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I'm having a painter come in and do a bid...


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Based on my experiences, I'd make sure you know who is actually going to be doing the job. The first time I hired painters for exterior work, the owner arrived in the morning to direct his crew. The crew however was 2 very young, very inexperienced kids. They made a mess. They step on every plant and flower I owned. I had paint splatters everywhere.

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I would prepare an official Request for Quote that details exactly what you want down to the very smallest detail. I'm sure you could find some kind of template online.

 

It could read something like the following:

 

Provide all labor and materials to repaint the walls and ceilings in the master bedroom, 2 guest bedrooms, hallway, 2 bathrooms, great room, and entry foyer at 1234 Main Street.

 

Contractor shall repair all nail holes, dings, dents and other marks prior to applying Sherwin Williams primer in preparation for paint.

 

Master bedroom shall be painted Burnt Sienna with two coats of Sherwin Williams XYZ satin sheen latex interior paint.

 

Trim in all rooms shall be painted with................

 

Contractor to provide all materials required to protect furniture and othe finished surfaces in all rooms.

 

Contractor will be responsible for moving furniture to allow for painting and returning furniture to its original location after painting.

 

 

Be sure to include any details or specifics you want that would affect the price. Things like color, brand of paint, number of coats, sheen, pre-paint preparation, who'll protect furniture in the rooms, times and days when the rooms are available or unavailable, desired duration of the job, etc.....

 

You can never provide too much detail in the RFQ. The contractor may take exception to some of the items, but he should make that clear in his bid.

 

I would get at least three quotes along with references from all three. You will need to balance the bid prices with the references. The lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

 

By giving each bidder the written RFQ, you can more easily compare the bids when you receive them.

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I just went through this. I received estimates from 3 people that came very highly recommended to me. I saw the actual work of 2 of them and both had done wonderful jobs. The 3rd painter -- I had not seen her actual work, but she wanted $19,400 to paint my whole house. I about fell over. She must paint in gold :-).

 

Anyway, the guy we went with had a wonderfully laid out contract that specificed what was included, what rooms will be done, how many coats of paint (2 on the walls and ceilings, 1 on the trim and doors). We are having our entire house painted except for 3 bathrooms. That includes all spindles on the stariway. All repairs to drywall (nail pops, settlement cracks), caulk around windows, doors and trim, etc. are included (repairs and supplies). Ask if paint is included in the price 'cause than can be quite a bit extra if not. Have them specify brand of paint also. That is the only problem we encountered. We hadn't discussed brand of paint because there is a big difference in cost between paint from Home Depot/Lowe's, Duron and Benjamin Moore. The new house being painted is empty so they don't need to move or protect furniture. They do need to carfully protect our newly refinished hardwood floors and newly installed hardwood floors. We pulled the carpet out and the new carpet isn't going in until the painting is finished.

 

I know the owner will be in and out several times a day (not on site all day), but he brought his crew leader to the estimate and I really liked him. He was pointing out things to be fixed that I hadn't noticed. There will be a crew of 4 additional people working also. I called references. One of them took pictures for me and sent them to me via email.

 

Anyway, it's kind of a stressful process, but good luck.

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You need to verify what type of finish you want in your paint, as well as color (i.e., eggshell, flat, semi-gloss, gloss, etc.). You need to determine what was used before and what type of paint will go over it and stick. You may want an oil base for your trim and doors, windows, etc. You may want an oil base in bathrooms (and you want to make sure he's comfortable painting with oil and that he doesn't water it down).

 

You want the estimate to include repair work such as fixing nail pops and retaping, if necessary. That's all I can think of right now....

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I would prepare an official Request for Quote that details exactly what you want down to the very smallest detail. I'm sure you could find some kind of template online.

 

It could read something like the following:

 

Provide all labor and materials to repaint the walls and ceilings in the master bedroom, 2 guest bedrooms, hallway, 2 bathrooms, great room, and entry foyer at 1234 Main Street.

 

Contractor shall repair all nail holes, dings, dents and other marks prior to applying Sherwin Williams primer in preparation for paint.

 

Master bedroom shall be painted Burnt Sienna with two coats of Sherwin Williams XYZ satin sheen latex interior paint.

 

Trim in all rooms shall be painted with................

 

Contractor to provide all materials required to protect furniture and othe finished surfaces in all rooms.

 

Contractor will be responsible for moving furniture to allow for painting and returning furniture to its original location after painting.

 

 

Be sure to include any details or specifics you want that would affect the price. Things like color, brand of paint, number of coats, sheen, pre-paint preparation, who'll protect furniture in the rooms, times and days when the rooms are available or unavailable, desired duration of the job, etc.....

 

You can never provide too much detail in the RFQ. The contractor may take exception to some of the items, but he should make that clear in his bid.

 

I would get at least three quotes along with references from all three. You will need to balance the bid prices with the references. The lowest bid isn't always the best deal.

 

By giving each bidder the written RFQ, you can more easily compare the bids when you receive them.

 

Also, make sure you specify that they will remove the tape, scrape any paint off of windows, do any touch-ups, etc.

 

When we had our house painted, we purchased all of the paint ourselves. That way, you make sure it's exactly what you want.

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