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I found this this morning here. Note the date. Prescient.

 

December 30, 2009

 

Cathal Kelly

 

While North America's airports groan under the weight of another sea-change in security protocols, one word keeps popping out of the mouths of experts: Israelification.

 

That is, how can we make our airports more like Israel's, which deal with far greater terror threat with far less inconvenience.

 

"It is mindboggling for us Israelis to look at what happens in North America, because we went through this 50 years ago," said Rafi Sela, the president of AR Challenges, a global transportation security consultancy. He's worked with the RCMP, the U.S. Navy Seals and airports around the world.

 

"Israelis, unlike Canadians and Americans, don't take s--- from anybody. When the security agency in Israel (the ISA) started to tighten security and we had to wait in line for — not for hours — but 30 or 40 minutes, all hell broke loose here. We said, 'We're not going to do this. You're going to find a way that will take care of security without touching the efficiency of the airport."

 

That, in a nutshell is "Israelification" - a system that protects life and limb without annoying you to death.

 

Despite facing dozens of potential threats each day, the security set-up at Israel's largest hub, Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion Airport, has not been breached since 2002, when a passenger mistakenly carried a handgun onto a flight. How do they manage that?

 

"The first thing you do is to look at who is coming into your airport," said Sela.

 

The first layer of actual security that greets travellers at Tel Aviv's Ben Gurion International Airport is a roadside check. All drivers are stopped and asked two questions: How are you? Where are you coming from?

 

"Two benign questions. The questions aren't important. The way people act when they answer them is," Sela said.

 

Officers are looking for nervousness or other signs of "distress" — behavioural profiling. Sela rejects the argument that profiling is discriminatory.

 

"The word 'profiling' is a political invention by people who don't want to do security," he said. "To us, it doesn't matter if he's black, white, young or old. It's just his behaviour. So what kind of privacy am I really stepping on when I'm doing this?"

 

Once you've parked your car or gotten off your bus, you pass through the second and third security perimeters.

 

Armed guards outside the terminal are trained to observe passengers as they move toward the doors, again looking for odd behaviour. At Ben Gurion's half-dozen entrances, another layer of security are watching. At this point, some travellers will be randomly taken aside, and their person and their luggage run through a magnometer.

 

"This is to see that you don't have heavy metals on you or something that looks suspicious," said Sela.

 

You are now in the terminal. As you approach your airline check-in desk, a trained interviewer takes your passport and ticket. They ask a series of questions: Who packed your luggage? Has it left your side?

 

"The whole time, they are looking into your eyes — which is very embarrassing. But this is one of the ways they figure out if you are suspicious or not. It takes 20, 25 seconds," said Sela.

 

Lines are staggered. People are not allowed to bunch up into inviting targets for a bomber who has gotten this far.

 

At the check-in desk, your luggage is scanned immediately in a purpose-built area. Sela plays devil's advocate — what if you have escaped the attention of the first four layers of security, and now try to pass a bag with a bomb in it?

 

"I once put this question to Jacques Duchesneau (the former head of the Canadian Air Transport Security Authority): say there is a bag with play-doh in it and two pens stuck in the play-doh. That is 'Bombs 101' to a screener. I asked Ducheneau, 'What would you do?' And he said, 'Evacuate the terminal.' And I said, 'Oh. My. God.'

 

"Take Pearson. Do you know how many people are in the terminal at all times? Many thousands. Let's say I'm (doing an evacuation) without panic — which will never happen. But let's say this is the case. How long will it take? Nobody thought about it. I said, 'Two days.'"

 

A screener at Ben-Gurion has a pair of better options.

 

First, the screening area is surrounded by contoured, blast-proof glass that can contain the detonation of up to 100 kilos of plastic explosive. Only the few dozen people within the screening area need be removed, and only to a point a few metres away.

 

Second, all the screening areas contain 'bomb boxes'. If a screener spots a suspect bag, he/she is trained to pick it up and place it in the box, which is blast proof. A bomb squad arrives shortly and wheels the box away for further investigation.

 

"This is a very small simple example of how we can simply stop a problem that would cripple one of your airports," Sela said.

 

Five security layers down: you now finally arrive at the only one which Ben-Gurion Airport shares with Pearson — the body and hand-luggage check.

 

"But here it is done completely, absolutely 180 degrees differently than it is done in North America," Sela said.

 

"First, it's fast — there's almost no line. That's because they're not looking for liquids, they're not looking at your shoes. They're not looking for everything they look for in North America. They just look at you," said Sela. "Even today with the heightened security in North America, they will check your items to death. But they will never look at you, at how you behave. They will never look into your eyes ... and that's how you figure out the bad guys from the good guys."

 

That's the process — six layers, four hard, two soft. The goal at Ben-Gurion is to move fliers from the parking lot to the airport lounge in a maximum of 25 minutes.

 

This doesn't begin to cover the off-site security net that failed so spectacularly in targeting would-be Flight 253 bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab — intelligence. In Israel, Sela said, a coordinated intelligence gathering operation produces a constantly evolving series of threat analyses and vulnerability studies.

 

"There is absolutely no intelligence and threat analysis done in Canada or the United States," Sela said. "Absolutely none."

 

But even without the intelligence, Sela maintains, Abdulmutallab would not have gotten past Ben Gurion Airport's behavioural profilers.

 

So. Eight years after 9/11, why are we still so reactive, so un-Israelified?

 

Working hard to dampen his outrage, Sela first blames our leaders, and then ourselves.

 

"We have a saying in Hebrew that it's much easier to look for a lost key under the light, than to look for the key where you actually lost it, because it's dark over there. That's exactly how (North American airport security officials) act," Sela said. "You can easily do what we do. You don't have to replace anything. You have to add just a little bit — technology, training. But you have to completely change the way you go about doing airport security. And that is something that the bureaucrats have a problem with. They are very well enclosed in their own concept."

 

And rather than fear, he suggests that outrage would be a far more powerful spur to provoking that change.

 

"Do you know why Israelis are so calm? We have brutal terror attacks on our civilians and still, life in Israel is pretty good. The reason is that people trust their defence forces, their police, their response teams and the security agencies. They know they're doing a good job. You can't say the same thing about Americans and Canadians. They don't trust anybody," Sela said. "But they say, 'So far, so good'. Then if something happens, all hell breaks loose and you've spent eight hours in an airport. Which is ridiculous. Not justifiable

 

"But, what can you do? Americans and Canadians are nice people and they will do anything because they were told to do so and because they don't know any different."

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With all due respect, I think this article leaves out some big components to Israeli security. Ask human rights groups about Israeli profiling and you'll get a much less dignified picture of what is going on over there. Now, I don't oppose profiling in theory. The problem lies in the fact that if you are an Arab in Israel, the government has the ability to detain you indefinitely without formal charges or a trial -- and the record seems to show that rather than picking up a few people here and there who might be suspicious, their government is liable to arrest just about anyone who isn't wearing a yarmulka. For Jews, going through these airports is a cinch. For Arabs, whether they be little children or old women, it's a gamble on whether they'll get out on the other side.

 

This is not a model that is constitutionally sound. Their preoccupation with how fast the system is reminds me of the old saying, "But he always kept the trains running on time!"

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With all due respect, I think this article leaves out some big components to Israeli security. Ask human rights groups about Israeli profiling and you'll get a much less dignified picture of what is going on over there. Now, I don't oppose profiling in theory. The problem lies in the fact that if you are an Arab in Israel, the government has the ability to detain you indefinitely without formal charges or a trial -- and the record seems to show that rather than picking up a few people here and there who might be suspicious, their government is liable to arrest just about anyone who isn't wearing a yarmulka. For Jews, going through these airports is a cinch. For Arabs, whether they be little children or old women, it's a gamble on whether they'll get out on the other side.

 

This is not a model that is constitutionally sound. Their preoccupation with how fast the system is reminds me of the old saying, "But he always kept the trains running on time!"

 

"Do you know why Israelis are so calm? We have brutal terror attacks on our civilians and still, life in Israel is pretty good. The reason is that people trust their defence forces, their police, their response teams and the security agencies. They know they're doing a good job. You can't say the same thing about Americans and Canadians. They don't trust anybody," Sela said. "But they say, 'So far, so good'. Then if something happens, all hell breaks loose and you've spent eight hours in an airport. Which is ridiculous. Not justifiable

 

"But, what can you do? Americans and Canadians are nice people and they will do anything because they were told to do so and because they don't know any different."

 

 

I think the difference is, the Israelis deal with daily or near daily terror attacks from a known enemy, and they have the sense to acknowledge who that enemy is.

 

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the US refuses to acknowledge who its enemy is, holding fast to this ridiculous "it could be anyone" mantra. Yes, it could be anyone. It just so happens it isn't.

 

 

asta

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Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the US refuses to acknowledge who its enemy is, holding fast to this ridiculous "it could be anyone" mantra. Yes, it could be anyone. It just so happens it isn't.

 

 

asta

 

I absolutely agree. It isn't just anyone, it is one particular group over and over again.

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"Do you know why Israelis are so calm? We have brutal terror attacks on our civilians and still, life in Israel is pretty good. The reason is that people trust their defence forces, their police, their response teams and the security agencies. They know they're doing a good job. You can't say the same thing about Americans and Canadians. They don't trust anybody," Sela said. "But they say, 'So far, so good'. Then if something happens, all hell breaks loose and you've spent eight hours in an airport. Which is ridiculous. Not justifiable

 

"But, what can you do? Americans and Canadians are nice people and they will do anything because they were told to do so and because they don't know any different."

 

 

I think the difference is, the Israelis deal with daily or near daily terror attacks from a known enemy, and they have the sense to acknowledge who that enemy is.

 

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the US refuses to acknowledge who its enemy is, holding fast to this ridiculous "it could be anyone" mantra. Yes, it could be anyone. It just so happens it isn't.

 

 

asta

I disagree. We have had American jihadists (sp?) as well.

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With all due respect, I think this article leaves out some big components to Israeli security. Ask human rights groups about Israeli profiling and you'll get a much less dignified picture of what is going on over there. Now, I don't oppose profiling in theory. The problem lies in the fact that if you are an Arab in Israel, the government has the ability to detain you indefinitely without formal charges or a trial -- and the record seems to show that rather than picking up a few people here and there who might be suspicious, their government is liable to arrest just about anyone who isn't wearing a yarmulka. For Jews, going through these airports is a cinch. For Arabs, whether they be little children or old women, it's a gamble on whether they'll get out on the other side.

 

This is not a model that is constitutionally sound. Their preoccupation with how fast the system is reminds me of the old saying, "But he always kept the trains running on time!"

 

I won't address the first issue which you raised; it's far too complex. The current system with TSA is not a very good model, and it's constitutionality is questionable.

 

Regarding your latter statement, I am always reluctant to raise the spectre of Godwin's law.

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With all due respect, I think this article leaves out some big components to Israeli security. Ask human rights groups about Israeli profiling and you'll get a much less dignified picture of what is going on over there. Now, I don't oppose profiling in theory. The problem lies in the fact that if you are an Arab in Israel, the government has the ability to detain you indefinitely without formal charges or a trial -- and the record seems to show that rather than picking up a few people here and there who might be suspicious, their government is liable to arrest just about anyone who isn't wearing a yarmulka. For Jews, going through these airports is a cinch. For Arabs, whether they be little children or old women, it's a gamble on whether they'll get out on the other side.

 

This is not a model that is constitutionally sound. Their preoccupation with how fast the system is reminds me of the old saying, "But he always kept the trains running on time!"

 

And if Mexicans were lobbing rockets into the backyards of people living in San Diego, I would sure hope they'd be profiling at the border!!!

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This is not a model that is constitutionally sound.

 

Neither are the security measures in place now.

 

The US government also detains people w/o charge. They simply call them an "enemy combatant" when they want to suspend the writ of habeas corpus.

Edited by Mejane
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Neither are the security measures in place now.

 

I couldn't agree more. I've spoken about that on the other thread, and I apologize for not making it more clear in my post that I find the measures the TSA is taking here at home despicable as well.

 

EDIT: I just saw your updated last statement, and you are right to bring that up. I didn't mention it because I didn't want to deviate too far from the topic at hand, and to be fair, the number of "detainees" that the US has picked up doesn't begin to compare to the number of people Israel has subjugated in this way. But thank you for the sober reminder that our nation does not hold the torch in setting the example for human rights.

Edited by Skadi
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And if Mexicans were lobbing rockets into the backyards of people living in San Diego, I would sure hope they'd be profiling at the border!!!

 

 

I haven't looked up any facts, but I'm assuming that most people who bomb/attack abortion clinics would self-identify as christians. I can only remember seeing pictures of whites, but that may be because I live in the midwest. If they were doing security at abortion clinics and I showed up at one wearing a prolife T-shirt, I would expect extra scrutiny even though I condemn acts of violence against abortion clinics.

 

(I'm not wanting to discuss abortion here; I was just trying to find a subgroup where I would be the person profiled.)

 

Profiling should encompass much more than race, religion, age, etc., but to ignore those things to be PC is foolishness.

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You might want to withhold the wink for now. Godwin's Law doesn't apply, as my quote was about Mussolini. Not Hitler.

 

You misunderstood me. I thought it was funny that it (Godwin's Law) was mentioned, because someone inevitably does invoke it. That's just how it is around here. (I'm aware that you were referring to Mussolini)

 

 

a

Edited by asta
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I think the difference is, the Israelis deal with daily or near daily terror attacks from a known enemy, and they have the sense to acknowledge who that enemy is.

 

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the US refuses to acknowledge who its enemy is, holding fast to this ridiculous "it could be anyone" mantra. Yes, it could be anyone. It just so happens it isn't.

 

 

asta

 

Amen!

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Interesting article and certainly impressive, but, what about the logistics of implementing Ben Gurion-type security measures in North America?

 

Israel has one major airport, which moves through a much smaller number of passengers than our many commercial airports do here.

 

Obviously, our new TSA procedures are a bust, but, even if we wanted to go the Israeli route, do you believe we would be able to replicate their method with success?

 

I just think that true behavioral profiling----in other words, profiling done without regard to a person's supposed ethnicity/heritage/religion----would require the hiring of a staggering number of qualified, highly-trained experts.

Edited by Imprimis
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Interesting article and certainly impressive, but, what about the logistics of implementing Ben Gurion-type security measures in North America?

 

Israel has one major airport, which moves through a much smaller number of passengers than our many commercial airports do here.

 

Obviously, our new TSA procedures are a bust, but, even if we wanted to go the Israeli route, do you believe we would be able to replicate their method with success?

 

I just think that true behavioral profiling----in other words, profiling done without regard to a person's supposed ethnicity/heritage/religion----would require the hiring of a staggering number of qualified, highly-trained experts.

 

The Israelis offered to train what became our dept of Homeland Security immediately after 9/11 so that they could then train everyone else down to the local level. They were rebuffed.

 

Now look at the clusterfark we have.

 

 

a

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Imprimis,

 

We already hire a staggering number of TSO's, approximately 65,000.00 We don't need as many people under a behavioral profiling system. So, we can reduce the numbers and then train the highly intelligent new recruits in the FBI Quantico system. Also, if would stop deploying our National Guardsmen to foreign countries when they are supposed to be stateside protecting us here, we'd have the security teams that have already been given a lot of training who would only need a little further training at Quantico. We already have the right people and probably pretty close to enough of them, if we'd stop using them like regular army and keep them home where they belong in the first place.

 

Faith

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As I pointed out on another thread, they could easily start with getting a database of actual colostomy,insulin implants, etc, etc. people started so that when these folks are thoroughly screened on their way to Disneyland, they also don't have to be so strenuously screened on their way back home. They don't suddenly become jihadists because they have diabetes or cancer. This would be particularly helpful for any such persons who despite their medical diagnosis are still gainfully employed and having to travel as such.

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I disagree. We have had American jihadists (sp?) as well.

 

Examples?

 

And please don't cite McVeigh. His issue was with the government, specifically the Waco incident. And it was not because of his "Christian" beliefs as he was an agnostic.

Edited by Elaine
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Imprimis,

 

We already hire a staggering number of TSO's, approximately 65,000.00 We don't need as many people under a behavioral profiling system. So, we can reduce the numbers and then train the highly intelligent new recruits in the FBI Quantico system. Also, if would stop deploying our National Guardsmen to foreign countries when they are supposed to be stateside protecting us here, we'd have the security teams that have already been given a lot of training who would only need a little further training at Quantico. We already have the right people and probably pretty close to enough of them, if we'd stop using them like regular army and keep them home where they belong in the first place.

 

Faith

 

 

I agree. Not to mention those scanners are not exactly cheap. Not to mention, our nation needs more employment opportunities.

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As I pointed out on another thread, they could easily start with getting a database of actual colostomy,insulin implants, etc, etc. people started so that when these folks are thoroughly screened on their way to Disneyland, they also don't have to be so strenuously screened on their way back home. They don't suddenly become jihadists because they have diabetes or cancer. This would be particularly helpful for any such persons who despite their medical diagnosis are still gainfully employed and having to travel as such.

 

Speaking of which...

 

Disney takes a partial thumb print from every single person who goes through their gate. It is tied to their ticket. They know exactly who is in their parks at all times. They even have every inch of their parks under video surveillance.

 

If you call Disney to reserve a vacation, they say "Hi Asta! Welcome back - we haven't seen you since 20xx - did you enjoy staying at hotel Y? They have more info on me than my bank. No one is protesting at the gates of Disney about their (horribly efficient) marketing strategies or the fact that they employ a biometric scanning system for security purposes. They just wander around in terror-free bliss at the happiest place on earth. From everything I've ever read, Disney has a SERIOUS anti-terror program.

 

 

a

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Examples?

 

There is that one goofy looking guy who essentially defected and shows up in the English language videos. What's his name? Gahan? No, that's not it...

 

Maybe she's thinking of people with American passports who have decided that jihad is the way to go (pardon the pun)? I know that the FBI has raided some places that were advertising themselves as one thing (stores, religious centers, etc.) but were actually training facilities for terrorist attacks. There are also people with Am. passports who travel to the mid. east for training in AQ camps and then come back and live their lives perfectly normally, "waiting their turn".

 

I'm probably wrong...

 

 

a

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Examples?

 

And please don't cite McVeigh. His issue was with the government, specifically the Waco incident. And it was not because of his "Christian" beliefs as he was an agnostic.

 

http://blogs.forbes.com/abigailesman/2010/11/01/spot-the-terrorist-many-jihadists-in-america-are-white-born-in-the-u-s/?boxes=financechannelforbes

 

This blog post has links to many articles regarding the same and I have read of the same in the past.

 

As for McVeigh, I don't care what his religion is, he was still a terrorist in my book and there is never any justification for killing innocents.

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http://blogs.forbes.com/abigailesman/2010/11/01/spot-the-terrorist-many-jihadists-in-america-are-white-born-in-the-u-s/?boxes=financechannelforbes

 

This blog post has links to many articles regarding the same and I have read of the same in the past.

 

As for McVeigh, I don't care what his religion is, he was still a terrorist.

 

:001_huh: yeah. That is the silliest thing I've ever heard. A terrorist is a terrorist because of what they do, not whatever belief they have.

 

Plenty if people with no religious affiliation murder and do mayhem everyday just because they want to.

 

To say they aren't terrorist just because they don't do it in the name of a god is not only foolish, it's flat out dangerous.

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That is many times the difference between private and publicly funded bureacracies. Private businesses, not underwritten by the government and therefore, not protected by the government from the wrath of the people, have a vested interest in their security. Since it is not under government control, they are held to the accountability of the consumer. Disney is filthy rich and has a lot to loose if their security is ineffective. So it's cheaper to pay for the best intelligence, the best system, but also one that preserves the dignity of your customer so they continue to patronize your establishment, than to pay out the GAZILLIONS of dollars that a jury might award the consumer.

 

One can press criminal charges against an employee of the government recovering monetary damages from the government, not so easy. This insulates them against the backlash that a private company would get for the same problem. One also has a very hard time recovering monetary damages from an individual employed by the government yet it isn't that difficult in the private sector. So one of my GIGANTIC frustrations is that the government, due to a lessening of the people to be vigilent against the abuses of a central government, is now far, far, far less accountable to the people than the business down the road is.

 

We, as a nation, are facing a behemoth government that is accountable to no one unless we choose to make them accountable. That means awakening the "go with the flow" culture from it's disturbing slumber and making each and every government official feel as though they will never have a job in the public sector ever again and such blots on their records that they'd be hard pressed to ever get employed in the private sector, so that they feel they have to be accountable to the people.

 

"If once [the people] become inattentive to the public affairs, you and I, and Congress and Assemblies, Judges and Governors, shall all become wolves. It seems to be the law of our general nature, in spite of individual exceptions." --Thomas Jefferson to Edward Carrington, 1787.

 

Faith

Edited by FaithManor
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http://blogs.forbes.com/abigailesman/2010/11/01/spot-the-terrorist-many-jihadists-in-america-are-white-born-in-the-u-s/?boxes=financechannelforbes

 

This blog post has links to many articles regarding the same and I have read of the same in the past.

 

As for McVeigh, I don't care what his religion is, he was still a terrorist in my book and there is never any justification for killing innocents.

 

I agree. My point was that many link him to radical Islam when it fact he was not linked to it.

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:001_huh: yeah. That is the silliest thing I've ever heard. A terrorist is a terrorist because of what they do, not whatever belief they have.

 

Plenty if people with no religious affiliation murder and do mayhem everyday just because they want to.

 

To say they aren't terrorist just because they don't do it in the name of a god is not only foolish, it's flat out dangerous.

 

Uh, not really. Islamic extremists do what they do because of their belief in Islam and Allah.

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There is that one goofy looking guy who essentially defected and shows up in the English language videos. What's his name? Gahan? No, that's not it...

 

Maybe she's thinking of people with American passports who have decided that jihad is the way to go (pardon the pun)? I know that the FBI has raided some places that were advertising themselves as one thing (stores, religious centers, etc.) but were actually training facilities for terrorist attacks. There are also people with Am. passports who travel to the mid. east for training in AQ camps and then come back and live their lives perfectly normally, "waiting their turn".

 

I'm probably wrong...

 

 

a

 

According to the Forbes article that Priscilla linked, you are correct.

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Uh, not really. Islamic extremists do what they do because of their belief in Islam and Allah.

 

My point is Islamic extremist aren't the only variety of nuts (terrorists) out there.

 

It would be dangerous and foolish to ignore that fact.

 

Good profiling does not ignore the Islamic extremist factor, but it also does not focus exclusive,y on hem to the point of ignoring other dangers.

 

Whether someone goes on a shooting spree for Islam or they are ticked about some other thing - both are terrorists and both can cause equally dead citizens.

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According to the Forbes article that Priscilla linked, you are correct.

 

Yea me.

 

How sad that I even came up with that.

 

How much sadder that people feel so alienated in their own lives that they find solace in ideologies that promise them unlimited rewards for martyrdom.

 

 

a

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Speaking of which...

 

Disney takes a partial thumb print from every single person who goes through their gate. It is tied to their ticket. They know exactly who is in their parks at all times. They even have every inch of their parks under video surveillance.

 

If you call Disney to reserve a vacation, they say "Hi Asta! Welcome back - we haven't seen you since 20xx - did you enjoy staying at hotel Y? They have more info on me than my bank. No one is protesting at the gates of Disney about their (horribly efficient) marketing strategies or the fact that they employ a biometric scanning system for security purposes. They just wander around in terror-free bliss at the happiest place on earth. From everything I've ever read, Disney has a SERIOUS anti-terror program.

 

I've read that Disney and the companies that assist them are advising TSA in certain aspects (crowd control, moving people, turkey drumsticks. Oh. Maybe not the last one.).

Edited by MBM
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:lol: I find the whole Disney thing not inspiring.

 

Unless one of my kids or dh makes this their last dying wish, you literally could not pay me to go to Disney. I view those places as hell on earth and have exactly zero desire to ever set foot in one. I don't even like the Disney stores at the mall. I hate crowds and constant loud noise and lines. Can't imagine paying for that no matter where it is.

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"Do you know why Israelis are so calm? We have brutal terror attacks on our civilians and still, life in Israel is pretty good. The reason is that people trust their defence forces, their police, their response teams and the security agencies. They know they're doing a good job. You can't say the same thing about Americans and Canadians. They don't trust anybody," Sela said. "But they say, 'So far, so good'. Then if something happens, all hell breaks loose and you've spent eight hours in an airport. Which is ridiculous. Not justifiable

 

"But, what can you do? Americans and Canadians are nice people and they will do anything because they were told to do so and because they don't know any different."

 

 

I think the difference is, the Israelis deal with daily or near daily terror attacks from a known enemy, and they have the sense to acknowledge who that enemy is.

 

Despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary, the US refuses to acknowledge who its enemy is, holding fast to this ridiculous "it could be anyone" mantra. Yes, it could be anyone. It just so happens it isn't.

 

 

asta

 

Exactly. Thanks for sharing the original article, asta.

 

Interesting point from the article was that "outrage" may be what changes the dynamic of airport security. Wonder if we're fast approaching that boiling point now?

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Imprimis,

 

We already hire a staggering number of TSO's, approximately 65,000.00 We don't need as many people under a behavioral profiling system. So, we can reduce the numbers and then train the highly intelligent new recruits in the FBI Quantico system. Also, if would stop deploying our National Guardsmen to foreign countries when they are supposed to be stateside protecting us here, we'd have the security teams that have already been given a lot of training who would only need a little further training at Quantico. We already have the right people and probably pretty close to enough of them, if we'd stop using them like regular army and keep them home where they belong in the first place.

 

Faith

 

I do agree it would be helpful if we could scale down the deployment of our National Guard....

 

Yes, there are a myriad of TSA employees now, but, my musings were more along the lines of, "how difficult would it be to put a system in place that would require us to have thousands of highly-trained and truly qualified security personnel in all our airports.

 

I read an interesting comment on another message board that speaks to this issue and questions whether a behavioral profiling model would work in America: The poster said something along the lines of,"This model would require human thought and value judgment. American Government is all about standardization and removal of judgment in favor of policies, procedures and standards."

 

The good thing is we are beginning to question and demand that this issue be tackled.

 

I

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Yes, there are a myriad of TSA employees now, but, my musings were more along the lines of, "how difficult would it be to put a system in place that would require us to have thousands of highly-trained and truly qualified security personnel in all our airports.

 

I

:001_huh: I guess I do see a difference between the ignorant hacks doing it now and the expense of trading them for trained and qualified personnel.

 

I guess I don't buy the argument tho given the millions squandered on unprofessional unqualified untested people and methods.

 

I don't see a second or a greater additional expense.

 

I see a movement of the funds to better use.

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I've read that Disney and the companies that assist them are advising TSA in certain aspects (crowd control, moving people, turkey drumsticks. Oh. Maybe not the last one.).

 

:lol:

 

Thanks for the laugh. I got the funniest picture in my mind of someone's scanned image holding up the leg of a turkey. :D

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