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So, I visited the Baptist church....


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Let's see if we can avoid getting this thread shut down like the other one, please.

 

Today we went to the church of which I spoke on the closed thread. My boys enjoyed it a lot--lots of games, stories from the Bible, enjoyable and lots of children during Sunday School.

 

I was of two minds. It was very informal and non-traditional, which, for someone used to an almost High Mass formality of an Episcopal Church was very different. The church was a new building, whereas my former church in nyc was a very old building with a huge amount of history (and as you can see from the What We Believe page, very open-minded and focused on the "three-legged stool": Scripture, tradition, and reason.) The people at the Baptist church were very nice today. The sermon was focused on John 3:1-20 and was quite focused on the Bible itself. There were, however, some things the pastor emphasized:

 

1. There is only one path to Salvation, and that is through Jesus Christ. You have two options: choose Jesus, or choose Hell. He equated this to when he disciplined his own children: Choose to obey me, kids, or choose spanking. Your choice." For someone who doesn't believe in corporal punishment, this was off-putting.

2. The church handout laid out that the church's mission is "reaching out to non-believers, to connect them to other Christians, and to help them grow in their faith, and to challenge the growing to serve Christ." The sermon was preceded by a video of how the church is reaching out to Indians to teach the message of Christ and convert them. I am not the converting type, and I believe that there are many ways to God (I mentioned this in the other post, so let's not harp on it here).

 

I liked the vibe of the church, but something struck me after the sermon. The husband of the wife who first invited me has never, in the past, said more than hello to me, despite our living in the same community and my friendship with his wife. But after the sermon, he came right up to me, very friendly-like, and asked after my husband (who didn't come as he is Jewish) and how his recent trip was, and how I enjoyed the sermon, and how my kids were...a total 180. That was weird.

 

So, I don't know what to think. I am not 100% aligned with the church's mission statement, but is that the important thing, or is it more crucial that I believe in Jesus, consider myself a Christian, and want my children to have a place where they can learn more about Christianity, alongside Judaism which their father is teaching?

 

I don't know.

 

ETA: Another thing I just remembered about the sermon. The pastor said "Remember, we are all rotten at our core. Utterly rotten." That didn't resonate with me.

Edited by Halcyon
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1. There is only one path to Salvation, and that is through Jesus Christ. You have two options: choose Jesus, or choose Hell. He equated this to when he disciplined his own children: Choose to obey me, kids, or choose spanking. Your choice." For someone who doesn't believe in corporal punishment, this was off-putting.

 

 

Since your dh is Jewish, I doubt this church will be a good fit. If you keep looking, I'm sure you'll find a better fit for your family situation.

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That is a tough one. I have never agreed 100% with any church I have attended. I don't think there is any denomination currently in existence with which I agree 100%. You may have to prioritize your beliefs. What do you feel is most important, something on which you are unwilling to compromise? What can you overlook? Does this church teach something that is completely offensive to you? Can you overlook that specific teaching because of the other positive qualities?

 

You often cannot get a full picture of a church based on one visit. You may have to visit a few more times before you can rule for or against the church. Most churches understand that. We've moved around quite a bit and visited many churches. As far as I know, we are not on any black lists or anything like that.

 

Good luck on your search.

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So, I don't know what to think. I am not 100% aligned with the church's mission statement, but is that the important thing, or is it more crucial that I believe in Jesus, consider myself a Christian, and want my children to have a place where they can learn more about Christianity, alongside Judaism which their father is teaching?

 

I don't know.

 

One thing to consider - how do you feel about what they are going to be teaching your children? If you disagree theologically with their message but send your kids to Sunday school, you are choosing to have them taught something you don't believe. If however their message isn't far off from your beliefs, then choosing the place just as a Christian experience for the kids won't be a big problem.

 

If you choose to continue there, keep an eye out for their attitude towards Judaism. If you sense they are negative about it, you need to quickly part with them because it may be a sign that they are very far from what you were looking for.

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So, I don't know what to think. I am not 100% aligned with the church's mission statement, but is that the important thing, or is it more crucial that I believe in Jesus, consider myself a Christian, and want my children to have a place where they can learn more about Christianity, alongside Judaism which their father is teaching?

 

I don't know.

I don't know that I could go to a church that I didn't believe a great many of its teachings. I don't want the church in my bedroom, finances or parenting so if there were more of the same the next few Sundays I wouldn't be able to stay. That is what you are going to have to decide.

 

Also I think what you described your friend's husband doing is really weird. On one hand it just smacks of being the "right kind" of Christian. On the other is seems like some kind of weird cultish thing that I can't properly put into words. (Not at all saying that Baptists are a cult.)

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:tongue_smilie:

 

Dh is Jewish and I am a gentile Christian. We are both Believers in Yeshua (Jesus) and it is dh's desire that we rear our dc in a Jewish lifestyle.

 

We attend a Messianic Jewish congregation, for Jewish and non-Jewish Believers and seekers, and it has been a good fit for us. Depending upon your location in FL, there may be a Messianic Jewish congregation in your area.

 

Here are a couple of links for you to explore if you are interested in learning more http://www.umjc.org/

 

http://www.mjaa.org/site/PageServer

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To be totally honest, it doesn't sound like a good fit for you. It seems pretty rigid. I agree with the pp about looking into a messianic temple. It would seem to be in line with what both you and your DH are trying to instill in your children.

 

I would also imagine it would be hard for you to fellowship with the other members of the congregation if they are as rigid as the pastor in regards to theology and parenting :(

 

Is there another basic Christian church in your area you could check out? We have a pretty big church that we attend that is bible believing but doesn't go into the rights and wrongs of how to parent and isn't fire and brimstone when it comes to God.

 

Good luck :grouphug:

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The church you attended in NYC and this one do seem worlds apart. Like you, I'd have a hard time with the messages you heard this Sunday. But, I'd also give it another trial Sunday - and if that was the same, I'd look elsewhere. It would be too hard for me to sit through hearing things which are so contrary to my own beliefs.

 

Is there an Episcopal church near you? I know that within the Episcopal church there are conservative and modern services, so it may take a bit of looking to find what you'd like. It just seems to me that you'd have a better chance of finding a good fit for your family there. Don't forget that if the pastor is preaching that way to the adults on Sunday, then the children are probably hearing a similar message too - even if it's more subtle, children pick up on it.

 

I think it's great that they're learning about their Jewish faith from their father and their Christian faith from you. :)

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It makes me sad that I don't think the mom or her family will become close friends with us if I don't join. Not that she won't be polite; she's a friendly lady, that's her nature. But I sense if we join I'd have a lot more friends, including her and her kids.

 

No, you won't have a lot more friends. You'll have a lot more people trying to convert your dh. IMHO, it's a lot better to be upfront about your beliefs and maintain a polite acquaintanceship, rather than make "friends" who will drop you when it's clear you (or your dh) will not join their church. It's a lot less painful for all concerned and when you do make friends, they'll appreciate you and your family for what you are. You just have to give it a bit of time to find them.

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I believe only you can decide whether or not you will feel comfortable going. I believe the church members will welcome you and your family as regular visitors for as long as you want but you probably should not join the church if you can't profess the same basic beliefs (ie- one path to salvation and the mandate to make converts). I do not think it is strange that the couple did a 180 when they saw you. They knew you probably didn't know anyone else and wanted to make you feel welcome and comfortable. I don't think it is any different than if I invited someone I casually knew to a playgroup. If they came, I would feel sort of like a host and feel responsible for making sure they had a good time and did not feel lonely even if we had never really talked much before.

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Let's see if we can avoid getting this thread shut down like the other one, please.

 

Today we went to the church of which I spoke on the closed thread. My boys enjoyed it a lot--lots of games, stories from the Bible, enjoyable and lots of children during Sunday School.

 

I don't know.

 

Somebody mentioned finding a different church that would fit your family better. How about a Messianic Jewish church? They believe in Jesus but also hold on to the Jewish traditions. Just something to consider as a possibility.

 

Holly

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It makes me sad that I don't think the mom or her family will become close friends with us if I don't join. Not that she won't be polite; she's a friendly lady, that's her nature. But I sense if we join I'd have a lot more friends, including her and her kids.

 

At the risk of sounding like a mom ;), But do you want to be friends with someone who has already placed conditions and judgment on you?

 

I can see where you're coming from, but it sounds like (from what you've described) that you're only in the "club" if you believe what they do. It seems like it could set you and your children up for hurt down the road when they call you out on something that they perceive as sinful?

 

(it happened to me :( )

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Regarding the husband's behavior, it could be that he is trying to be supportive. And it could have very well have been at his wife's prompting. I can totally see this happening in my family. My husband is quite shy and doesn't speak much to people he doesn't know well. In a situation like the one you were in, I would probably "gently encourage" (the way we wives sometimes do) my husband to crawl out of his shell and talk to you. And given his discomfort with speaking to those he doesn't know well, it would probably come across weird.

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A little AAM and my experiences growing up attending a Baptist church: my Dad was raised Baptist, but my mom was Catholic, and my brother and I were raised Catholic until my parents divorced when I was 10. By the time my stepmom became a Christian and I started going to a Baptist church with them, most all of the kids my age had already been saved (in the evangelical sense of the word), so I was immediately an outsider. In all the evangelical churches I'm familiar with, getting saved--this one time moment of conversion--is an all-important event. There's an altar call every Sunday; conversations in Sunday school regularly made it apparent which kids had been saved and which hadn't (like when we went around the room and told what we were thankful for; every kid in the room except me and my brother said "salvation."); people I barely recognized would know that I wasn't saved and would tell me they were praying for me. It was very, very uncomfortable for me. So I, personally, wouldn't put my kids in that situation--where they're being taught very clearly in church something completely different from what I believe and what I'm teaching them at home. I didn't even realize until college that most protestant denominations don't subscribe to evangelical beliefs about salvation. All of this with the disclaimer that I know nothing about this particular church and its beliefs; but the sermon you describe would set off red flags for me--are your kids going to be coming to you with questions about whether their father is going to hell?

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The church you attended in NYC and this one do seem worlds apart. Like you' date=' I'd have a hard time with the messages you heard this Sunday. But, I'd also give it another trial Sunday - and if that was the same, I'd look elsewhere. It would be too hard for me to sit through hearing things which are so contrary to my own beliefs.

 

Is there an Episcopal church near you? I know that within the Episcopal church there are conservative and modern services, so it may take a bit of looking to find what you'd like. It just seems to me that you'd have a better chance of finding a good fit for your family there. Don't forget that if the pastor is preaching that way to the adults on Sunday, then the children are probably hearing a similar message too - even if it's more subtle, children pick up on it.

 

I think it's great that they're learning about their Jewish faith from their father and their Christian faith from you. :)[/quote']

 

 

Thanks for your post. The Episcopal churches we've searched out here have no kids' programs, or basically nothing. Seems their congregation caters to the older people who live in Florida, not the families. I will try a UCC church--they have a strong AA program, an outreach program to homeless...these things appeal to me and make me thing it's a bit more liberal. The UCC church natiionally supports gay marriage, which a big deal for me.

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Somebody mentioned finding a different church that would fit your family better. How about a Messianic Jewish church? They believe in Jesus but also hold on to the Jewish traditions. Just something to consider as a possibility.

 

Holly

 

 

Thanks. While my husband is Jewish by upbringing, he considers himself agnostic, if not atheist. He has no interest in attending temple, but goes with the kids occasionally so they can learn about it and decide for themselves. He is not allowed to badmouth either religion in front of the kids ;)

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At the risk of sounding like a mom ;), But do you want to be friends with someone who has already placed conditions and judgment on you?

 

I can see where you're coming from, but it sounds like (from what you've described) that you're only in the "club" if you believe what they do. It seems like it could set you and your children up for hurt down the road when they call you out on something that they perceive as sinful?

 

(it happened to me :( )

 

I know you're right. It would just be so nice to be involved in an active and friendly community--i haven't found that here in Florida since moving here, and I miss it! I know you're right though. My friend, while lovely, is definitely of the mind that Jesus is the only way, and the pastor emphasized that good works will never,ever get you into heaven. I disagree with that, too. :001_rolleyes:

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I don't mean to be disrespectful, but why would you chose to attend a church that preaches that you and your husband will be going to hell?

 

I mean, you have already stated that you do not share their belief that there is only one way to salvation, so, by their definition, you are going to hell. Your husband is definitely going to hell (by their definition). Your children will be caught between what they are being taught at church and what you believe and live at home.

 

You also don't share the church's view of parenting or several other of their key beliefs.

 

But somehow you think it is a good idea for your children to attend there and to live a lie of pretending their parents believe like the other church members do.

 

:confused: :confused: :confused:

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I don't mean to be disrespectful, but why would you chose to attend a church that preaches that you and your husband will be going to hell?

 

I mean, you have already stated that you do not share their belief that there is only one way to salvation, so, by their definition, you are going to hell. Your husband is definitely going to hell (by their definition). Your children will be caught between what they are being taught at church and what you believe and live at home.

 

You also don't share the church's view of parenting or several other of their key beliefs.

 

But somehow you think it is a good idea for your children to attend there and to live a lie of pretending their parents believe like the other church members do.

 

:confused: :confused: :confused:

 

I don't think it's living a lie. The church states openly that they are open to all people, including those "on the path" and those "with doubts." I think there's room for disagreement, and coming together, even in a church.

 

Maybe I'm wrong though. I do think the "one path" is a deal breaker. I guess I just liked the people, am seeking a community, and have been having a hard time finding the right place for my family. I guess I just wanted it to feel right...but it probably isn't right. :sad:

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I'm answering this as someone who is of the "flavor" that you are describing in this church you visited.

 

Frankly, if you are not open to the most basic of basics in their doctrine (that Christ is the only way to salvation), then you should politely say, "thanks, but no thanks". Otherwise you are stringing them along and it is setting the stage for something very ugly to happen in the near future. There WILL come a point where beliefs are going to collide, and I would hate to see your children get stuck in the middle of it, kwim?

:iagree:

It makes me sad that I don't think the mom or her family will become close friends with us if I don't join. Not that she won't be polite; she's a friendly lady, that's her nature. But I sense if we join I'd have a lot more friends, including her and her kids.

You probably would and she probably won't. It sounds like she wants like minded friends for her young ones.

I believe only you can decide whether or not you will feel comfortable going. I believe the church members will welcome you and your family as regular visitors for as long as you want but you probably should not join the church if you can't profess the same basic beliefs (ie- one path to salvation and the mandate to make converts). I do not think it is strange that the couple did a 180 when they saw you. They knew you probably didn't know anyone else and wanted to make you feel welcome and comfortable. I don't think it is any different than if I invited someone I casually knew to a playgroup. If they came, I would feel sort of like a host and feel responsible for making sure they had a good time and did not feel lonely even if we had never really talked much before.

:iagree: Also, Sundays (for us) are so much more comfortable than the other days of the week. At church, I'm much more cheerful in general. The same could be said of me, as was said of the husband.

 

I know you're right. It would just be so nice to be involved in an active and friendly community--i haven't found that here in Florida since moving here, and I miss it! I know you're right though. My friend, while lovely, is definitely of the mind that Jesus is the only way, and the pastor emphasized that good works will never,ever get you into heaven. I disagree with that, too. :001_rolleyes:

These things are not something that many are willing to shrug off. Like the first poster I quoted said, these are basic beliefs. I would not be surprised if your dc already learned some of it after one Sunday school class.

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Thanks for your post. The Episcopal churches we've searched out here have no kids' programs, or basically nothing. Seems their congregation caters to the older people who live in Florida, not the families. I will try a UCC church--they have a strong AA program, an outreach program to homeless...these things appeal to me and make me thing it's a bit more liberal. The UCC church natiionally supports gay marriage, which a big deal for me.

 

Those sound like a much better fit. My church is actively working on becoming "open and affirming" which is the UCC speak for that it welcomes those who identify as gay. Our sermon today was on Homosexuality and the Bible (and I'm sure that's interpreted entirely differently than it would be in a conservative church), although I missed it because I brought the middle school kids on a field trip to the local Hindu Temple (middle school is learning about world religions). :tongue_smilie: I find much more commonality in beliefs to Hinduism (definitely many paths up the mountain there) than conservative Christianity, ironically...

 

The Unity church also sounds like a good bet. Episcopal churches can be quite liberal or more conservative, if you find one of the former, it could also be a better fit.

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Those sound like a much better fit. My church is actively working on becoming "open and affirming" which is the UCC speak for that it welcomes those who identify as gay. Our sermon today was on Homosexuality and the Bible (and I'm sure that's interpreted entirely differently than it would be in a conservative church), although I missed it because I brought the middle school kids on a field trip to the local Hindu Temple (middle school is learning about world religions). :tongue_smilie: I find much more commonality in beliefs to Hinduism (definitely many paths up the mountain there) than conservative Christianity, ironically...

 

The Unity church also sounds like a good bet. Episcopal churches can be quite liberal or more conservative, if you find one of the former, it could also be a better fit.

 

Thank you so much. Yes, I think my Episcopal Church in nyc was very open-minded, and the two I've visited down here...not so much.

 

I will visit the UCC Church next week--ugh, I hate "church shopping!" But i need to feel like I am in the right place.

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I don't think it's living a lie. The church states openly that they are open to all people, including those "on the path" and those "with doubts." I think there's room for disagreement, and coming together, even in a church.

 

Maybe I'm wrong though. I do think the "one path" is a deal breaker. I guess I just liked the people, am seeking a community, and have been having a hard time finding the right place for my family. I guess I just wanted it to feel right...but it probably isn't right. :sad:

 

Just want to say that the Episcopal church *officially* teaches that there is one path to God, too. And the legs of the "3 Legged Stool" are not equal; Scripture trumps reason and tradition. Officially.

Just sayin'.

 

Make sure you search the doctrine of any church or body very carefully. Not all who go to the "meetings" believe what the body officially teaches.

 

Unity is not Christian. Don't know if that matters to you.

 

I wouldn't continue to go to the church you've visited. If your kids get really invested there and start believing stuff you don't want them to, and you decide to change churches, it will be really hard.

 

OTOH, maybe God is calling you to investigate the whole "one path" thingy, and giving you a place that may allow Him to convince you of some things you don't yet believe.

 

Good luck in whatever your journey brings you!

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I was thinking that if you feel comfortable giving out your zip code, some of us (speaking for myself here) could ask our pastors/friends/etc for a recommended church in your area?

 

I believe there is a church finder type website too.....I just feel so bad that you can't seem to find somewhere that would be a good fit. PM me if you want and I can ask our pastor if he has any suggestions :)

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I was thinking that if you feel comfortable giving out your zip code, some of us (speaking for myself here) could ask our pastors/friends/etc for a recommended church in your area?

 

I believe there is a church finder type website too.....I just feel so bad that you can't seem to find somewhere that would be a good fit. PM me if you want and I can ask our pastor if he has any suggestions :)

 

 

Nah, don't want to give out my zip, but I have used a UCC church finder to find a church nearby. Maybe it will be a fit :)

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Unity is not Christian. Don't know if that matters to you.

 

While I'm sure that those who think they have the One defintion of Christianity would not call the Unity church Christian, they certianly identify themselves as coming from the Christian tradition.

 

From a Unity flyer I picked up at a church (I said I was intrigued ;)):

 

Unity Church of God applies foundation Christian traditions to see the good in others, and to better ourselves, our relationships and our world.

 

The 5 principles of Unity:

 

1. There is One presence and One power active in the Universe, God; and God is absolute good, everywhere present.

2. Every human being has a spark of divinity within, the Christ spirit. Our essence is of God and, therefore, inherently good.

3. We create our experiences by the activity of our thought. Everything that appears in our lives has its beginning in though.

4. Prayer and meditation are the best ways we can heighten our connection with God.

5. Knowing and understanding Unity principles are a beginning - we must also live the truth we know.

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While I'm sure that those who think they have the One defintion of Christianity would not call the Unity church Christian, they certianly identify themselves as coming from the Christian tradition.

 

From a Unity flyer I picked up at a church (I said I was intrigued ;)):

 

Unity Church of God applies foundation Christian traditions to see the good in others, and to better ourselves, our relationships and our world.

 

The 5 principles of Unity:

 

1. There is One presence and One power active in the Universe, God; and God is absolute good, everywhere present.

2. Every human being has a spark of divinity within, the Christ spirit. Our essence is of God and, therefore, inherently good.

3. We create our experiences by the activity of our thought. Everything that appears in our lives has its beginning in though.

4. Prayer and meditation are the best ways we can heighten our connection with God.

5. Knowing and understanding Unity principles are a beginning - we must also live the truth we know.

 

 

It does sound nice, doesn't it? I'm a hippie at heart though....:lol:

Edited by Halcyon
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It makes me sad that I don't think the mom or her family will become close friends with us if I don't join. Not that she won't be polite; she's a friendly lady, that's her nature. But I sense if we join I'd have a lot more friends, including her and her kids.

Yeah, but hon, you can make friends at any church you join. Putting strings on friendships, be it religion, politics, parenting style, whatever, isn't a real friendship.

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Just want to say that the Episcopal church *officially* teaches that there is one path to God, too. And the legs of the "3 Legged Stool" are not equal; Scripture trumps reason and tradition. Officially.

Just sayin'.

 

Make sure you search the doctrine of any church or body very carefully. Not all who go to the "meetings" believe what the body officially teaches.

 

Unity is not Christian. Don't know if that matters to you.

 

I wouldn't continue to go to the church you've visited. If your kids get really invested there and start believing stuff you don't want them to, and you decide to change churches, it will be really hard.

 

OTOH, maybe God is calling you to investigate the whole "one path" thingy, and giving you a place that may allow Him to convince you of some things you don't yet believe.

 

Good luck in whatever your journey brings you!

:iagree: Well put :)

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I am methodist and that isn't too far different than episcopal. You should try a local methodist church. Their motto is officially open hearts, open minds, open doors. We do believe salvation is the way to heaven but our pastors do not tell you how to parent or take an official stance on spanking.

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Just want to say that the Episcopal church *officially* teaches that there is one path to God, too. And the legs of the "3 Legged Stool" are not equal; Scripture trumps reason and tradition. Officially.

Just sayin'.

 

Make sure you search the doctrine of any church or body very carefully. Not all who go to the "meetings" believe what the body officially teaches.

 

Unity is not Christian. Don't know if that matters to you.

 

I wouldn't continue to go to the church you've visited. If your kids get really invested there and start believing stuff you don't want them to, and you decide to change churches, it will be really hard.

 

OTOH, maybe God is calling you to investigate the whole "one path" thingy, and giving you a place that may allow Him to convince you of some things you don't yet believe.

 

Good luck in whatever your journey brings you!

 

 

Hmm. I think that depends on your definition of Christianity. They seem to define themselves as follows (acc. to Wikipedia): The Unity Church describes itself as a "positive, practical Christianity" which "teach[es] the effective daily application of the principles of Truth taught and exemplified by Jesus Christ" and promotes "a way of life that leads to health, prosperity, happiness, and peace of mind."

 

There's more info here: http://unity.org/aboutunity/whoWeAre/faq.html#denomination

Edited by Halcyon
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I think you'd be welcome at the Baptist church, but I do think if you are vocal about your beliefs that they are going to assume you are not a Christian. In which case you would be considered a mission field.

 

They are going to assume you are not a Christian because man's sinful nature, his need for a savior, and Christ as the ONLY means by which one is saved are non-negotiable doctrines in most mainstream denominations. Though, as evidenced, there are individual churches who reject these teachings.

 

I think you are going to find those foundational truths will pretty much permeate that church.

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It makes me sad that I don't think the mom or her family will become close friends with us if I don't join. Not that she won't be polite; she's a friendly lady, that's her nature. But I sense if we join I'd have a lot more friends, including her and her kids.

 

two thoughts:

 

true friendship doesn't require membership in a group.

 

and

 

given that they believe your dh is going to hell because he isn't christian, i can't quite see how you could truly worship with them. i wouldn't want your kids to come to believe that, either.

 

fwiw,

ann

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two thoughts:

 

given that they believe your dh is going to hell because he isn't christian, i can't quite see how you could truly worship with them. i wouldn't want your kids to come to believe that, either.

 

fwiw,

ann

 

 

Do they REALLY think that? I guess they do, on reflection. I can't imagine knowing with certainty that anyone is going to Hell...or Heaven, for that matter. Who can know the mind of God?

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Do they REALLY think that? I guess they do, on reflection. I can't imagine knowing with certainty that anyone is going to Hell...or Heaven, for that matter. Who can know the mind of God?

Well, it says that the only way to the Father is through the son. If you believe the words of Christ :shrug: then it is what it is.

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Just want to say that the Episcopal church *officially* teaches that there is one path to God, too. And the legs of the "3 Legged Stool" are not equal; Scripture trumps reason and tradition. Officially.

Just sayin'.

 

Make sure you search the doctrine of any church or body very carefully. Not all who go to the "meetings" believe what the body officially teaches.

 

Unity is not Christian. Don't know if that matters to you.

 

I wouldn't continue to go to the church you've visited. If your kids get really invested there and start believing stuff you don't want them to, and you decide to change churches, it will be really hard.

 

OTOH, maybe God is calling you to investigate the whole "one path" thingy, and giving you a place that may allow Him to convince you of some things you don't yet believe.

Good luck in whatever your journey brings you!

 

:iagree:

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Do they REALLY think that? I guess they do, on reflection. I can't imagine knowing with certainty that anyone is going to Hell...or Heaven, for that matter. Who can know the mind of God?

 

Yes, they do. They really believe you are going to hell if you haven't repented and committed yourself to Jesus.** Your husband and children too.

They know the mind of God because the Bible tells them what it is.

Case closed. . . for them :)

 

I would know. :(

 

Then, once you've taken your children to this church long enough they are going to come to believe it, and they are going to be grieved that you and their Daddy are going to hell.

 

I have a friend going through this right now. She was seeking Christianity as I was getting out. I tried very carefully to warn her about this, but . . . there you go. Her 5th grade daughter is now frantic believing her father and mother are going to hell. Mom can't believe this is happening. She just wanted for her children to have a community.

 

Best to you.

 

T.

 

**This is the reason for evangelistic missions. All of those people going abroad to share the gospel are doing so because they believe people are going to hell. There's an excellent blog counter that I've seen on some of my friends blogs. It shows you "how many people have gone to hell since you opened this web page." Honestly, this is not a fringe belief; it's just a conservative one.

Edited by freethinkermama
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I agree with others...Keep looking...I know since we are looking right now, trying to find a church that is a good fit is uncomfortable and tedious. We have visited at least 10 and are still looking. On the other hand, no church will be an exact fit. So, it could be helpful to make a list of what are the most important things you are looking for. Good luck:)

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I am methodist and that isn't too far different than episcopal. You should try a local methodist church. Their motto is officially open hearts, open minds, open doors. We do believe salvation is the way to heaven but our pastors do not tell you how to parent or take an official stance on spanking.

 

i'm methodist too. a little off-topic here....but the UMC church does have an official stance on spanking, which is they do not support it. my pastor has never preached about it or anything of course, but i thought it was awesome that our denomination was willing to take an official stance against it:D

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