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Paisley Hedgehog
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I don't have a dyslexic, so take my advice with a grain of salt... ;)

 

My dd has trouble with the 'er' sound too. I think it's because she didn't say her "r's" correctly for so long. I end up reminding her a lot in her writing how to spell this phonogram (and all the "r" controlled ones). You may end up just reminding your child until it clicks. My dd always wants to put the vowel after the "r". I remind her almost every time she writes any "r" controlled phonogram! I try to pick the spelling dictation sentences with r controlled vowels to help her remember. You might also just have to keep this group of cards in the review slot for awhile and throw one in every once in a while to bring them to mind. Over the course of 2 years now I'm starting to see some progress in her.... I think the more your child sees these words the better it will get. I'm thinking there is probably a "ur" word bank as well. Be sure to have your child read through this... even daily for awhile. It would probably help seeing those words over and over.

 

Another little thing you could do with the "ur" in "nurse" is say.... "when you go to spell "nurse" you can remember this.... 'YOU (u) ARE ® a nurse".

 

Sometimes I make up goofy things like that to help my kids with stubborn trouble spellings. It's not going to help the rest of the words, but for that one it may be enough to trigger at least that word spelled correctly and then your dc might start to cue in on the other words in the list too....:001_smile:

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i'm not sure if this is accurate, but i have told my daughter that often if there is a root word, "er" will be used with it. i'm sure there are exceptions, but i can't think of any off the top of my head.

 

If you want to teach that as a rule, you will end up with lots of exceptions. While farmer, plumber, teacher, singer etc are spelled er, actor, sailor, traitor, decorator, legislator, burglar, lunar, muscular, liar etc obviously aren't.

 

To the OP, this is why my poor spellers never improved with just OG methodology b/c the answer to your question is yes, they just have to memorize the correct spelling. Finding "the how" to help them memorize the correct spelling is the challenge.

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Spend some time just reading these words. Have him read the word bank each day, and then at another time in your lesson, have him read the green word cards. These activities help build up the visual memory. Have him write the words, correctly put in the UR, and then circle the UR in each word and highlight the UR with a yellow highlighter to make a visual memory. You can use any of the ideas that Marie includes for "rule-breakers" to help cement the spellings (even though these aren't rule-breakers, those strategies help cement words that need to be learned visually). Continue having him practice with the UR phonogram card and sound card each day.

 

Use some tactile methods, show him the word card, and have him write it with the tactile method. That will bring in a kinesthetic learning opportunity in addition to just writing them.

 

Some patterns are harder for kids than others, hope this helps some! Merry :-)

Edited by MerryAtHope
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i'm not sure if this is accurate, but i have told my daughter that often if there is a root word, "er" will be used with it. i'm sure there are exceptions, but i can't think of any off the top of my head.

 

If you're saying "often," or "more often than not," that's pretty accurate, but I agree with 8FilltheHeart that there are a lot of exceptions.

 

ABC's & All Their Tricks lists 1737 words with ER in unstressed syllables (but not all of those are -er endings, "perhaps" would also fit this definition).

 

For AR in unstressed syllables, there are only 217 (words like dollar etc...)

 

For OR in unstressed syllables, 366 (words like color, calculator etc...)

 

Where we are, these are pronounced /er/ but pronouncing for spelling can help learn these--I always think "doc-TOR" or "dol-LAR" when I'm spelling, so that's another strategy that can be used to remember these in addition to visual strategies. A lot of the -or endings tend to be people/occupations, but that's not something that's always true. But sometimes it can help when grouping spellings in your mind.

 

Our language just plain has lots of ways to spell /er/, and not only at the end of a word! One of the reasons it's a challenge to learn!

 

Merry :-)

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Spalding WRTR has a rule for the sound of "er"

Sound "er" has 5 spellings: er, ir, ur, or, ear. The clue words are 'Her first nurse works early'

 

The phonograms er, ir, ur, or, ear are taught with the clue words. "er" of her, "ir" of first, "ur" of nurse, "ear" of early

 

My girls (not dyslexic) used to have this confusion too when we used AAS.

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Spalding WRTR has a rule for the sound of "er"

Sound "er" has 5 spellings: er, ir, ur, or, ear. The clue words are 'Her first nurse works early'

 

The phonograms er, ir, ur, or, ear are taught with the clue words. "er" of her, "ir" of first, "ur" of nurse, "ear" of early

 

My girls (not dyslexic) used to have this confusion too when we used AAS.

 

AAS teaches them individually with clue words as well--I guess I'm missing the "rule" part though?

 

Merry :-)

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He's on lesson 23 in AAS 4, which is a review of all of the words with the /er/ sounds.

 

I entered all of the spelling words from AAS levels 2-6 in the Spelling City site, including a separate list of 20 words with the /er/ sound. They're all in order and you can access them here if your dc would like to practice them using the games on the Spelling City site.

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Yes Spalding WRTR does have a rule for "er". It is Rule 8!

See here http://www.lewrockwell.com/taylor/taylor79.html

 

I read the linked article. I agree with parts of it and disagree with parts of it. There is a distinction between English being consistently phonetic for reading (which it is for approx 95% of all words) and being able to use phonics rules (like #8) to spell accurately.

 

Yes, frequency of use descends from er, ur, ir, or, to ear; however, knowing that rule is useless when trying to spell a word when the correct one is not memorized. The rule does not provide a tool for automatic determination of the correct phonogram.

 

FWIW, one part of the article I disagree with pertains to the discussion around tion, tious, etc. Those are actually easier to learn via morphology vs. phonology b/c word construction via morphemes is mostly consistent.

 

The other part I disagree with is that knowing all the phonograms/rules, etc creates good spellers. It may. It definitely does not automatically. I have 2 kids that know every phonogram and every rule and their spelling is phantasically fonetic but rong.

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I have 2 kids that know every phonogram and every rule and their spelling is phantasically fonetic but rong.
Ha! That was my eldest until we spent a summer accelerating through PR! Too funny!

 

I wanted to add, a word study, helps with this, too, as your student will at least gain some understanding of Latin, French, and German word origins. It at least gives the explanations as to why there are so many ways to say /er/. PR starts this in Level 3.

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I wanted to add, a word study, helps with this, too, as your student will at least gain some understanding of Latin, French, and German word origins. It at least gives the explanations as to why there are so many ways to say /er/. PR starts this in Level 3.

 

Does PR 3 have enough in it to be a good root program (thinking high school vocabulary building)? Or is it more supplemental information?

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Yes, frequency of use descends from er, ur, ir, or, to ear; however, knowing that rule is useless when trying to spell a word when the correct one is not memorized. The rule does not provide a tool for automatic determination of the correct phonogram.

 

Exactly. You can guess ER and be right more often than not perhaps, or you can memorize the lesser-used patterns and know that the rest of the word are all or mostly ER, but it's not really a rule you can pull out of your pocket and use.

 

FWIW, one part of the article I disagree with pertains to the discussion around tion, tious, etc. Those are actually easier to learn via morphology vs. phonology b/c word construction via morphemes is mostly consistent.

 

:iagree: A combination of strategies is going to give the student more tools to work with.

 

Merry :-)

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