Jump to content

Menu

Gluten-free holidays...?


Recommended Posts

My husband was recently diagnosed with food allergies including all gluten-containing grains. For the most part we just skip baked goods now, but with the holidays coming up I know he's a little bummed about missing out on all our usual food-related traditions.

 

I have allergies myself and I'm a pretty experienced cook, but baking without gluten grains is new to me and I can't seem to get any decent results. I also can't rely on store-bought mixes etc because they're all full of CORN, which we're ALL allergic to. :glare:

 

Any tips from the more experienced gluten-free folks? We're fine with eggs and dairy.

 

If I could even manage to figure out something for a pie crust and some decent cookies, that would be AWESOME.

 

Thanks in advance!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, that is tricky without the corn! I can't have wheat, but do use corn in lots of things. I make a pumpkin custard in place of pumpkin pie, glazed pecans instead of pecan pie, apple crisp with oat topping in place of apple pie, and I know a gf family that uses the gf version of rice krispies plus lots of fun sprinkles to make holiday treats in place of cookies.

 

I just asked a friend about pie crust yesterday and this is her response:

 

For one crust, 1/2 cup butter, 4 oz cream cheese, 1 cup GF flour (I use Pamela's mix, but it won't matter much what you use -- plain rice might be a little flavorless, though), pulse in the food processor until it just makes a ball (if you don't have a processor, I think you could do this with a pastry blender). Pat into the pan, making sure to keep it at or below the level of the top of the pan as it will "melt" slightly when it first starts to bake. Cover the edge with foil as it browns faster than regular crust. If you need a top crust, double the recipe and chill the half you're going to roll out before attempting to roll. Put a TON of flour on the counter before you roll -- it will probably stick some anyway, and you might have to put it on in pieces, but you'll get the pie covered. Again, keep it inside the pan or it will drip into the oven.

 

It's not "real" crust, but it tastes a ton better than any other GF crust I've had. It has a kind of crumbly, shortbready texture

 

I haven't tried it yet, though -- it does sound sort of tricky and I do like the pumpkin custard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It might be too late to get it for Thanksgiving but I have been using Mama's Almond Blend from Gluten Free Mama. You can substitute it cup for cup with all purpose flour and I have had awesome results when cooking for for my GF friends.

 

It's not Thanksgiving for us (Canadian)...I'm thinking more for Christmas! Thanks so much for the suggestion!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, that is tricky without the corn! I can't have wheat, but do use corn in lots of things. I make a pumpkin custard in place of pumpkin pie, glazed pecans instead of pecan pie, apple crisp with oat topping in place of apple pie, and I know a gf family that uses the gf version of rice krispies plus lots of fun sprinkles to make holiday treats in place of cookies.

 

I just asked a friend about pie crust yesterday and this is her response:

 

For one crust, 1/2 cup butter, 4 oz cream cheese, 1 cup GF flour (I use Pamela's mix, but it won't matter much what you use -- plain rice might be a little flavorless, though), pulse in the food processor until it just makes a ball (if you don't have a processor, I think you could do this with a pastry blender). Pat into the pan, making sure to keep it at or below the level of the top of the pan as it will "melt" slightly when it first starts to bake. Cover the edge with foil as it browns faster than regular crust. If you need a top crust, double the recipe and chill the half you're going to roll out before attempting to roll. Put a TON of flour on the counter before you roll -- it will probably stick some anyway, and you might have to put it on in pieces, but you'll get the pie covered. Again, keep it inside the pan or it will drip into the oven.

 

It's not "real" crust, but it tastes a ton better than any other GF crust I've had. It has a kind of crumbly, shortbready texture

 

I haven't tried it yet, though -- it does sound sort of tricky and I do like the pumpkin custard.

 

Yup, corn is the one that leaves you floundering, lol! I'm allergic to corn and totally used to doing without it, but I've never had to be wheat-free...which seems to rely a lot on corn. So annoying! :tongue_smilie:

 

Thank you SO MUCH for the pie crust advice! I think he was the saddest about missing pumpkin pie, so I'm going to try this for sure!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, that is tricky without the corn! I can't have wheat, but do use corn in lots of things. I make a pumpkin custard in place of pumpkin pie, glazed pecans instead of pecan pie, apple crisp with oat topping in place of apple pie, and I know a gf family that uses the gf version of rice krispies plus lots of fun sprinkles to make holiday treats in place of cookies.

 

I just asked a friend about pie crust yesterday and this is her response:

 

For one crust, 1/2 cup butter, 4 oz cream cheese, 1 cup GF flour (I use Pamela's mix, but it won't matter much what you use -- plain rice might be a little flavorless, though), pulse in the food processor until it just makes a ball (if you don't have a processor, I think you could do this with a pastry blender). Pat into the pan, making sure to keep it at or below the level of the top of the pan as it will "melt" slightly when it first starts to bake. Cover the edge with foil as it browns faster than regular crust. If you need a top crust, double the recipe and chill the half you're going to roll out before attempting to roll. Put a TON of flour on the counter before you roll -- it will probably stick some anyway, and you might have to put it on in pieces, but you'll get the pie covered. Again, keep it inside the pan or it will drip into the oven.

 

It's not "real" crust, but it tastes a ton better than any other GF crust I've had. It has a kind of crumbly, shortbready texture

 

I haven't tried it yet, though -- it does sound sort of tricky and I do like the pumpkin custard.

 

Oooh, thanks for this! I've seen recipes, but it really helps to have a recipe someone trusts.

 

For cookies, I haven't managed to come up with a chocolate chip cookie I like, but I've made these, and they're HEAVENLY:

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=172313

 

You'd never know they were GF, and you could eat them warm with some ice cream and whipped cream...yum! Actually, now I'm dying to make these now :lol: The closest I've come to a chocolate chip cookie I love is these:

 

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/the-chewy-gluten-free-recipe/index.html

 

I left half the dough in the fridge overnight and then baked more, and they were even better. Maybe the flour softens a bit? I don't know. I just know it worked pretty well :D

 

HTH!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You need to check out everydaypaleo.com. She has a complete Thanksgiving meal that is grain/gluten free.

 

We just started the Paleo Diet which amounts to eating a hunter/gatherer type diet. No grains, legumes, or dairy. Just good ole meat, veggies, nuts, fruit and good fats. The changes in our physical health is incredible.

 

A great book to read is "The Paleo Solution" by Robb Wolf. He goes into all the technical aspects of how foods affect your body. It was a real eye opener for us.

 

edited to add: on everydaypaleo, she has a recipe for Paleo Pumkin Pie and two cookie recipes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/

 

Click on her recipes tab. I've made several of her baked goods and they are always good. I do use less starch and more whole grains than she does, though (for ex. when she calls for tapioca starch I use one of my gluten free flours, cup for cup, or ounce for ounce, if weighing). I just made her gluten free pie crust and it rolled out so nicely! It is in the oven right now with pumpkin filling, so I can't say how it will be when finished, but the crust I tried last year was all crumbly.

 

Once you've done some gluten free baking, it becomes pretty easy to just substitute gluten free grains for regular. I highly second her recommendation to get a baking scale. I did and use it all the time.

 

I order all my gluten free grains from Bob's Red Mill. I can find some of them locally, but it's easier for me just to order everything at once and have them delivered.

 

If you have more questions, just ask!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

http://www.glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/

 

Click on her recipes tab. I've made several of her baked goods and they are always good. I do use less starch and more whole grains than she does' date=' though (for ex. when she calls for tapioca starch I use one of my gluten free flours, cup for cup, or ounce for ounce, if weighing). I just made her gluten free pie crust and it rolled out so nicely! It is in the oven right now with pumpkin filling, so I can't say how it will be when finished, but the crust I tried last year was all crumbly.

 

Once you've done some gluten free baking, it becomes pretty easy to just substitute gluten free grains for regular. I highly second her recommendation to get a baking scale. I did and use it all the time.

 

I order all my gluten free grains from Bob's Red Mill. I can find some of them locally, but it's easier for me just to order everything at once and have them delivered.

 

If you have more questions, just ask![/quote']

 

Thanks! Let us know how the pie turns out with that crust recipe!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had really good results with pie crust by just subbing GF flours for regular flours, and pressing into the tin rather than rolling out. Usually I use a mix of Sorghum, Tapioca and Potato flours, with xanthan gum. But I find that a range of mixes will work OK.

 

Some recipes I like:

http://giantsweettooth.blogspot.com/2009/05/flaky-lemon-shortbread.html I needed more flour than the recipe said, this is the weirdest recipe, but it turned out so good!

http://glutenfreeislife.wordpress.com/2008/10/23/snickerdoodles/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, corn is the one that leaves you floundering, lol! I'm allergic to corn and totally used to doing without it, but I've never had to be wheat-free...which seems to rely a lot on corn. So annoying! :tongue_smilie:

 

Thank you SO MUCH for the pie crust advice! I think he was the saddest about missing pumpkin pie, so I'm going to try this for sure!

 

If you can find a GF flour blend (like pancake mix) that doesn't have the corn in it, I have a great crustless GF pumpkin pie recipe I can share with you. PM me if you want the recipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've had a difficult time finding recipes for bake goods as so many have a "gluten-free" aftertaste.

 

This box mix makes an excellent carrot cake (we add an extra 1/4 cup of grated carrots to the recipe). All the ingredients are organic.

 

We love these cookies made with the box mix:

 

Pumpkin Spice Cookies

1 box of Simply Organic Carrot Cake

1 can pumpkin

1/2 bag of milk chocolate chips

 

Mix and bake as cookies at 350* for about 15 minutes or until done.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our house is gluten free.

 

Tomorrow we are having:

Turkey--fresh (frozen can be problem, but I do have a list of gf frozen turkeys) dh found a great deal on the fresh turkey too

sweet potatoes

roasted root vegetables with thyme

creamed spinach

basic green salad

pumpkin bread (Rebecca Reilly's Gluten Free Baking book)

cranberry sauce

apple pie (crust recipe from Rebecca Reilly)

pumpkin pie (living without coconut pumpkin pie recipe)

 

I recommend going to the library and checking out gluten free baking books. Find one you like. I really like Rebecca Reilly's book. She was one of the first trained chefs who wrote a baking book. She understands the chemistry of baking. In the beginning of her book she has a flour mix recipe. I generally use this flour mix in all baking recipes regardless of what is called for (I can't measure 4 different flours into every recipe). There are new books. I have one called Gluten Free Baking Classics, that all the recipes I've tried have turned out. So, my suggestion is to borrow a cookbook and try a couple of recipes a week and you will begin to feel comfortable with baking and you will have a couple of recipes to use for the holiday.

 

"In your free time" (you know when you aren't homeschooling;) ) there are lots and lots of gluten free blogs which have recipes too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have found the book Wheat-Free Recipes and Menus really helpful. The recipes are simple to follow and delicious. Most use a baking mix you mix yourself using some combination of rice, corn, potato, tapioca, bean, and sogrum flours or starches (there are three mix choices), and most recipes that call for corn starch say that potato starch can be substituted. I have also been able to substitute soy flour for tapioca or corn flour in the mixes successfully.

 

We are having Thanksgiving dinner at my bil's house tomorrow, and we are bringing all gf/df foods so that my dh will have something to eat. So far, everything looks great and tastes yummy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like someone mentioned above, I'm on a Specific Carbohydrate Diet, similar to the Paleo Diet with my son. No grains, no dairy, no processed sugars.

 

One of my current favorite snacks is SCD almond muffins:

2 1/2 c. almond flour

1/2 c. honey

3 eggs

1/4 c. yogurt or melted butter

1/2 tsp baking soda

 

whisk together honey & eggs until well-blended. Add almond flour & baking soda. Add yogurt or butter slowly while mixing until batter consistency is reached.

Bake in greased muffin cups at 350 for 12-15 minutes.

 

If you check out the book Breaking the Vicious Cycle from your library, half of it contains other good grain-free recipes.

 

I'm not sure what to tell you about Christmas cookies and pies and all the other silly stuff we eat during the Holidays. I feel so *well* now that I don't miss those things. I'd rather snack on fruit if given the choice. But I understand missing those traditions too. Hopefully you'll find something to help make his holidays special. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gluten-Free 101 cookbook by Carol Fenster, Ph.D.

 

I like this cookbook but sometimes I will change the recipe the 2nd time I use it.

 

The flour blend I use with these recipes (I don't use hers):

6 cups white rice flour

2 cups potato starch

1 cup tapioca flour

 

Add 1 teaspoon Guar Gum to each 1 cup of flour used when baking.

 

I just made the choc. chip cookies and they turned out great! I kept the dough in the refrig. overnight. Everyone liked them.

 

I've made chocolate cakes that are delicious "Not" from this cookbook.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A friend who has celiac (as does her daughter) baked some gluten-free french bread and will use that for dressing/stuffing. I don't know if it has corn, though; I'll ask her (she also has extreme dairy and tropical-oil allergies, as in she'll have a stroke if she eats anything with dairy or tropical oils). She buys mixes for her breads.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you SO MUCH for the pie crust advice! I think he was the saddest about missing pumpkin pie, so I'm going to try this for sure!

I haven't gotten through the whole thread, but wanted to say that pumpkin pie is really good without crust too. I have a pumpkin pie (with crust) in the oven, and the extra pumpkin mix is in a casserole dish (no crust) in the oven too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Bette Hagman's flour blend (she has several, but this is the one I use). It is 2 cups of white rice flour, 2/3 cup of potato starch flour (not the same thing as potato flour) and 1/3 cup of tapioca flour. I sub it in for just about any recipe and make wonderful baked goods.

 

This year, I made gf dressing, two pumpkin pies with gf crust (gluten free pantry makes a good pie crust), gf rolls and a gf chocolate cake. Most of the people who will be eating it are gluten eaters, and I guarantee you they will like the food.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't gotten through the whole thread, but wanted to say that pumpkin pie is really good without crust too. I have a pumpkin pie (with crust) in the oven, and the extra pumpkin mix is in a casserole dish (no crust) in the oven too.

 

:iagree: A family member made individual no-crust pumpkin pies for me and my son last night, in little ramekins. It was SOOOOO good!! My mother-in-law is doing part of her apple pie without the crust today - I'm sure it will just be like baked apples, but still tasty with a little slice of melted cheddar cheese on top. I don't know why I didn't think about just making the pies without the crust.

 

I just remembered that I made a wonderful batch of snickerdoodles last year from Bette Hagman's Gluten-Free Gourmet book. They still had that little GF tang to them, but they were gone in no time here.

 

Carol Fenster also has a flour blend using sorghum flour (which I think tastes wonderful, it's more like wheat).

1 1/2 cups sorghum flour

1/1/2 cups potato starch

1 cup tapioca flour

1/2 cup corn flour* , chestnut flour, or bean flour

I bet you could use almond flour in place of the corn flour, considering it's about the same consistency.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, that is tricky without the corn! I can't have wheat, but do use corn in lots of things. I make a pumpkin custard in place of pumpkin pie, glazed pecans instead of pecan pie, apple crisp with oat topping in place of apple pie, and I know a gf family that uses the gf version of rice krispies plus lots of fun sprinkles to make holiday treats in place of cookies.

 

I just asked a friend about pie crust yesterday and this is her response:

 

For one crust, 1/2 cup butter, 4 oz cream cheese, 1 cup GF flour (I use Pamela's mix, but it won't matter much what you use -- plain rice might be a little flavorless, though), pulse in the food processor until it just makes a ball (if you don't have a processor, I think you could do this with a pastry blender). Pat into the pan, making sure to keep it at or below the level of the top of the pan as it will "melt" slightly when it first starts to bake. Cover the edge with foil as it browns faster than regular crust. If you need a top crust, double the recipe and chill the half you're going to roll out before attempting to roll. Put a TON of flour on the counter before you roll -- it will probably stick some anyway, and you might have to put it on in pieces, but you'll get the pie covered. Again, keep it inside the pan or it will drip into the oven.

 

It's not "real" crust, but it tastes a ton better than any other GF crust I've had. It has a kind of crumbly, shortbready texture

 

I haven't tried it yet, though -- it does sound sort of tricky and I do like the pumpkin custard.

 

 

Ok, so we're doing our big Thanksgiving thing tomorrow, cooking tonight. DH is allergic to wheat and I'm looking for a pie crust recipe. This one looks good but we have no cream cheese. Any suggestions for a substitute or an alternative? DH is considering modifying a pizza crust recipe on the fly - they both have the word "crust" in them, you see...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

from Gluten Free Girls's website had wonderful texture, but I would not use the teff flour again; it has a strong taste that I don't like. I would make it just as she did only substituting sorghum flour for the teff.

 

As a side note, have you tried Udi's bread? It's the best gluten free bread I've tried. It's best toasted. It's not available everywhere, but my grocery store does carry it. You might have to ask or search. I found it in the cooler near the bakery where they keep all the cakes. :confused: Some of the employees didn't even know they carried it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I haven't read all of the replies, but when J was GF (and he was GF for over 5yrs) I made a GF and even CF (casein free) pumpkin roll *every* year. It was sooooo good. I just took my normal pumpkin roll recipe and changed out the flour cup for cup, increased my baking powder and baking soda by 50% and added 1tsp of guar gum or xanthum gum per cup of flour (if the flour did not have it in already) and YUMMY!!!!:D

 

We did pumpkin pie without the crust, since no matter what crust I tried to bake, it would have held up to a Nuclear attack.

 

The only thing I never made GF was stuffing or dressing-just wasn't the same. J now *adores* traditional southern dressing and refuses that "other stuff".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had really good results with pie crust by just subbing GF flours for regular flours, and pressing into the tin rather than rolling out. Usually I use a mix of Sorghum, Tapioca and Potato flours, with xanthan gum.

 

This is what I did too. We were GF for 9 years. Pie crust is a breeze. Most things that just use a small amount of flour, just subbing a starch like potato or tapioca (since you can't have corn) works just fine. I found yeast rolls even come out pretty well with whatever your favorite flour sub is. Just don't punch them down. Only ONE rise for GF baked goods! If you need any specific recipes, feel free to email me. I always fed my entire extended family GF for thanksgiving. It was easier than having things ds couldn't eat. Everyone loved it, no exceptions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I generally keep grain free, so do basic dishes. Sweet potato casserole topped w/ nuts and butter. Sauteed green beans- so they actually taste like green beans! Crustless pumpkin pie, no sense in wasting time and effort on something most people don't really like anyway! I did roasted parsnips and carrots w/ an orange juice glaze and some dressing made w/ grain-free almond flour bread from Elana's pantry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had really good results with pie crust by just subbing GF flours for regular flours, and pressing into the tin rather than rolling out. Usually I use a mix of Sorghum, Tapioca and Potato flours, with xanthan gum. But I find that a range of mixes will work OK.

 

Somehow it never occurred to me to try pressing dough into the pie plate instead of rolling. That makes so much sense. Thanks for the suggestions!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...