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*History of Technology & Invention

*History of Weapons & Warfare

*The Epic Hero in World Literature

*Science Fiction & Fantasy

We would be interested in these please.

 

Thank you

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Here is a list of resources for History of Science and Technology. I set it up as an Amazon wishlist rather than trying to list all 70 resources in the thread and then link them to Amazon. The Teaching Company (aka Great Courses) has 3 or 4 courses in the History of Science, which I would use as a spine and then fill in with documentaries, "living books," and other resources from the list. For younger students (maybe 7th-9th) you could use the 7-volume OUP Technology in World History series, the Hakim history of science trilogy, and some of the big, well-illustrated history of science books (on the first page of the list).

 

Here is the list for Science Fiction, which includes lots of related topics, like physics, history, political science, as well as literature.

 

Here is a list (30 or so books) on the History of Food

 

As soon as I get more time, I'll try to assemble some of the other lists.

 

Jackie

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Here is a list of resources for History of Science and Technology.

 

Jackie

 

The Victorian Internet is a really fascinating book! I also recently bought A People's History of Science and am really enjoying the completely different perspective (on common people and group dynamics rather than elite "inventors").

 

A couple more ideas:

 

At Home by Bill Bryson has quite a lot of diverse information about innovations and inventions in 19th century architecture, including sheet glass, concrete, and such a well as things like indoor plumbing, mouse traps, the manufacture of china, and other odds and ends.

 

Cathedral, Forge, and Waterwheel by Joseph and Frances Gies is a good reminder of how much innovation occurred during the medieval period, which used to be stereotyped as a time of stagnation.

 

E=mcsquared is the story of atomic physics told in narrative/story form, quite engagingly. The same author, David Bodanis, has another book Electric Universe, about early experimentations with electricity, which I really liked as well. I have not read The Secret House, which bills itself as the science behind a typical day in a regular old house... anyone read it?

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World Religions course:

 

I have the following Teaching Co courses, which will be the basis for the course:

Religions of the Axial Age: An Approach to the World's Religions

Great World Religions: Buddhism

Great World Religions: Hinduism

Great World Religions: Judaism

Great World Religions: Christianity

Great World Religions: Islam

Confucius, Buddha, Jesus, and Muhammad

 

I also have these books:

World Religions: A Voyage of Discovery, Jeffrey Brodd (This is a HS-level textbook published by St Mary's Press, and it includes chapter review questions.)

The Illustrated World's Religions: A Guide to Our Wisdom Traditions, Huston Smith

The DK/Usborne books are beautifully illustrated although the text isn't very deep:

World Religions: The Great Faiths Explored & Explained (DK)

The Usborne Encyclopedia of World Religions

The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Islam

The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Catholicism

The Complete Illustrated Encyclopedia of Buddhism

 

I'll be combining this with a World Geography & Cultures course, so we'll study each religion as we cover the relevant geographic area.

 

Jackie

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Jackie, thank you so muich for putting those lists together. I looked at them yesterday. They are awesome. I am thinking of doing a Food History course with dd when she is in Gr. 8 so I will be culling through your list searching for the books that will work for us.

 

Thank you again for putting all of this time into putting these lists. I am hoping that in seeing your lists, I will be able to use that as a springboard to make up our own 'out of the box' courses.

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Look at nanowrimo - it's a program that encourages you to write a novel in 30 days. However, they have excellent FREE workbooks that teach about the writing process through their young writers program. They are up now - November happens to be NaNoWriMo. You can save them so that you can print them later.

http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/workbooks

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Look at nanowrimo - it's a program that encourages you to write a novel in 30 days. However, they have excellent FREE workbooks that teach about the writing process through their young writers program. They are up now - November happens to be NaNoWriMo. You can save them so that you can print them later.

http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/workbooks

 

Yes, I have these for the kids. We aren't doing nanowrimo, but they've been filling in the workbooks on their own. OYAN seems to be a bit more in depth though...

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Resurrecting this thread because ds is interested in a History of Food and History of Weapons & Warfare class, but I went to Jackie's Amazon lists and they aren't there anymore. Does anyone else have any ideas on some interesting books & resources?

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I love all the course ideas on this thread and have a few questions for those of you who plan unusual courses. What is your general framework for the course other than selecting books to read and videos/lectures to watch? Do you require notes on the reading? Vocabulary? Papers? Projects? I have a course that I want to put together for dd and have the materials, but I haven't moved beyond that stage.

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I would not have thought to try and do Cultural Anthropology on our own, but Jackie set us up beautifully and my dd loves the reading. Jackie, we appreciate that there is lots to think about and question and yet, not a lot of busy work. Dd is happy with the essay topics and questions, but what we do the most of is talk, talk, and talk some more. The ethics part particularly fascinate her.

 

 

Please SHARE!!! My dd has been expressing a deep desire to study Cultural Anth., And it is a course I would LOVE to do also.

 

Our odd courses....

Food Science ( dd is now a dietician), Hydro-engineering, EPA certification course for ds in refrigerants, Lifeguarding/ Water Safety Instructor/ Water Fitness Instructor/ US Swim Coach certification for 2 dc, history of Philosophy, History of Art, Dystopian Literature, Epic Literature ( This year w/ dd...her idea, her choice of Epics),

Nature Sketching, for oldest dd, who is now a graphic designer....this counted as a science elective AND an Art elective. She basically catalogued, drew, labeled the flora and fauna of our area over the course of a year...with lots of research, essays, ecology,etc. This was actually an amazing course, which was unfortunately unschooly, so I do not have a day to day record .....but the book she produced when we were finished is gorgeous. I Wonder if she still has it....hmmmmm.

 

I know we did other odd courses....and those were the ones we enjoyed most and they learned from most. I try not to be afraid of them....but, they always give me butterflies in my tummy.

 

 

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I love all the course ideas on this thread and have a few questions for those of you who plan unusual courses. What is your general framework for the course other than selecting books to read and videos/lectures to watch? Do you require notes on the reading? Vocabulary? Papers? Projects? I have a course that I want to put together for dd and have the materials, but I haven't moved beyond that stage.

I went through this at the beginning of the school year with a course I put together on Middle Eastern Studies - the medieval period. I have a central history survey book for ds to read, matched up with source literary works (some English, some Arabic) and additional lectures/documentaries as available.

 

The core of his written work is a "scrapbook" of sorts. In it he has maps, pictures and notes from his reading. I have made "worksheets" for most of the literature readings (he's an activity sheet kinda kid), and have included essays in most of those. I keep completed sheets in a separate file (I had originally thought to keep them in the scrapbook somehow, I may still do that).

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Here is a list of courses we are considering for the boys for high school. They are available online at www.mit.ocw.edu (MIT opencourseware). We will be making a donation to the cause for each course we use. It will probably be more expensive than typical curriculum because some of the texts are quite costly but we hope to find them used on ebay.

 

Oh, and at the bottom of the list is a course ds (now 8th grade) will be starting in the spring.

 

A Gentle Introduction to Programming using Python

 

Introduction to Copyright Law

 

Kitchen Chemistry and Advanced Kitchen Chemistry as additions to our high school chemistry program

 

Introduction to Geology

 

The Solar System

 

Introduction to Astronomy

 

Introduction to Computer Science and Programming

 

Introductory Analog Electronics Laboratory

 

Physics I: Classical Mechanics with a Mechanical Focus

 

******Lego Robotics – This is SOOOOOOOO on the docket or all three musketeers

 

Art of Color

 

American History to 1865

 

Electricity and Magnetism

 

Practical Electronics

 

Calculus for Beginners and Artists

 

(MIT online Calculus textbook)

 

Also, from Timberdoodle – Practical Drafting

 

 

Faith

 

 

The link has changed over the years. I found MIT Open CourseWare here now. They have a lovely course on Dance Theory and Compositon. I'm adding that to dd's schedule today. She will love it.

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We are doing the Star Trek class next year. It will be called Star Trek and Its Influence. We take 6 week periods and study one aspect of Star Trek. My initial plan has us doing:

 

Philosophy

Technology

Physics

Cultures/Religions

Star Fleet Academy

Film(TV)/actor studies

 

He also wants to study Modern Physics next year, which I think we will attempt, and will be a nice tie in. We're also doing a class on ethics and may add The Ethics of Star Trek to our reading list.

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A place to get ideas: peruse a university's catalog! You can even go online and see what books are required reading from the bookstore.

 

Several less-common classes that my children have done include Master Gardener (through the Extension Office), Lifeguarding, Water Safety Instructor, Wilderness First Aid, Emergency Response, Firefighter I and Firefighter II: Wildland, SQL, Art in Architecture, Textiles, Architectural Drawing and Physics of Flight. The last included ground school--originally we planned to do it at the college, but no one at the NCAA could tell us what it would mean for dd to be full-time at the college. Would it mess up her eligibility for high school sports? So, she did it at the local FBO, eventually earning her private pilot's license. It was probably the class that has had the biggest impact on her further education--she was two months ahead when she went to flight school AND was selected for Aviation because of it. Just last night, she was texting me from Fujairah, UAE, telling me how she was going to get recurrent on her fixed wing when she gets back from deployment.

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We are doing the Star Trek class next year. It will be called Star Trek and Its Influence. We take 6 week periods and study one aspect of Star Trek. My initial plan has us doing:

 

Philosophy

Technology

Physics

Cultures/Religions

Star Fleet Academy

Film(TV)/actor studies

 

He also wants to study Modern Physics next year, which I think we will attempt, and will be a nice tie in. We're also doing a class on ethics and may add The Ethics of Star Trek to our reading list.

 

 

What are you using as text and media for this?

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I have ideas for PE credits. I wrote out the ideas for one in a recent thread on the topic.

 

http://forums.welltrainedmind.com/topic/452767-pe-credits-for-the-non-athletic/

 

Here it is:

One idea I have for a highschool PE credit.

 

Read a book about how city design affects a person's ability to move around without a car. Then using maps and non-car moods of transportation get around the city to different areas of interest. At the end of this course the student will be able to confidently navigate the city/town using human power and not a car. (Note this type of thing can only be done in certain areas, I know that)

 

Biking

So this would include using a map and charting out different bike paths. Then going on bike trips to get to library/pool/museum/stores...

Learn how to bike safely on roads.

Learn about different options for transporting things on bike. (saddle bags...)

Learn how best to lock up your bike, local bike laws, ...

Read some articles about people who have biked a large distance (ie. Across Canada)

Go on various bike trips and chart distance, time, ... Go on a total of X different trips covering at least Y distance.

 

Walking/Bus trips

Learn the bus schedule.

Learn how to take the bus in a smart manner. (Not losing your transfer, having correct change, ...)

Learn about different options for transporting things on bus/walk trips. (Can you take a bike on the bus? If so do that once to make sure you know how to)

Go on various walking/bus trips and chart distance, time, ... Go on a total of X different trips covering at least Y distance.

 

Running

Go to a local Running store

Learn about run groups in your area

Take part in a learn to run group if you can, if not do the couch to 5K by yourself.

 

Other

What about other things you can do in town to get from place to place? Try at least 2 of them. Find a way to take part cheaply. (Ie. does your local thrift store carry skates and helmets? Is there a learn to rollerblade group in your town?)

Skating (If you live in some places you can actually skate to work in winter)

Rollerblading

Skateboarding (Lots of students in our area do skateboard to school on long cruising skateboards)

Cross Country skiing

Horseback riding (We do have 2 mounted police officers in our town. They are neat to spot. It was surprising to see the first time. The officer was in a park, he stopped got off his horse and handed out stickers, then jumped back on his horse and rode away)

 

Get involved

If possible attend a local meeting about transportation. Offer you opinion at a meeting or as a letter to the editor reviewing bike trails / sidewalks / ...

 

ETA: If you are curious I have similar ideas for all 4 years of highschool PE.

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What are you using as text and media for this?

 

My current plan is to use a different book for each section, except the film study which I'm not sure how to approach yet. Here's my amazon wish list.

 

We have Netflix and will hopefully stream episodes as necessary. I haven't yet begun to research specific episodes, but ds has seen them all except the original series.

 

I'm hoping to get some Starfleet Academy stuff for fun. http://shop.startrek.com/accessories/index.php?v=startrek_starfleet-academy_accessories

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My current plan is to use a different book for each section, except the film study which I'm not sure how to approach yet. Here's my amazon wish list.

 

We have Netflix and will hopefully stream episodes as necessary. I haven't yet begun to research specific episodes, but ds has seen them all except the original series.

 

I'm hoping to get some Starfleet Academy stuff for fun. http://shop.startrek...emy_accessories

OMGness! That stuff is great. Thanks for posting it.

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Thanks for the reminder about Courseware, I've spent a good part of the morning looking over some of those classes. I found a videogame theory class that's right up ds alley, as well as some potential courses for later years. Lots of great ways to make English more interesting,

too.

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Thinking of MIT Kitchen Chemistry for the first part of his chemistry year.

 

We'll also be doing a history of weapons that will be mostly for art. He likes to draw the weapons. I'm thinking a journal with one side info on the weapon and the other his drawing.

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Here is a list of resources for History of Science and Technology. I set it up as an Amazon wishlist rather than trying to list all 70 resources in the thread and then link them to Amazon. The Teaching Company (aka Great Courses) has 3 or 4 courses in the History of Science, which I would use as a spine and then fill in with documentaries, "living books," and other resources from the list. For younger students (maybe 7th-9th) you could use the 7-volume OUP Technology in World History series, the Hakim history of science trilogy, and some of the big, well-illustrated history of science books (on the first page of the list).

 

Here is the list for Science Fiction, which includes lots of related topics, like physics, history, political science, as well as literature.

 

Here is a list (30 or so books) on the History of Food

 

As soon as I get more time, I'll try to assemble some of the other lists.

 

Jackie

 

Here's another one to add to your list:

 

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_c_0_13?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=engineers+of+victory&sprefix=engineers+of+%2Caps%2C404

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I'm glad I'm not the only one who spent the day looking over courseware. I found some interesting stuff at Notre Dame OCWand Yale's OCW

 

By far I like the MIT stuff best.

 

 

Did you see that 10 images of hell in the 20th century? course under poli sci on the Notre Dame site? Looks awesome.

 

My wheels are a churning.

 

I bought some intelligo courses we have not used yet, one on palentology and one on art, music and architecture of the renaissance era and I thought those were unusual enough.

 

but thanks to this thread my oldest will be doing the MIT course on videogame studies, and both teens will do this notre dame course next year.

 

Coming up with a good list for the next several years of high school. good stuff.

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