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Kindergartener: difference between b and d


Garga
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I put the word "bed" up on our whiteboard. If he gets them mixed up, I just point to the board and he corrects himself. As he's reading, I'll just correct him, as well. I've noticed a marked improvement over the last few months.

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If your child knows how to write a capitol B, have him/her look at the lowercase letter and draw a hump on the top part (physically at first, or with his finger, or in his head......whichever seems to work). If adding the hump makes a capitol B, it's b. If it's a backwards B, the letter is d. Anyway, that's what I've been doing with my K'er. Some days it works well and other days she still has issues.

 

My older daughter had the same trouble but eventually figured it all out. It's normal at this age.

 

Good luck!

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He's just little. Probably just reminding him each time he meets one or the other will be enough, KWIM? And I wouldn't give him too many different suggestions on how to remember.

 

Spalding teaches thusly:

 

They are never taught or discussed at the same time.

 

Letters that begin with circles are taught first, then letters that begin with lines.

 

d is a short letter with a tall part. It begins with a circle (the short part) and it ends with a line (the tall part). When you say /d/, your lips make sort of a circle.

 

b is a tall letter with a short part. It begins with a line (the tall part) and ends with a circle (the short part). When you say /b/, your lips make sort of a line.

 

When your ds meets one or the other, you can just give him the clues; sometimes just asking whether it begins with a circle or a line is enough to trigger the correct letter/sound.

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It is driving me crazy.

I tell my 5 yo boy that d starts with a belly first, than a big line, while b starts with a line and then a belly. We tried the bed and did not work.

I think mine will figure it out once we get to the lower case letters in HWOT. But not there yet...

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He's just little. Probably just reminding him each time he meets one or the other will be enough, KWIM? And I wouldn't give him too many different suggestions on how to remember.

 

Spalding teaches thusly:

 

They are never taught or discussed at the same time.

 

Letters that begin with circles are taught first, then letters that begin with lines.

 

d is a short letter with a tall part. It begins with a circle (the short part) and it ends with a line (the tall part). When you say /d/, your lips make sort of a circle.

 

b is a tall letter with a short part. It begins with a line (the tall part) and ends with a circle (the short part). When you say /b/, your lips make sort of a line.

 

When your ds meets one or the other, you can just give him the clues; sometimes just asking whether it begins with a circle or a line is enough to trigger the correct letter/sound.

 

 

:iagree:

I am teaching my DS 6 this way and it has helped a lot! He learned the "d" phonogram first, then a couple weeks later we introduced "b". When we review the phonogram sounds, I remind him that "d" is a short letter with a tall part and he can write it correctly. This is working better than the "bed" trick and I wish I'd done the same with my older two kiddo's!

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Thanks all! I think I'll go with the Back and Donut one first and see what happens.

 

I do know it's pretty normal, but still wanted to help him through it. He's learning to read and runs into words like "dog" or "beg." I think he'd like to be able to figure it out without just guessing.

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it takes a LONG time for little people to get those straight. That said, have you taught him cursive? It's very hard to get them backwards in cursive. If you don't want to go that route, just be patient and keep correcting-even AS he's writing it (if you wait until after it;s just cementing it in is head one more time)

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My daughter struggled with this, what finally helped was asking if the back (b) or the doughnut (d) came first on the letter. I read that somewhere on these forums and it really worked for us. HTH :001_smile:

 

:iagree:

 

I read that on here too. Using this, I saw improvements with my kids with this issue immediately. To remember it we say, "Back, B, /b/. Donut, D, /d/." My six-year-old has gotten to the point that she doesn't even have to say it out loud anymore, she just recognizes the correct letter.

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My little guy (5) is having a hard time telling the difference between b and d.

 

I've run out of ideas on how to help him remember. Anyone have an idea?

 

My 5 year old ds had this problem until I told him to pretend the "b" and the "d" were cars going in different directions. Although he does not have to do it anymore, he used his right and left hand to figure it out. He would sing (while using his thumbs), "The 'b' drives to the right and the 'd' drives to the left."

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LOVE IT! We use the bed one but I think I will introduce this. My dd loves anything about derrières

 

b has a belly; d has a derriere...my ds thought that was hilarious, and it cemented the idea in his mind. He still made mistakes but he'd mumble under his breath, "b has a..." Eventually, he got them right.
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