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How do you pick read alouds?


persephone43
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Do you choose them yourself or have your dc pick them? Do you have a list of must reads or a shelf loaded with books above their reading level and/or books they would never read on their own? or is it more random?

I initially didn't really want to "schedule" read-alouds, but now I'm afraid if I dont have a game plan, this will quickly fall off of our "we intend to do this" list. We have totally slacked in this area so far. Thanks!

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For our family read alouds, the kids take turns picking them out. I give them a choice of 3 or 4 and they pick from that or else we would be in the basement all day trying to pick a book. These are strictly fun reads. They may be above their reading level, they may not be. I don't put restrictions on family read alouds.

 

For individual read alouds, I use the AO reading lists. Those books are above their reading level and are, on the whole, well-written.

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I have done both scheduled books and let my kids pick them. We've used Sonlight and almost always love their lit. read-alouds. But rather than follow their daily schedule, when I was doing only SL I used the 1-page guide at the front that listed the books in order of use & said which week they started. We read on weekends & holidays too, so I've always had room to add in extra books--these I have either chosen favorites from my childhood or let my kids pick.

 

This year I'm not doing straight SL, I'm going more eclectic, so I made up my own one-page schedule with a list of books I want to "for sure" do and how many weeks they might take if we do 1-2 chapters a day. (I'm a sucker for "one more chapter, please?!" but I don't schedule it that tightly, so we have some wiggle room if we skip a day here & there or if some parts are not as exciting as others etc...). At the bottom of my schedule I listed several optional books that I'd like to get to if time permits, but won't feel at all badly if we can't. (I'll just put them on next year's optional list! Or the kids will read them as readers, or we'll just miss them.)

 

Since we have used SL, that includes a lot of historical fiction, so usually the extra books I add in are more "just for fun" type books. I did pick some other historical fiction books from other places this year though--I looked at Winter's Promise and Illuminations, and a few other things I saw online.

 

For just fun lists, there are all kinds of choices--AO, or the 1000 good books list (there's a link on my website under homeschooling).

 

This year for Christmas we're going to read A Christmas Carol, and Bartholomew's Passage, looking forward to that!

 

We do read-alouds before bedtime, so it's just a part of our nightly routine.

 

Have fun reading! Merry :-)

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I chose the books I read aloud to my dc. They were good books that I wanted to be sure my dc experienced. Some were books I'd read as a child, some were books I wish I had read as a child :-) I read to them one chapter a day, right after lunch, each day that we were home.

 

I figured books they wanted to read they could read to themselves. :-)

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We do one longer read-aloud that I pick, some science read-alouds we both pick from the library but I pick the days, and also ones they pick. Mine are younger so almost everything is read-aloud :lol:

 

Like today we're reading Alice In Wonderland, the giant panda books dd & I picked, dd requested a Magic School Bus this morning, and then they'll pick more later in the evening.

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Do you choose them yourself or have your dc pick them? Do you have a list of must reads or a shelf loaded with books above their reading level and/or books they would never read on their own? or is it more random?
I pick almost all the books, but sometimes I'll give them a choice of two or three. The mix is about 2/3 classic to 1/3 well-written or irresistibly fun contemporary novels that I think will be engaging for both me and the children. The first criteria is interest, the second language. Accordingly, we read a fair bit of literature from the mid-to-late 19th century to get the kids used to the syntax and vocabulary of the time.
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