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speech help...


dakarimom5
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My 4yo was turned down for speech therapy because they say she is smart and has a large vocabulary. Also she is hs. All this is true but she still can't speak so that you can understand her. There are times when I can't even understand her. They also said she is easily coachable, she is with them but I have no idea what to do or how to do it. Is there something I could use to help with her speech? Right now we are using 100EZ lessons but not doing a lot of the say it fast/slow parts because she can't say things correctly. Thanks.

Edited by dakarimom5
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Keep teaching phonics. As she learns the correct pronunciation of phonograms , her speech will improve.

 

Read a lot ,talk a lot , ask questions.

 

For us First language lessons is working wonderfully . You could use it starting in K or 1st . Also Straight Talk and other speech materials have helped my son a lot.

 

He is now 6 and we are moving to other materials( grammar) . I am hoping Rod &Staff will help him tremendously . I will use this after we finish FLL. He talks much better now after learning how to read ( he reads at 2-3rd grade level) but he still needs help with correct grammar.

 

I have for sale some speech materials I have used with him if interested :

 

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/forums/showthread.php?t=222804

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My 4yo was turned down for speech therapy because they say she is smart and has a large vocabulary. Also she is hs. All this is true but she still can't speak so that you can understand her. There are times when I can't even understand her. They also said she is easily coachable, she is with them but I have no idea what to do or how to do it. Is there something I could use to help with her speech? Right now we are using 100EZ lessons but not doing a lot of the say it fast/slow parts because she can't say things correctly. Thanks.

 

I use Super Star Speech with one of my sons. I think you can buy it at Amazon, but I bought mine at CurrClick.

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What does she need to work on? Is it her pronunciation or her understanding/use of language, or both? I am an SLP and I worked with PreK through high school before I started homeschooling my ds. I'm sorry to hear she didn't qualify for services. I have heard parents have had success using Super Star Speech , though I haven't used it myself. I've seen it's also available in print form through amazon. If you can provide more details about where she needs help, I may be able to point you toward some more specific resources.

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I use Super Star Speech with one of my sons. I think you can buy it at Amazon, but I bought mine at CurrClick.

 

I just bought this for my 3yo. The e-book is 12.95 (I think) at currclick. I can't review it as far as how it works but it is laid out nicely and I've heard good things from other users. It helps you make an individualized speech therapy plan depending on which sounds your dc struggles with it. We have only used it for a week and my son does much better with the 'n' sound. It doesn't carry over into day to day speech yet but the programs says that will happen with practice.

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Thanks for the post, my almost 5 year old has significant areas of problem in his speech - even dh and I can't understand him much of the time. I've been trying to figure out how to afford speech therapy and this thread was timely. I've just bought the Super Star Speech download and will start working with him right away!

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My 4yo was turned down for speech therapy because they say she is smart and has a large vocabulary. Also she is hs. All this is true but she still can't speak so that you can understand her. There are times when I can't even understand her. They also said she is easily coachable, she is with them but I have no idea what to do or how to do it. Is there something I could use to help with her speech? Right now we are using 100EZ lessons but not doing a lot of the say it fast/slow parts because she can't say things correctly. Thanks.

My son was turned down for speech therapy too--twice. He could form all the letter sounds, (and more!) We eventually did the LiPS program at home. http://www.ganderpublishing.com/LiPS/ My son's speech problems seemed to stem from the fact that he confused similar sounds, so he put the wrong sounds in several words. LiPS taught him to distinguish different sounds. Also, at age 4, what they consider "normal" for that age might still be difficult to understand. Here's another website that I also find helpful. http://mommyspeechtherapy.com/?page_id=55

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Do you live in a state that does not permit speech therapy for homeschooled kids in public schools? My son receives therapy through our public school. It is part of NY education law that the public schools have to offer special education services to homeschooled children.

 

The size of vocabulary shouldn't be an issue when it comes to therapy. My son just had his three year reevaluation meeting today and according to the psych eval he scores off the charts with vocabulary, phonemic awareness, expressive languare, receptive language etc etc. He was in the 99.9 percentile. He still qualifies for therapy.

 

If the speech issues are considered 'developmentally appropriate' then it can be an issue. For example, my son mispronounces 'r' but that isn't considered a speech delay because it is a later developing sound. However, he has issues with some vowel sounds so that qualifies him.

 

I would look into your state's special education law, it should be available online, to make sure that the whole 'homeschool' issue isn't being used to deny services that should be available. Just the fact that you were told that would have me checking it the legality of the situation. There is also the possiblity of challenging the initial evaluation. You can poke around at wright's law online. In this time of real budget cuts in the schools, they are looking for any way possible to deny services.

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I'm in the same state, but a different county. My child got accepted to speech therapy very easily because the parents/grandparents/friends couldn't understand him. He passed the test of various sounds (he can say all the age appropriate sounds), but he uses the wrong sounds for some words. The OP's DD is in a similar boat, but the evaluators in her county aren't so nice.

 

I think an appeal is in order.

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I just bought this for my 3yo. The e-book is 12.95 (I think) at currclick. I can't review it as far as how it works but it is laid out nicely and I've heard good things from other users. It helps you make an individualized speech therapy plan depending on which sounds your dc struggles with it. We have only used it for a week and my son does much better with the 'n' sound. It doesn't carry over into day to day speech yet but the programs says that will happen with practice.

I have Super Star Speech but haven't used it yet because I can't imagine doing it with my 3 year old. It seems to expect phonics knowledge. :confused:

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I have Super Star Speech but haven't used it yet because I can't imagine doing it with my 3 year old. It seems to expect phonics knowledge. :confused:

 

My copy is down in the school room (and I'm banished to my bedroom while the boys work on a birthday surprise), but I don't remember needing phonics knowledge at all.

 

I gave my son the pretest by saying the word and having him repeat it. Once I determined the sounds he needed to work on, we began tackling them one at a time. After showing him in front of a mirror how to form the sound, I read the list words and have him repeat them.

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I'm glad I came across this post! My 4 yo son just got qualified for speech at the local school, but was looking into what I could do at home to help. He only qualified for group therapy (a group of 4 boys) 2 days/week, 20 minutes each time. My son in only 30% intelligible and that's all he qualified for. Since his receptive language was strong, he didn't qualify for more. I can't afford the co-pays for private speech, so I need to figure something else out too.

 

I've been working on Phonics Pathways with him, but haven't seen any improvement yet. No carry-over into regular speech. I like how it blends the sounds together starting with just single syllables like P-I, P-O, P-U, etc. Then it adds on a third letter and so on. The problem is, that with so many sounds he can't properly produce, it's hard to go forward.

 

Gwen

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If your child is preschool aged, that is too young to be enrolled in kindergarten, then homeschooling should not come into play as to getting speech therapy. There are kids who get speech therapy at home who are not enrolled in school but it is covered by pre-school education. If you live in a state with mandetory pre-school enrollment then I guess it is different? In NY there is no universal preschool so they have to provide the therapy in the home to any preschooler. It didn't matter that I was going to homeschool because a four year old can't be 'schooled' by the state. There are pre-ks in my county but they are voluntary. The state can't force me to enroll my child to get services.

 

Group therapy is a bit of a joke. However, it can be really, really hard to get individual. Keep track of any regressions over school breaks and tell the therapist. Say "you know, we didn't see you last week and by the weekend it was harder to understand him." Make sure they know about all the times people don't understand him. Keep asking for individual.

 

When you have his IEP meetings you have to specifically request individual therapy. DOn't just go with what the therapist suggests. You might have to argue. When they give you the old "that is what the rules say' tell them that group therapy is not meeting his needs. If they tell you they don't have enough therapists..well.. that is NOT your problem. The federal law is very clear about that. If they use that as an excuse, that is a violation of the law.

 

It's like dealing with an insurance company. They will do anything to save a buck and they do NOT have your best interests at heart.

 

Ask the therapist for specific instructions on how to work with him. If you can, ask to sit in on a session. Tell her you want to hear what she says to him so you can help him at home.

 

If you think he needs more you can ask for it. It is not that big a deal. It isn't about 'what the rules say'. It is about what is meeting his needs. THey aren't supposed to just have a formula. And IEP is a legal document that is supposed to be about meeting his needs.

 

You can request in writing that his speech therapy sessions be increased to one individual session along with the group. They have to deal with you.

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I have Super Star Speech but haven't used it yet because I can't imagine doing it with my 3 year old. It seems to expect phonics knowledge. :confused:

 

Nope, we start by practicing the sound 'nnnn', 'nnnnn' (for example) than he imitates me in words that start with, have middle, or end sound of 'n'. There are games that we can't use because they assume phonics/reading knowledge, I'm guessing that is what you are referring to.

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My personal experience with Speech Therapy:

 

Son was almost completely unintelligible. Started therapy at about 3.5 yo.

He was misdiagnosed by the schools, and three private therapists, as having an articulation delay. Turns out he had oral motor apraxia - completely different therapy.

 

So - Make sure you know exactly WHY he is not speaking well - he needs to go have an extensive test with a speech Pathologist - not a therapist - and not at the schools.

 

If he is diagnosed with a speech issue there, insist on one-on-one therapy from the school (if he is diganosed by a pathologist the school will have to either accomodate or write a letter saying they cannot provide appropraite therapy).

 

If the school says no - have them write a letter explaining why, and get a copy of the IEP. Then start the long, arduous task of wrangling speech therapy (as medically necesarry) out of your insurance company.

 

I went through all of this (many times - every time we moved), and it was a pain, but my son had 30 minutes 3 times a week, one on one - and he never would have improved without it.

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My son was turned down for speech therapy too--twice. He could form all the letter sounds, (and more!) We eventually did the LiPS program at home. http://www.ganderpublishing.com/LiPS/ My son's speech problems seemed to stem from the fact that he confused similar sounds, so he put the wrong sounds in several words. LiPS taught him to distinguish different sounds. Also, at age 4, what they consider "normal" for that age might still be difficult to understand. Here's another website that I also find helpful. http://mommyspeechtherapy.com/?page_id=55

 

I will second LiPS. It is an outstanding program, and if the speech problems are due to some auditory processing problem, then LiPS lays a foundation you can use for years to come in teaching phonics and then spelling.

 

Heather

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