and here is one reason why:

 

http://www.nj.com/news/index.ssf/2010/04/us_military_obesity_a_matter_o.html

 

here's another:

http://www.winfieldcourier.com/articles/2010/12/11/opinion/wnh_weekend_check-up/doc4d036f3bdb2a2872946068.txt

 

and there are countless other reasons why I care. However, I care on a macro level, I'm not going to be eyeing every morsel you feed your child but do I think what people are feeding their children is a huge issue, YES. We in the US and many other countries have a huge problem that is directly related to food consumption.

 

Do I understand that many people are shopping at not ideal grocery stores, with little money and have time constraints, absolutely, in fact I have similar problems however I think that it would behoove everybody if we all cared just a little bit more. Maybe we can't have perfect food but we can make better choices, we can make good eating a priority and advocate for better food. I'm an idealist on issues that seem important to me and this one does. It just isn't a good idea to have a society where many decide that it's ok to feed our kids junk because it's easy or quick or blindly use the excuse it's all I can afford (unless it truly is because let's face it sometimes it is hard to find "good" food on a budget, yeh, I've tried, it's harder than the books/commentators let on, sometimes it's down right impossible and I get that)

 

So in short, I care what you are feeding your kid but I care more how advertisers for complete junk target kids, how lobbies for things like corn syrup try to change the name to sidestep the negative but pretty honest critiques the product has gotten, etc etc etc. I think more support among parents and less judgment would be helpful.

Edited by lula
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No, you are not the only one.

 

I just think it's sad that people don't stop and think about what they are putting into their own bodies and their children's bodies. And I used to be like that. We used to eat quite a bit of processed foods. So I'm not at all coming from a "most holier than thou" view.

 

Part of my change comes from seeing the effects of nutrition on a placenta. It's VERY obvious when a woman eats a diet of processed foods, doesn't get enough water, etc. VERY obvious. The placenta will tell on you. ;)

 

The other part of my change came when we were dealing with some mild hyperactivity in a couple of our kids. I did some research and learned that food colorings and/or preservatives can trigger behaviors in kids. The very first day they were off food coloring it was like I had different children!!! So when I see people putting processed, dye-full, non-living foods into their carts that will eventually be in their bodies it makes me sad. And it's a bit maddening to have many of those people wonder why on earth we have SO many kids on Rx for ADD/ADHD.

:iagree:

 

I, for one, never mentioned organic, or all from scratch foods.

 

I don't say to things to people but it does makes me sad when "froot by the furlong" is considered food.

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