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Those of you who have experience dealing with public schools...


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... could you give me some advice on behalf of a friend? This school year, her son, 9 yo, 4th grade, is in a new school district. And they're having some trouble. She's not sure if she should go along to get along or make a fuss.

 

For reasons that still aren't clear to her, her son was questioned by the school counselor. (She has asked his teacher and the principal why her son got "pulled" as they put it, and no one seems to know.) The counselor asked him how often he takes a shower. Well, this is a 9 year old kid, in kind of a weird situation, being asked a nosy question. And he took the question very literally. He takes a *bath* every day, but he doesn't shower. But he, being nervous, didn't explain the bath part, he just said something like "I don't know, maybe once a week." Well, that was the "wrong" answer. I've been to their house several times, and it is so pretty and clean. Her son is always dressed nicely. I mean, there is just nothing that would make alarm bells go off, that would give them any reason to ask him how often he showers!

 

She also asked him what he had eaten for breakfast that morning, which was a croissant with butter, and then said something like "don't you get any protein?" Well, this was a pretty small sample upon which to form any judgment about his diet. I've seen the way his mom feeds him, and it's perfectly fine. She sends a lunch with him because the cafeteria food is junk. So it almost seems like they were looking for something to be concerned about. If he'd said bacon or eggs, I wonder if she would have asked "aren't you worried about your cholesterol?" :tongue_smilie:

 

Anyway, my friend was informed that her son is now going to have to be monitored by the "health and wellness" program at the school. In January, they want to meet with her and will start some sort of monitoring where he will have to fill out charts about what he eats and when he showers and such!

 

My friend is a very caring and devoted mother, and her son is a normal, happy, average kid. This is NOT some family that they actually need to be worried about, though there are a lot of poor and disadvantaged children at this school. She is wondering if they are making trouble for her in this petty way, because they view her as a "trouble maker". She once heard a teacher make a disparaging remark about a child who has a congenital condition, and she mentioned it to the principal. On another occasion she heard a teacher screaming at a child as she was walking down the hall, and she stuck her head in the door to ask if she could help, to try to defuse the situation. And recently, her son's teacher sent home some graded tests for her to view and sign, and she pointed out that the teacher had made a mistake in tabulating his grade.

 

So, she's just wondering what she should do. On the one hand, she has nothing to hide and can prove that they have a perfectly normal and healthy life by going along with this. But on the other hand, she feels she shouldn't have to, and also fears that if she protests, they'll just make *more* trouble for her.

 

WWYD?

Edited by GretaLynne
stupid spelling mistakes
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I would request a meeting with the principal and the 'health and wellness' program person (who ever the heck that is!) and ask for more information.

 

I would use phrases like "I am confused' a lot. "I am confused why my son is being questioned about his personal hygene" "I am confused about why my son is being monitored"

 

Ask lots of questions and try to get as much information as possible. It could be a misunderstanding. I hope it is.

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The first thing I'd do if it were me would be to start schooling dc to say very politely, "I'm sorry, but that is none of your business." The second thing I'd do would be to contact an attorney. Because although I have nothing to hide and my dc is healthy and happy you know as soon a anything is said or protested the school will contact CPS. The third thing would be to start a paper trail. They are building a file against her, she needs her own with names, dates, the whole shebang. Last I'd start looking to private schools. Again knowing that as soon as the paperwork is complete the public school will call CPS.

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The first thing I'd do if it were me would be to start schooling dc to say very politely, "I'm sorry, but that is none of your business." The second thing I'd do would be to contact an attorney. Because although I have nothing to hide and my dc is healthy and happy you know as soon a anything is said or protested the school will contact CPS. The third thing would be to start a paper trail. They are building a file against her, she needs her own with names, dates, the whole shebang. Last I'd start looking to private schools. Again knowing that as soon as the paperwork is complete the public school will call CPS.

 

Oh, gosh, is it really that serious? Now I'm scared for her. Thanks, though, for the brutal honesty!

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I would request a meeting with the principal and the 'health and wellness' program person (who ever the heck that is!) and ask for more information.

 

I would use phrases like "I am confused' a lot. "I am confused why my son is being questioned about his personal hygene" "I am confused about why my son is being monitored"

 

Ask lots of questions and try to get as much information as possible. It could be a misunderstanding. I hope it is.

 

:iagree: It can't hurt to ask about all this. And it will show that she is an involved parent who takes an interest in what goes on at school. I don't think she needs to be paranoid, but she should definitely get to the bottom of their concerns.

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Oh, gosh, is it really that serious? Now I'm scared for her. Thanks, though, for the brutal honesty!

It is if they think she has something on them.

 

I'm pretty cynical when it comes to things like government entities. She is an "outsider" an unknown. How many times has she caught them behaving badly? Now all of a sudden they have "ammunition" to use to discredit her if she says anything about them behaving badly. What if she tells that child's mother she saw the teacher yelling at him/her? What if she tells the other child's mother about the comment. She has to be discredited. How else to do that then to make her seem like a bad/unfit parent.

 

I'm wondering if it would be beneficial for her to step up first and go to the school board and maybe even the media. It would be an "oh, poor me" story, but it would get public support in her favor. I don't know. That is just me thinking out loud while wearing my shiny silver hat. Just hold that thought in case things escalate.

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The first thing I'd do if it were me would be to start schooling dc to say very politely, "I'm sorry, but that is none of your business." The second thing I'd do would be to contact an attorney. Because although I have nothing to hide and my dc is healthy and happy you know as soon a anything is said or protested the school will contact CPS. The third thing would be to start a paper trail. They are building a file against her, she needs her own with names, dates, the whole shebang. Last I'd start looking to private schools. Again knowing that as soon as the paperwork is complete the public school will call CPS.

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

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I would request a meeting with the principal and the 'health and wellness' program person (who ever the heck that is!) and ask for more information.

 

I would use phrases like "I am confused' a lot. "I am confused why my son is being questioned about his personal hygene" "I am confused about why my son is being monitored"

 

Ask lots of questions and try to get as much information as possible. It could be a misunderstanding. I hope it is.

 

This is what I would do. Iron fist, but in a velvet glove.

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If it were me, I would email the teacher to ask what it's all about. I would explain exactly what the son said about the shower/bath question. Depending on the school's reasoning, I'd either go with it and use it to teach my child about hygiene and proper nutrition or I'd just ignore it and let the teacher know that it's not necessary and you won't be doing it.

 

If the family is as you says it is, there is nothing to worry about if they call cps so I really wouldn't worry about it.

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The last year my ds's were in public, I found out that my oldest had been pulled into the counselors office. I am not sure everything that he was asked, but he was questioned about my marriage, whether ds was concerned about divorce, did he have anything at home troubling him?

 

There was no reason for him to be pulled and asked about these things, and upon questioning, I found this to be common practice for the school counselors. It's a screening that they feel more than justified doing.

 

We pulled them out of school that spring for this and a multitude of other reasons. Two years of parochial school later, we are now happy at home.

 

I agree with Parrotheads advice. Even though I had nothing to hide, I was very uneasy knowing they were questioning my children without my consent/presence/knowledge.

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This is what I would do. Iron fist, but in a velvet glove.

 

Yes, this. I wouldn't go all mama bear on them. Just polite and curious and non-threatening, but sharp/savvy, KWIM? It could have been a perfectly understandable misunderstanding, and if she goes in guns drawn, she'll look foolish and they'll get their backs up, and she'll make things worse.

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If it were me, I would email the teacher to ask what it's all about. I would explain exactly what the son said about the shower/bath question. Depending on the school's reasoning, I'd either go with it and use it to teach my child about hygiene and proper nutrition or I'd just ignore it and let the teacher know that it's not necessary and you won't be doing it.

 

If the family is as you says it is, there is nothing to worry about if they call cps so I really wouldn't worry about it.

 

CPS is a nightmare. They won't just go away. Just having an investigation opened up causes a paper trail. Yes, they have to declare it unfounded if it is unfounded, but the family's good name is smirched. Forever. It is public record. Employers, creditors, private investigators, law enforcement can hold just the fact that a case was opened against the parent(s).

 

If you doubt it read Swellmomma's posts about her nightmare with CPS.

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The first thing I'd do if it were me would be to start schooling dc to say very politely, "I'm sorry, but that is none of your business." The second thing I'd do would be to contact an attorney. Because although I have nothing to hide and my dc is healthy and happy you know as soon a anything is said or protested the school will contact CPS. The third thing would be to start a paper trail. They are building a file against her, she needs her own with names, dates, the whole shebang. Last I'd start looking to private schools. Again knowing that as soon as the paperwork is complete the public school will call CPS.

 

I agree, and I have had this unpleasant experience. While CPS was very nice and closed the case rapidly, my mother is a lawyer and the situation occurred in a the county she had been practicing law in for more than 30 years; so, their first contact was with her and phone consultations conducted with a few former judges and other members of the bar specializing in family law before we agreed to let them into the house and to talk with the children in our presence in order to expedite closing the case. I would never wish an encounter with CPS on anyone, and would advise taking that kind of strange, hostile behavior on the part of a school very seriously.

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First I would ask the questions, like posted. And in the meantime -

 

The first thing I'd do if it were me would be to start schooling dc to say very politely, "I'm sorry, but that is none of your business." The second thing I'd do would be to contact an attorney. Because although I have nothing to hide and my dc is healthy and happy you know as soon a anything is said or protested the school will contact CPS. The third thing would be to start a paper trail. They are building a file against her, she needs her own with names, dates, the whole shebang. Last I'd start looking to private schools. Again knowing that as soon as the paperwork is complete the public school will call CPS.

 

I would do this. Because if you DO find anything out when you start asking, and it is bad and you protest, it's all downhill and you want to be able to pick up that phone.

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CPS is a nightmare. They won't just go away. Just having an investigation opened up causes a paper trail. Yes, they have to declare it unfounded if it is unfounded, but the family's good name is smirched. Forever. It is public record. Employers, creditors, private investigators, law enforcement can hold just the fact that a case was opened against the parent(s).

 

If you doubt it read Swellmomma's posts about her nightmare with CPS.

 

This was not the case for us. The letter closing our case as unfounded included the reference to the relevant law stating that no records would be kept of the contact at all. However, that may be specific to the state in which the investigation occurs.

 

ETA: i would agree however that CPS is a nightmare...even when they are nice to you.

Edited by Elizabeth in WA
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This was not the case for us. The letter closing our case as unfounded included the reference to the relevant law stating that no records would be kept of the contact at all. However, that may be specific to the state in which the investigation occurs.

That is curious. I suppose your state agency does not keep count of how many calls have been made about any particular family.

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That is curious. I suppose your state agency does not keep count of how many calls have been made about any particular family.

 

I think they could keep a record of uninvestigated calls, but they had to investigate all calls made by mandatory reporters. And once an investigation was ruled unfounded, then related records had to be destroyed. We let them in because they could only rule an investigation as unfounded if they could actually investigate. If we didn't let them in and they didn't get a warrant, they might close the case, but not in the same way and then records could be kept. This was not the state I live in now, and as I said, I was lucky to have lots of excellent free legal advice available at the time. It was still really, really unpleasant.

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I addition to anything she may do with the school staff, I would suggest that she immediately schedule an appointment with her pediatrician or family practitioner. She can explain that she is looking for a well child visit and that she is looking to proactively document that her son is in normal ranges and is healthy.

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I agree about the well child visit and ask the dr. for some proof in writing. You can print free health forms and the dr. probably has them for the schools for sports and such.

I also agree that they have targeted them. I would schedule the dr.'s appt., get the paperwork, and then set up a meeting with the principal, counselor, and health person. Then I would be blunt and had them the paperwork from the dr. I would make it clear that in my eyes the matter was closed.

I would also find another school.

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CPS is a nightmare. They won't just go away. Just having an investigation opened up causes a paper trail. Yes, they have to declare it unfounded if it is unfounded, but the family's good name is smirched. Forever. It is public record. Employers, creditors, private investigators, law enforcement can hold just the fact that a case was opened against the parent(s).

 

If you doubt it read Swellmomma's posts about her nightmare with CPS.

 

I'm sure it's different in various areas, but I worked as a child welfare caseworker for 10 years (msw). It takes a LOT more than not taking a shower and no protein for breakfast for cps to become involved with a family beyond investigating the initial report. Also, in the state I worked in everything was completely confidential. We were not allowed to share any sort of information with anyone whatsoever unless those who were under investigation signed a release form and it certainly was not public record. Now if things go to court, that's a different story. It was my experience that if the case was in court, something serious was happening....a lot more than a lack of showers or protein for breakfast.

 

I have read Swellmomma's posts in the past and her descriptions sounded like nothing I have ever seen or heard from any professional child welfare worker (sexual abuse for extended breast feeding, pushing ps so the children learn to obey). The only thing that I could conclude was that things must be very different in Canada than they are where I'm from.

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I agree with other posters. I definitely would not just go along with this. Those kinds of questions are very specific and rather odd.

 

The first thing I'd do is call the school principal and insist on a meeting with the teacher, principal and the counselor together. Bring an advocate or friend. "I'm confused, can you please explain to me why...." is a great phrase to use. "Do you have specific concerns about my child?" is another important question.

 

Ask to see the child's school records--a formal request, in writing, to the school and the district office, whatever the records request procedure might be. Any written documentation the counselor makes is a part of a child's school record and parents should have access. (Depending on state law.) Kill them with kindness and confusion, but she needs to let them know she's not going to be rolled over either.

 

Say "Thanks for considering us, but no thank you," to the "health and wellness program." Actually, I'd be asking all kinds of questions about this one....Is this program district-wide? What is the purpose of the program? How are children selected for participation in this program? Why her child in particular? Our district has to send out a letter notifying all families if they even intend to distribute a paper wellness questionnaire to high school students, and families and/or students can opt out. I can't imagine them pulling a child aside for a questionnaire about hygiene and diet then enrolling the child in a health program without parental consent.

 

The whole things sets off alarm bells for me, and I am not easily alarmed, which is why I would also....

 

If things are not immediately resolved with an excellent explanation, if I were in her shoes I would be moving up the chain of command. At the school district office asap asking to talk to the superintendent, and I'd probably be contacting the school board too. (I actually had to do something similar when my dd was in kindergarten. The school wouldn't resolve a troublesome situation. I met with the director of special ed. I found out later that there was quite a fall-out but things were quickly changed for the better. Not saying I'm all that, just that it can be an effective strategy.)

 

Schedule a well-child visit with the pediatrician. Ask him or her to specifically document that the child is healthy, clean, well-nourished and cared for.

 

Find an attorney who deals with education or child law, even if it's just a short visit to find out what the family's and child's legal rights are and if this is a common occurrence in this school system.

 

:grouphug:

 

I hope it is all a misunderstanding. But it sounds...odd. Good luck to your friend and her family as they navigate this.

 

Cat

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I would be scared, particularly as a parent who's own 12yods has less-than-stellar hygiene and eating habits :tongue_smilie:, even though I know he's just fine.

 

Like others, I'd question, but hold back the mama bear until I got some basic answers. What prompted this screening? How was it determined that he needed monitoring? What is the purpose of the monitoring, what are they looking for, and what do they intend to do with their observations?

 

My skin is crawling, just thinking about it.

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I agree with other posters. I definitely would not just go along with this. Those kinds of questions are very specific and rather odd.

 

The first thing I'd do is call the school principal and insist on a meeting with the teacher, principal and the counselor together. Bring an advocate or friend. "I'm confused, can you please explain to me why...." is a great phrase to use. "Do you have specific concerns about my child?" is another important question.

 

Ask to see the child's school records--a formal request, in writing, to the school and the district office, whatever the records request procedure might be. Any written documentation the counselor makes is a part of a child's school record and parents should have access. (Depending on state law.) Kill them with kindness and confusion, but she needs to let them know she's not going to be rolled over either.

 

Say "Thanks for considering us, but no thank you," to the "health and wellness program." Actually, I'd be asking all kinds of questions about this one....Is this program district-wide? What is the purpose of the program? How are children selected for participation in this program? Why her child in particular? Our district has to send out a letter notifying all families if they even intend to distribute a paper wellness questionnaire to high school students, and families and/or students can opt out. I can't imagine them pulling a child aside for a questionnaire about hygiene and diet then enrolling the child in a health program without parental consent.

 

The whole things sets off alarm bells for me, and I am not easily alarmed, which is why I would also....

 

If things are not immediately resolved with an excellent explanation, if I were in her shoes I would be moving up the chain of command. At the school district office asap asking to talk to the superintendent, and I'd probably be contacting the school board too. (I actually had to do something similar when my dd was in kindergarten. The school wouldn't resolve a troublesome situation. I met with the director of special ed. I found out later that there was quite a fall-out but things were quickly changed for the better. Not saying I'm all that, just that it can be an effective strategy.)

 

Schedule a well-child visit with the pediatrician. Ask him or her to specifically document that the child is healthy, clean, well-nourished and cared for.

 

Find an attorney who deals with education or child law, even if it's just a short visit to find out what the family's and child's legal rights are and if this is a common occurrence in this school system.

 

:grouphug:

 

I hope it is all a misunderstanding. But it sounds...odd. Good luck to your friend and her family as they navigate this.

 

Cat

 

:iagree: Take it from a former troublemaker (I asked questions like "Are they ever going to have spelling?" and "Shouldn't they be learning how to add and subtract instead of spending 7 weeks learning how to make tally marks?") She needs to be proactive. I wish I had done more last year on my son's behalf. He was sent to talk to the guidance counselor at least once a week, and he would tell me all kinds of weird things they discussed. Now, my son does have issues, but they just made it very difficult for him and for us as parents. They are still causing me grief, even though the kids aren't in the school. I lead a Cub Scout den, and requested to use the school for our meetings, since most of the kids in my den go to school there. Yesterday, I received an email from the principal that we had left the kitchen in disarray after our meeting. I don't even know where the kitchen is! They just don't like me.

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Former school teacher here . . . I'm sorry to disagree with the other commenters, but under NO circumstances would I teach the child to say "That's none of your business." Nothing will send up red flags for this school faster than a child sounding 'programmed' to hide family information.

 

Which is not to say that I agree with what the school is doing--I don't--but that response will make this situation much, much worse because it sounds as if the family is teaching the child to hide the condition of the family.

 

I would definitely meet with principal, health and wellness people, et al., and explain showering, typical breakfast, and my suspicion that my family was being targeted because I had spoken out. I would make clear to them that I had written lists of incidents (disturbing things she had seen as well as times her child was questioned) and was keeping a record.

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I agree with all the rest, and do think it is very odd.

I would ask for any pertinent information regarding this in writing from the school. Request it in writing - at all levels. Everything she does needs to be in writing and well documented. She needs to take notes at meetings, show the notes to whom ever is present, and have them agree that they are accurate (have them sign the paper if they will).

Ask for a meeting with the counselor and the principal. You don't have to go in defensive - but it is more than reasonable for you to want an explaination. Why was he pulled? Why does one breakfast represent his diet? Does he not look or smell clean???

PS's have gotten much more "in your business" in the last 10 years. They truly believe, and have been backed up by the supreme court, that our parenting ends when we drop them off at the door.

I don't want to get political, but this is part of a progressive mind-set that they can raise our children better than we can.

Tell her to be wary and watch how she words anything, but to go after this as inappropriate.

 

ETA: She may not need to take this personally at all, though. He's new, and they will assume she won't make a fuss trying to fit in. They probably have a quota for a certain number of students that have to be enrolled. They will say - "oh - look, he didn't eat well or shower and after we did our wonderful program he is all better. Give us more money to do more of these....."

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I would advise your friend to write down everything they say and bring it in at some point to discuss. It sounds like they are attempting to make a case against them. And, yes, they might be doing this over something as innocuous as your friend ruffling someone's feathers. It happens.

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Thank you all so much for taking the time to reply and help my friend. I really am scared for her now! But I also feel better, because you've given a lot of great suggestions for how she can be proactive and protect herself and her son. Thank you so very much. I am going to pass this along to her.

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I agree with other posters. I definitely would not just go along with this. Those kinds of questions are very specific and rather odd.

 

The first thing I'd do is call the school principal and insist on a meeting with the teacher, principal and the counselor together. Bring an advocate or friend. "I'm confused, can you please explain to me why...." is a great phrase to use. "Do you have specific concerns about my child?" is another important question.

 

Ask to see the child's school records--a formal request, in writing, to the school and the district office, whatever the records request procedure might be. Any written documentation the counselor makes is a part of a child's school record and parents should have access. (Depending on state law.) Kill them with kindness and confusion, but she needs to let them know she's not going to be rolled over either.

 

Say "Thanks for considering us, but no thank you," to the "health and wellness program." Actually, I'd be asking all kinds of questions about this one....Is this program district-wide? What is the purpose of the program? How are children selected for participation in this program? Why her child in particular? Our district has to send out a letter notifying all families if they even intend to distribute a paper wellness questionnaire to high school students, and families and/or students can opt out. I can't imagine them pulling a child aside for a questionnaire about hygiene and diet then enrolling the child in a health program without parental consent.

 

The whole things sets off alarm bells for me, and I am not easily alarmed, which is why I would also....

 

If things are not immediately resolved with an excellent explanation, if I were in her shoes I would be moving up the chain of command. At the school district office asap asking to talk to the superintendent, and I'd probably be contacting the school board too. (I actually had to do something similar when my dd was in kindergarten. The school wouldn't resolve a troublesome situation. I met with the director of special ed. I found out later that there was quite a fall-out but things were quickly changed for the better. Not saying I'm all that, just that it can be an effective strategy.)

 

Schedule a well-child visit with the pediatrician. Ask him or her to specifically document that the child is healthy, clean, well-nourished and cared for.

 

Find an attorney who deals with education or child law, even if it's just a short visit to find out what the family's and child's legal rights are and if this is a common occurrence in this school system.

 

:grouphug:

 

I hope it is all a misunderstanding. But it sounds...odd. Good luck to your friend and her family as they navigate this.

 

Cat

:iagree:I agree with this. I think it is exactly the right way to handle the situation.

 

I especially agree with this

The whole things sets off alarm bells for me, and I am not easily alarmed

 

Good Luck to your friend. I hope you will keep us updated.

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My child was asked questions that I thought were really inappropriate. I coached her to say that I told her that she wasn't supposed to answer those questions until she called me first. She was to be polite, but insist on calling me.

 

It didn't happen again, so she was never put in that position. We had been thinking about homeschooling for months, but the nosy guidance counselor was the last straw, and we pulled the kids out within weeks.

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Are there behavioral or attention issues?

Maybe they are looking for a reason to explain something else?

Also, I wouldn't jump to conclusions until I had a meeting with the counselor. I mean, maybe your friends kid is doing something at school he shouldn't. We just don't have enough information.

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Oh Greta, I'm sorry for your friend. Once again parental rights are trying to be questioned and usurped.

 

Again (and this ties maybe a little with my thread of this past spring/summer) professional adults in whatever forum: medical, education, etc should have an opinion based on history with that child and not "trying" to look for problems.

 

Whether this boy is new to that district or not, school started 2 1/2 months ago, approximately, and that's enough time for a "pattern to be repeated" AND noticed by teacher/s and or peer/s.

 

It seems a meeting with the teacher is in order. If that does not produce desired results, then a meeting with admin.

 

There are many children who do suffer from neglect, but an "objective" teacher/professional "should" be able to assess the situation. This teacher is either inexperienced or trying to prove a point. My concern is for the child and parent.....this child will now be watched with a magnifying glass. Are they going to more easily construct an issue/problem where one does not exist?

 

If they know of an attorney from family or friends, I'd certainly be on the phone to them to know where their RIGHTS stand.

 

FYI...my dd has always been homeschooled. However, my dad and uncle were top administrators years ago in the ps system and I was substitute teacher for years....seeing alot of situations.

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Are there behavioral or attention issues?

Maybe they are looking for a reason to explain something else?

Also, I wouldn't jump to conclusions until I had a meeting with the counselor. I mean, maybe your friends kid is doing something at school he shouldn't. We just don't have enough information.

 

These were my first thoughts as well.

 

BUT...What I find alarming is that the parent has already approached teacher and principal and has been told that they do not know why the child was pulled for these questions.

 

If there are behavior and attention issues, or any issue that needed explanation, the family should have already been approached, and if they hadn't been yet that conversation would have been the time to bring them up.

 

It could be that it's a district-wide program, and the counselor selects children either randomly or based on some unknown (to the family) criteria. In that case, all the mom needs to do is say "No thanks." (Actually, in that case, the principal and teacher should have already known and been able to say, "It's just random selection," or whatever.) But if they are questioning this particular child, and the teacher and principal aren't able to say why, there's a need to explore more.

 

Sorry, Greta. I am not trying to be alarmist. My hope is that it's just a voluntary health program for tracking the numbers of kids in the school who could benefit, and it's just been explained poorly to your friend. But just in case, it's worth pursuing.

 

Cat

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Good Luck to your friend. I hope you will keep us updated.

 

Thanks, yes, I have a happy update to report this morning! Up until now, my friend's contact with the school had been through her son's teacher and the principal. Well, I guess the principal doesn't like her very much because of her complaining about inappropriate behavior from one of the other teacher's, and this teacher brought the issue to him when she had mis-graded the boy's paper and my friend pointed it out. Anyway, he was very vague and evasive with her when she asked why her son had been sent to the counselor, so that kind of freaked her out. She had asked his teacher too, but she didn't seem to know. And the counselor had left a rather cryptic message on her phone, so she didn't know what to think.

 

Well, this morning, she got to talk to the counselor herself, and was much relieved. The counselor said this is just part of a routine screening that they do for all new students, and that she knows that friend's son is very clean and perfectly well cared for. It's part of her job to offer the health and wellness program, but it is not required. Friend said she did not want to participate, and counselor said that's fine, we're done.

 

So it seems that maybe the counselor is the most rational and professional person at this school! I almost think the principal was playing games with her. She had complained about a teacher and worried him, so now he was going to use this opportunity to worry her and show her who's boss. Ridiculous. But she said the counselor seemed entirely reasonable and almost apologetic. So hopefully this will all blow over!

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