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Book a Week in 2010 - Week 45


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Sunday is the start of book week 45 and the quest to read 52 books in 52 weeks. Have you started Book # 45 yet? Mr. Linky is all set up on the 52 books blog and ready for you to link to your reviews.

 

52 Books blog - R is for rootless random ruminations. New books released by Nora Roberts and her alter ego J.D. Robb this week. Plus some new book discoveries. Oh and posted a picture of my nano book cover. Notice anything odd about the picture? It seems no one has so far. Maybe you'll be the first. *cheesy grin*

 

You didn't forget to see your clock back did you? I'm so used to the time change happening a certain time of year, my brain adjusted last weekend. Oy! Forgive me for posting saturday night, but I'm trying to avoid the blogosphere in the mornings while doing Nanowrimo. Just one glance at emails and I'm lost on the internet for a couple hours so the computer stays off until I get my writing done.

 

What are you reading this week?

Edited by Mytwoblessings
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Yep, even with nanowrimo and my short story class starting this week, I found time to read. Two new books out by Nora Roberts. The latest in the IN Death series "Indulgence in Death." This one's a hummer. You gotta pay closer attention or you'll lose track of the players. Plus the last book in her bride quartet series "Happy Ever After."

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Eek! There's been a tear in the space/time continuum!

 

Or did you just post early? I don't usually find this until Monday morning. :)

 

I read White Tiger, a Booker Prize winner. I enjoyed it.

 

I also read Lady Catherine's Necklace: A Jane Austen Entertainment by Joan Aiken. It was awful.

 

 

Rosie

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I seemed to be having trouble reading this past week. I am still working through Augustine's Confessions and The Forty Dreams of St. John Bosco. I also started Life of Johnson by James Boswell. All of this is slow going. Still reading Jo's Boys aloud to 9 yo. So I am just in the middle of all these thick or just plain old not conducive to fast reading books. Also NaNoWriMo is also impeding things.

 

Hopefully I'll finish one of these above this week!

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Eek! There's been a tear in the space/time continuum! Or did you just post early? I don't usually find this until Monday morning.

 

Lol! I posted early but we'll blame it on the space/time thing. Didn't think I'd have time this morning. But wrote 8 pages last night so have some time while eating breakfast. Happy Sunday!

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Last week I read E.L. Doctorow's Homer and Langley and new author Laurie Frankel's The Atlas of Love. Our own Kelli in TN recommended the latter and I'm so glad she did.

 

Yesterday I started Stegner's The Big Rock Candy Mountain. Thank goodness for that extra hour of sleep, and a free day today. I am loving this story!

Edited by Crissy
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I finished Claim to Fame by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Now I'm reading Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young Men by Leonard Sax because a friend recommended it. And I'm reading The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, and a Jew - Three Women Search for Understanding by Rayna Idliby, Suzanne Oliver, and Priscilla Warner for my church book club.

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I'll go with the space/time continuum because I feel I've been time travelling as my reading life has had me in Victorian England quite a bit recently.

 

I read Bill Bryson's At Home, which was fascinating, fun, and very random in all the things he covers. He goes into detail on architecture and architects of the 1700s and 1800s, health and disease, clothing, food, focusing mostly on England. It was oddly perfect to have paired it with Jane Eyre as Charlotte Bronte dwells on the scenery and setting, the details of which came more to life thanks to the Bryson book.. I'm now reading a biography of Charlotte Bronte.

 

Just to keep things from getting too serious I'm also reading another Terry Pratchett Discworld book.

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I finished two books this week:

 

#59 - Shane, by Jack Schaefer. Westerns are not my cuppa but this one was excellent. It was not a western in the *strict* sense of the word, imho. Not so much barroom brawling as a young boy learning important life issue's, and the psychological interplay between the adult characters. Schaefer is an excellent writer - every word drew me in, held my attention - tight writing with not one wasted word.

 

#60 - The Long Goodbye, by Patti Davis. Taken from the journals Ronald Reagan's daughter kept while her family watched their dad's full life succumbing bit by bit to Alzheimer's. Honest reflections, hard admissions, keen insight, deep grieving, lessons learned and being learned - all handled with skilled verbage.

 

Currently reading:

 

#61 - Elephant Bones and Lonelyhearts: Confessions Along My Nature Trail, by Ronald Rood.

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I read Behemoth because my dd & are reading this series (did I post the first one?) I'm working on another Vinyl Cafe book & am nearly done the Doing School book I mentioned. Unlike last year, this hasn't been a big literary year, but there's been so much going on it hasn't ended up being as important to me for now.

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For my book group, I read and enjoyed Nick Hornby's A Long Way Down. In the book, four people meet at the top of a building on New Year's Eve where they have all gone to commit suicide. It was an intriguing story.

 

Did you like this book?

 

 

I found it an interesting read, Karin. It is riddled with profanity; and it's also very British so I learned a few new terms. One of the reviews I read mentioned that the book is not so much about how to die as how to live. I'd agree. That said, it's not a book for everyone; however, it could lead to a lively (pun intended) discussion.

 

Regards,

Kareni

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I found it an interesting read, Karin. It is riddled with profanity; and it's also very British so I learned a few new terms. One of the reviews I read mentioned that the book is not so much about how to die as how to live. I'd agree. That said, it's not a book for everyone; however, it could lead to a lively (pun intended) discussion.

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

Thanks. I found it at the library and the profanity is bothering me. Is it worth finishing?

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Thanks. I found it [Nick Hornby's A Long Way Down] at the library and the profanity is bothering me. Is it worth finishing?

 

Well, I'm glad I finished it. The profanity will not decrease; it's consistent throughout the book. I think that not knowing the ending would have niggled at me ....

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Well, I'm glad I finished it. The profanity will not decrease; it's consistent throughout the book. I think that not knowing the ending would have niggled at me ....

 

Regards,

Kareni

 

Okay, I'll slug it out (I could simply cheat, but it wouldn't be the same). I don't know why the author has to use so much of it, realistic or not!

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