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I am constantly surprised by women I meet who can't/don't cook...


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Yes! I took a semester of serious cooking school before I got married, and I'm thankful every day that I did.

 

I want my own daughter to learn cooking and baking, gardening, bookkeeping, cleaning skills, nursing skills, and sewing before she gets married. She'll save herself and her future husband much unhappiness if she comes into marriage prepared.

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It hasn't changed how I live. My dc enjoy cooking with me. Dd is a very good chopper at this point and older ds can cook a few different dinners solo and great scrambled eggs. Luke is a good helper :lol: but he is not a chef just yet.

 

I try very hard to keep from giving them shocked looks. I know that there are PLENTY of people that do not cook, but it's so far from where I am (cooking every meal) that I automatically go into the wide eyed are you for real face. For me, expense is just as big a 'how do you do it?!?' as the idea of being so reliant on others.

 

ETA, Kleine Hexe that goes for men and women where I'm concerned. Although men generally get an involuntary eye roll from me, rather than mouth agape shock.

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Yes, constantly. I couldn't cook a meal, meal plan, budget at all before I was married either. It's taken me years and I'm still working on the whole having company over and cooking order of each dish so nothing has to sit.

 

Teaching my kids to cook with whole ingredients is my goal. And how to preserve foods like homemade spaghetti sauce, veggies, pickles, fruits, jams, etc. is also high on my list.

 

I could bake though. Cookies, Cakes, and pies. But nothing nutritious.

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I think a lot of can'ts are really don'ts, as in they don't want to. It always amuses me when someone says, "I can't boil water" as if they were proud. You can't boil water? Really? Well then you must be really stoopid. :D

 

My daughter has no interest in cooking but she's learning; my son loves it.

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So my question is this, Do you meet a lot of women as well who don't/can't cook? If so, does this make you determined to teach your child/children to cook?

 

 

Meeting all these people has made me very determined to teach all 3 of my dc how to cook and how to be proficient in the kitchen.

 

I will pass on my own skills. But although we RARELY eat out, I can guarantee you that "real" cooks would probably say I can't/don't cook. My spaghetti sauce comes out of a jar and my mac n' cheese comes out of a box. I do make my own pancakes, biscuits, and white sauce. I guess we do whatever we feel tastes better or is necessary for whatever reason. There will always be those who are appalled at what you do. I would love to have enough money to have a live-in cook. But since I'm the live-in cook, well we get by. :001_smile:

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I didn't know how to cook when I got married.

Yes, my incompetency in the kitchen made me determined that my girls would know how to cook before they left my home.

 

I have pulled my oldest into the kitchen with me on occasion, but sometimes, that's more trouble than it's worth.

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I don't think its a requirement of life, marriage, etc. that women, girls need to know/learn how to cook.

 

My mother managed just fine. Isn't that why they invented restaurants?

 

I learned to cook at a young age because I just like it. I still love cooking, baking, etc. My son loves to cook. He loves to help make dinner just because he loves cooking so much.

 

He is super excited to be making our first Thanksgiving at home in over 10 years.

 

My daughter doesn't like to cook. I think she will manage just fine.

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Why are you surprised? Are you just as surprised when you meet men who can't/don't cook?

 

I am surprised by the number of men and women who can't/don't cook. I'm very thankful my dh is an excellent cook. We have a male friend who lived off take out and frozen dinners until he married in his late 20's. :tongue_smilie:

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I can't say that I do. I really don't understand how someone "can't" cook. In my opinion, it seems that if you can read, you can cook. It's just a matter of following a recipe. Now, I can understand people that don't cook because they don't like to, but that is different.

 

Lisa

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I am surprised by the number of men and women who can't/don't cook. I'm very thankful my dh is an excellent cook. We have a male friend who lived off take out and frozen dinners until he married in his late 20's. :tongue_smilie:

 

My dh lived on frozen pizza, drive through food and microwave brownies when he was single. Expensive and unhealthy. I don't want my kids to experience this.:tongue_smilie:

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I'm always surprised by people who don't cook.

 

My sister-in-law raised 4 kids, had a maid, stayed home while the kids were in school, and never cooked a single meal. Even family get togethers were either just reheated food, or catered.

 

She was so happy that her daughter took Home Economics because she learned how to make chocolate chip cookies.

 

This sounds like I'm judging her, but I'm really not. I love her to death. To me it's like finding out there are people who go through life without ever needing to BREATHE.

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I didnt' learn to cook till after I was married. Those first few years were dicey.

 

I dont' think I know anyone who can't cook, though. I think that's just a reflection of my particular posse, though. I'm sure there are plenty of women out there who can't cook.

 

Eventhough I didnt' know how to cook, I'm still suprised to find that other women don't. I rather feel that it was just an inadequacy in my upbringing. My mom certainly knows how to do all things domestic but always shooed me out from under foot to get it done. So, I never learned. I don't know why I would have thought my own mom was the only one to do that.

 

I do think it's sad. I think it creates a dependency.

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As I was telling another friend recently; I come from a long line of "feeders". We feed people. In my family of origin, it's just what you do. My sister and I even joke about how much more relaxed we feel when there are 50 jars of applesauce and Jelly on the shelves in the garage and a a freezer full of meals ready to pop in the oven.

 

We grew up watching our mother and grandmother feed every person who walked through the door and while I hope I don't show it, I am always a little taken aback to find that someone really doesn't cook. I know some people don't like to cook or entertain and I don't see that as a big deal, but those who just use their kitchens to warm up take-out boggle me a bit, just because it is so outside of my experience. However, I think that knowing how to have people over and host a casual dinner is a life skill. Even if you don't like doing it, you should know how to pull it off (even if you let Costco do the cooking!)

 

 

THIS!!!

 

Totally, we are feeders. I am famous for telling people to stop in, something is on the stove-here have a bite, let me get you...

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I don't think its a requirement of life, marriage, etc. that women, girls need to know/learn how to cook.

 

 

 

No, it's not a requirement, but it sure is a great survival skill. You can live cheaper and healthier when you know how to cook. And that's a great thing during those young adult years of college/grad school/early in career-low on payscale years.

 

Yes, some people eat ramen (my dc can't due to celiac). But if you know what to do with dry (or canned) beans and brown rice you can have a meal with a complete protien and fiber and you can have leftovers to reheat. As a result you will be healthier and have the energy to devote to getting through college/grad school and your early career.

 

This goes for men and women, my brother and my dh both cook.

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I didn't learn how to cook growing up (I was raised in the 80s, and I was going to be a big executive with Rosie the Robot preparing my meals and my children in child care from 7 am to 9 pm while I jetted about the globe. :001_huh:) I had to learn on my own.

 

I am amazed at women with families who can't cook at all. I have a close relative like that. Having dinner at their home is torturous. We have cold bratwurst and macaroni and cheese, and her dh cooks it. She has tried making desserts, but they always fail somehow (don't set, aren't cooked right.) I can't imagine trying to feed a family like that.

 

We are planning to teach our ds to cook, too. Dh is a pretty good cook, and he is a huge help when I am sick or busy. We never needed meals brought in, because dh can handle it, and that is nice.

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I think a lot of can'ts are really don'ts, as in they don't want to. It always amuses me when someone says, "I can't boil water" as if they were proud. You can't boil water? Really? Well then you must be really stoopid. :D

 

 

:iagree: I also agree that if you can read then you can figure out how to cook.

 

 

I'm surprised when people are surprised that a woman can't/won't cook and yet don't give it a moments thought if a man can't/won't.

 

Neither I nor my dh learned to cook growing up. Dh learned to cook when he moved out of his parents house at 18. He loves to cook and does it well.

 

It took me longer. Before I met dh I dated a man who cooked often and when he didn't cook his mother did. I asked her a few times to teach me how she cooked and she told me no. She said she liked being the one to feed the family, and she was happy to cook for us. I was busy working and going to school so fine by me. Sigh. I miss her. She would have been a great MIL. :lol:

 

Anyway, all I knew how to do when I married DH was open boxes. He didn't mind because he loves to cook. I've learned how to cook in the mean time. I really dislike cooking. I'd rather clean the toilets. Dh would rather cook than clean. So, dh did most of the cooking. That has changed these last few months because Dh has gone back to school and gets home too late to cook. I'm suffering through it and cooking everyday except weekends.

 

My boys are learning to cook because it is a life skill. It's not hard to learn though. Now, canning and preserving...that's a hard skill. I'm in awe of my late grandmother.

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Not surprised. I can cook but I don't like to.... my mom wasn't a good cook, and neither am I.... I can do the basics fine, and do well with a crock pot. I do like to bake, which everyone appreciates in my house. I'm thankful that dh cooks on the weekends, and occasionally on weeknights. He loves to cook, and finds it to relieve his stress.

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I do like to bake, which everyone appreciates in my house. I'm thankful that dh cooks on the weekends, and occasionally on weeknights. He loves to cook, and finds it to relieve his stress.

 

Same here. I love to bake but hate to cook. DH finds cooking to relieve stress. For me it's the opposite. It makes me stressed.

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I absolutely hate cooking. No one taught me how to do anything. The first week I lived on my own, I had to look in a cookbook for how long to boil an egg. Today, I can follow a simple recipe. I am making sure my children can do simple basic things like cook eggs, rice, spaghetti and follow simple recipes. I just don't see a need for knowing anything else. We don't eat fancy.

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My mother didn't know how to cook when I was growing up. My stepdad cooked (he could sew and fix everything inside and outside the house including tearing apart cars and computers). When he was TDY, we lived on tuna helper, McD's, and pop tarts (he hated tuna, so we ate it while he was gone and tuna helper is pretty idiot proof...ironically, the one thing the woman could make was pumpkin pie, and a killer one at that!). Growing up, a friend taught me how to boil water, hardboil eggs and boil potatoes (I thought her boiling potatoes was the coolest thing), and even how to iron clothes (mom wouldn't teach me, but let me once she found out I knew how). After I married, I started to learn to cook. I was dealing with a health/eating issue and got home before dh, so his cure for that was to have me cook and have supper ready before he came home. Between Betty Crocker, Shake n Bake, and a few phone calls to his mother, I started to gain confidence (though over the years we've each taken turns throwing the other out of the kitchen or going in and doctoring each other's recipes ;) We just do things differently). Then my BIL married another military brat, half Filipino, and we started making her mother's recipes. Then a year in a Mennonite community had me learning everything from chili to roast to cream of everything. In a Greek Church and they are once again challenging my culinary skills...my family LOVES spanikopita and I love making it! Over the years I've collected an assortment of cookbooks and steal recipes from friends and neighbours (and I have two very lovely friends, that are wonderful cooks, whom I call when I have a question). Baking always came naturally to me though. I've been baking bread since I first married and love doing it! My kids have been at my side in the kitchen since they were little. I have absolutely no issue with a child on the counter watching or helping. I was determined that my children will know how to cook as they grow up, not when they grow up. So yes, my knowing a woman that could not cook till after her kids were grown and my having to learn how to cook the hard way did impact my decision with my children. BTW, we're all in love with the FoodNetwork and Chef Ramsay shows.

Edited by mommaduck
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No, it's not a requirement, but it sure is a great survival skill. You can live cheaper and healthier when you know how to cook. And that's a great thing during those young adult years of college/grad school/early in career-low on payscale years.

 

Yes, some people eat ramen (my dc can't due to celiac). But if you know what to do with dry (or canned) beans and brown rice you can have a meal with a complete protien and fiber and you can have leftovers to reheat. As a result you will be healthier and have the energy to devote to getting through college/grad school and your early career.

 

This goes for men and women, my brother and my dh both cook.

 

:iagree: Cooking is an essential life skill, imho. It makes me cringe to see college guys at the grocery store with their cart full of frozen pizzas and frozen dinners. My oldest can cook a few things. He can also sew on buttons and even repaired a seam on one of his shirts. It's just part of living.

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Do you know how many times I have heard dh say this? :willy_nilly:

 

I can read really well~can't say the same about my cooking ;)

 

:iagree:I can read, I can read recipes, they never turn out the way they're supposed to.

 

I absolutely hate cooking. No one taught me how to do anything. The first week I lived on my own, I had to look in a cookbook for how long to boil an egg. Today, I can follow a simple recipe. I am making sure my children can do simple basic things like cook eggs, rice, spaghetti and follow simple recipes. I just don't see a need for knowing anything else. We don't eat fancy.

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree::iagree: I HATE cooking. We do simple. Dh is a better cook than me and the boys cook once a week. When dh is out of town I don't cook. I've tried to analyze why that is over the years. I know cooking is providing for my family, I like to see them happy. I think it's a combination of things, I'll share so you can peer into the minds of those of us that abhor cooking.

 

- it's never done. Those people that I live with always want to eat. I don't like projects that never seem to be finished.

- the time involved. buy food for a meal, prep for a meal, cook it, eat it, clean up, put away the dishes.

- food allergies and intolerances have made cooking complicated. I'm not supposed to have to have this, dh should limit that, ds doesn't like this.

- expense. When you have a strict budget and three different preferences (not for dinner, but lunches and breakfast) it can get pricey.

- sinus issues. I have chronic allergies and I think it has affected my smell and taste buds. I can't tell the subtle differences in food like my dh can. I eat for nourishment, not for the satisfaction of a good meal.

- too many things going on at once. It has helped since ds helps with many meals, but I'm horrible about timing things to be done together, I felt like my brain is fragmented into many pieces trying to operate all at once. I work better when I can focus on one thing at a time, in anything I do.

 

Cooking holds no joy for me. I'd rather do laundry, shovel snow, anything but cook. I'm 43 and that is unlikely to change.

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Hmm. I've never met someone (living independently or married) that could not cook. Granted, some are more passionate about it than others, but I've yet to meet a grown woman that couldn't navigate through a kitchen enough to feed herself or her family. When I was married, I couldn't cook very well...but 12 years later, my family is well-loved and fed:D My husband doesn't cook, but he certainly could. If you can read, you can probably cook well enough.

 

Susan

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My DS refused to learn how to cook when he was a kid. I lovingly, willingly, happily tried to teach him and he just laughed and ran off to do his boy things. Even as a teen he had no interest and it's not something we decided to make mandatory.

 

Both of my adult DD could cook a full meal by age 10. They always WANTED to cook with me and I always invited them to do so. Now, my two adult daughters can make anything as well as I. DD9 is well on her way.

 

My son's fiance can't boil water. I asked her if her mother ever tried to teach her. She says she was just not interested when her mom would offer to teach her how to make something. However, her mom is a lifelong alcoholic and I can see why the child "was not interested" - mom was probably drunk.

 

So now, my DS has taugh himself how to cook. He can make anything. He reads cookbooks and calls me when he has a question, but most of it he has just learned on his own because he wanted to. Future DIL still can't boil water.

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As to the gender bias, for me it is an age thing. I am not necessarily surprised if a man who is 60 or older cannot even toast bread. I am surprised if younger men can't cook. And by that I don't mean gourmet meals but spaghetti where the sauce comes out of a jar. I am surprised if women of all ages can't cook but am most surprised when women over 60 cannot cook.

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I think a lot of can'ts are really don'ts, as in they don't want to. It always amuses me when someone says, "I can't boil water" as if they were proud. You can't boil water? Really? Well then you must be really stoopid. :D

 

 

 

I agree!

 

I think anyone can follow a recipe. When I got married I didn't know how to cook but I never thought I "couldn't" cook. I just had never tried. After I got sick of Hamburger Helper every night I started finding recipes and following them and now I do just fine. I made some mistakes but nothing that would kill anyone. ;) Anyone can put a chicken breast on the stove and make it edible.

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I always liked to cook, but wasn't generally allowed to cook...until my mom started going to night school when I was in hs. I started out reheating casseroles, and ended up teaching myself to cook various things, but I wouldn't have been able to do so if my mom was home.

 

Dh's mom loves to cook, but she never seems to have thought of teaching him. To this date, he still only has one recipe he makes well that is *his* thing to cook. He's handy in the kitchen, but his work schedule is so crazy that we'd all starve to death if we waited for him to come home and feed us. He does the bill paying and most of the laundry, b/c those can be done at all hours.

 

My favorite cooking friend right now is the husband half of a couple we see socially sometimes. He works from home and she's a teacher, so he does most of the cooking. He's an amazing baker, and he tends to post on fb about what's on the stove. I find I'm more motivated to cook when the people around me are also cooking yummy things. They've had a couple of dinner parties, and he's done the lion's share of the cooking each time.

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I couldn't boil water either when I was first married. My mom was wonderful, but she has 5 kids and we were not allowed in the kitchen while she cooked (I guess we stressed her out:confused:). Anyway, your DIL has the capability to learn if she feels led too. My husband fortunately loves everything and is easy to please. His praise helped me a great deal (and still does) when trying new recipes, etc. Plus, my love for cooking has changed over the years. I actually enjoy cooking now, which makes the experience different.

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I agree!

 

I think anyone can follow a recipe. When I got married I didn't know how to cook but I never thought I "couldn't" cook. I just had never tried. After I got sick of Hamburger Helper every night I started finding recipes and following them and now I do just fine. I made some mistakes but nothing that would kill anyone. ;) Anyone can put a chicken breast on the stove and make it edible.

Exactly. The only reason I didn't learn to cook from my stepdad is because he yelled at every thing I did...didn't use the can open right, didn't use the right tool to stir, etc. The one time I was left alone in the kitchen to cook, I set the table for everyone and then he announced that he was taking my mother out to eat and that my brother, the dog, and I could eat what I had made. Yeah, I didn't try again till I left home after that.

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*Warning* Proud person tooting her own horn below! *Warning*

 

My mom taught me how to cook, she made EVERYTHING from scratch and it was YUMMY :) My dad's mom showed HER how to cook b/c they lived across the street and my mom didn't have a mom, or a step-mom yet. They lived in New Orleans and my maw-maw was Cajun, so we know how to make ALL the yummy, Cajun food :) mmmmmmmmm.

 

My mom went back to College when the three of us were all in school, to get her nursing degree. Since I was the oldest, I started out helping her with dinner, but by the time I was 11 I was doing the whole meal and loving it :)

 

I LOVE to cook, find new recipes, watch the Food Network for tips, etc. I constantly get the "will you come to my house and cook?" comments, LOL.

I DO meet a lot of women, sometimes men, who just don't have the desire or TIME to cook. But they probably could if they tried. Everyone is ALWAYS asking DH if "he knows how lucky he is" and "you eat like this EVERY night?!?!?!" He answers YES to both :) (Of course, even I get tired sometimes! and we'll have fish sticks and mashed potatoes! LOL)

 

DS is 6 and is showing interest in helping me cook, sometimes, and I'm starting to teach him :) At some point, I want to teach him through the Julia Child's cookbook :)

Now see, this is how it would have been if I had been raised by my grandmother like my sisters were! Nice southern cooking! You are blessed! Cajun grams...I'm jealous!

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My own younger sister doesn't cook. She proudly proclaims, "I only have a kitchen because it came with the house." Her dh is a very good cook, but he rarely cooks except for family dinners at other people's houses. The reason? They have an indoor cat (my sister's cat from before she & BIL even met), and BIL just cannot bring himself to cook and eat in a house with a shedding cat & a smelly litterbox. So they eat out EVERY meal. They have serious health problems (heart, liver, thyroid, etc.). Both take several prescription medications, and he has had cancer.

 

Contrast that with my family; we mostly eat at home. (I cook, but dh doesn't.) Neither dh nor I take any prescription medications.

 

I taught BOTH of my dc (1 boy & 1 girl) to do basic cooking, as well as basic housekeeping, laundry, and sewing. I'm absolutely ASTOUNDED by how few of their friends are able to do any of those things.

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Alas, I have two college age daughters who could turn into that woman! IME, it's a matter of interest and willingness, not ability.

 

:iagree:

 

I can cook, I just don't like to cook. As we were fixing dinner last night I told my middle son that when he gets rich he can give his mom a great Christmas gift - a personal chef for a year... I absolutely detest cooking and cleaning.

 

That said, since I detest it so much, all of my boys have learned how to help out and can do reasonably well on their own when the time comes. We often all pitch in to make meals here - from the basic frozen pizzas to the full fledged stuffed chicken with all the trimmings and anything in between.

 

Of course, that's because I can't afford a personal cook nor eating out much, plus with eating out too often I'd likely gain way too much weight.

 

But it's definitely true that NOT all women enjoy cooking. I'd despise a gift of anything cooking class related and never watch food shows. I prefer cleaning the barn or something in the great outdoors to cleaning my house (written as both laundry and dishes are being washed). :D

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Honestly, I'd rather be handier with home maintenance/repairs than be an accomplished cook. Yes, I can read and follow a recipe, but I don't think it's the end of the world that I'm one of those who "don't cook." I enjoy baking occasionally but really hate cooking. Anyone can get by somehow when it comes to getting meals on the table, but being able to fix important things around the house on your own is a much more valuable skill in my opinion.

 

ETA: I just realized this sounds like I'm bashing those who are great cooks and who enjoy it. That wasn't my intent. My opinion is more of the mindset of "hurrah! for those who love to cook and are good at it", but that "non-cooks" are not inferior beings. Some people value culinary skills; others have other priorities/gifts/passions.

Edited by kimmie38017
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Yes, I am surprised by the many young ladies I know who do not know how to cook, but were raised with the idea to be "keepers of the home". Many of these young ladies have opted out of college and claim to be "learning to be a wife and mother instead", yet they cannot cook (and these are post-high school gals) and don't seem to be doing anything to learn.

 

I didn't learn to cook until after I married and had all these boys! So I'm guessing that these other young ladies will do the same when they have to. But I also know women my age who are stay at home moms who do not cook nor do they contribute to the financial income of the family - I think they just do whatever they want during the day and their kids and husbands fend for themselves.

 

Cooking still isn't my thing, but I can say that the old adage, "The way to a man's heart is through his stomach." is very true and if a young lady has her eye on a particular fella, she would do well to learn this. My home is a happier home when the fellas are well fed. And, yes, they can all fend for themselves in the kitchen and one ds would like to be a chef.

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As I was telling another friend recently; I come from a long line of "feeders". We feed people. In my family of origin, it's just what you do. My sister and I even joke about how much more relaxed we feel when there are 50 jars of applesauce and Jelly on the shelves in the garage and a a freezer full of meals ready to pop in the oven.

 

.

 

This is how I'd like to be. I am not crazy about cooking because I get tired of planning it. I do enjoy baking and at this moment in time my freezers do have items to share with visitors - pumpkin bread, zuccini (sp!) bread, and butternut squash pies.

 

I would be one of those in my early 20's that couldn't "cook" but I did know how to broil chicken, steam veggies and cook rice. Pretty much just enough to sustain myself. I cook because I like my family to eat healthy, but I'd rather wash dishes ;).

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We grew up watching our mother and grandmother feed every person who walked through the door and while I hope I don't show it, I am always a little taken aback to find that someone really doesn't cook. I know some people don't like to cook or entertain and I don't see that as a big deal, but those who just use their kitchens to warm up take-out boggle me a bit, just because it is so outside of my experience. However, I think that knowing how to have people over and host a casual dinner is a life skill. Even if you don't like doing it, you should know how to pull it off (even if you let Costco do the cooking!)

 

LOL! This is exactly how I grew up! There were always more people at a meal than our immediate family. How my mom managed to stretch the groceries I'll never know. We were quite poor by the day's standard, but I never knew it. The first thing my mom does when someone stops by is offer food or drink. While I learned to cook late (because mom and my oldest sister were so good at it), I did learn that people enjoy visiting over food. My mom modeled "hospitality" and I hope I do the same for my boys.

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I never learned how to cook until I was 22 years old for several reasons:

 

- I wasn't interested

- My mom shooed me out of the kitchen because I was too distracting if I was hanging around

- When my mom did try to teach me, it was her way exactly or the highway.. she just looked very stressed and nobody was having fun

- no interest on my part (mentioning it again because it's a biggie)

 

When I was in college my roommate prepared a few yummy gourmet meals, and I decided that if I wanted to eat well, I could learn how to make my own food. Future dh (boyfriend turned fiance at the time) bought me The Better Homes and Gardens cookbook and I was off. I'm a natural, and I enjoy it - I'm just not speedy :)

 

Now I bake cakes, even. They don't look necessarily pretty, as I'm not a decorator by nature, but they sure do taste good!

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I love to cook, but I don't think it's a character flaw if one can't or doesn't enjoy it. I think people often exaggerate the whole "I can't boil water!" thing.

 

Most everyone can cook something...eggs, pasta, boxed brownines ;) --but say they can't cook. Not many folks eat 21 meals a week in restaurants or even fast food joints. One of my friends in NYC says she *never* cooks, which is not true, since she absolutly has made us pasta, and once, simple echiladas when we visited. She also makes hummas from canned chick peas, and it is excellent. She doesn't enjoy cooking, and she might not be fancy, but she can whip up a few things even while saying "I can't cook!"

 

Some people enjoy being in the kitchen and some do not. That's how it is with a lot of thigs. There are good prepared foods in many market-deli areas now, so I don't think this is such a big deal. You can buy a cooked chicken with a side of butternut squash at my market. Sometimes it looks tempting, let me tell you! :D You can even buy high- quality organic cooked foods all set to go at places like Whole Foods--I love Pad Thai or Brown Rice Stir Fry by the pound. :auto: Sure, some people will eat at McD's everyday, but some people who know how to cook do this as well.

 

When non- cooks-- men and women- need to learn how to cook, they will learn how to cook. Some come to it later than others. Necessity is the mother of invention and all of that.

Edited by LibraryLover
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