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What does this phonics substitution mean?


delaney
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Say it slow. I can hear how she might think that. For us, until ds was a better speller, he had issues with this sort thing. Some words he could not say correctly (or spell) without just memorizing the spelling. IOW, sometimes we had to use whole word method to help him with his phonics... I hope that makes sense ;)

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I found an issue with DD's phonics. She spelled strap "schrap":confused: Obviously she is hearing the sounds as we say them so she actually applied phonics correctly. I am concentrating on str- words this week in spelling for her.

 

 

The thing I notice is that the movements of the tongue are very similar for a tr compared to a ch. Both times the tongue is to the roof of the mouth. The consonant /t/ sound is made with the tip of the tongue and the tongue is a little curled, while the /ch/ sound has a more flattened tongue at the roof of the mouth--for me I kind of press the sides of my tongue against my upper teeth and make the sound with the near-front part of my tongue pressed against the roof of my mouth, rather than the tip.

 

If you look at the shape of the lips, for the /ch/ and for the /r/ sound, the lips are kind of curled out a bit in an O shape for both.

 

Given all these similarities, it's understandable that some kids might confuse them. You could try exaggerating the sounds a bit, pronouncing the /t/ sound first, and then finishing out the word. You could "say it slowly" at first, and then say it fast. Have her also do this, so she can hear the individual sounds. Encourage her to pay attention to how the sounds feel in her mouth, what part of her tongue she is using etc... Make sure that she can say the sounds correctly--if she understands that, then it's just a matter of hearing them, and that will probably come with time. In context I'll bet she would struggle less, and that might be another thing you could do--put the word in a sentence, ie, "Tree. You climbed up a tree."

 

It might also help if she segmented the words out loud first--then you could hear if she is pronouncing them correctly.

 

I agree that there are very few--if there are any at all--English words that use chr where the ch says /ch/ as in much rather than /k/ as in Christmas. Merry :-)

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:confused1: Ok, I understand the part about the lips/tongue being similar for the two sounds, but I can't figure how they sound the same...... Am I missing something? Would saying it while she wasn't watching your mouth help since she could focus on the sound and not on your mouth?

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:confused1: Ok, I understand the part about the lips/tongue being similar for the two sounds, but I can't figure how they sound the same...... Am I missing something?

 

A lot of people say "schrap" instead of "strap". I know I tend to, but if I were pronouncing it for spelling, I'd say "strap". In my area, I think most people say "chr" for "tr". We're just technically pronouncing it wrong. ;)

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:confused1: Ok, I understand the part about the lips/tongue being similar for the two sounds, but I can't figure how they sound the same...... Am I missing something? Would saying it while she wasn't watching your mouth help since she could focus on the sound and not on your mouth?

 

Probably not--I'm guessing that it *sounds* like "schrap" to her. Like the pp said, in many areas "tr" sounds like "chr" unless you enunciate very carefully. All it takes is forcing a little too much air out on the "tr" sound. If you're dictating spelling words, you'll need to sound it out carefully and slowly, being careful not to elide the "tr" into a "chr" sound. And you'll want to have her repeat it to you, making sure she's saying it (and therefore *hearing* it) correctly too.

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I think occasional mistakes like these are *very* common. The fact that she *is* spelling the way she hears words spoken and in a consistent way is very good and encouraging. (Less encouraging would be if she tried to spell "strap" as "prats" or "stmp", showing that she can't recognize the order of the sounds in relation to the marks on the page or the correct sounds for the word.) You'll enunciate a little better for a bit, you guys will discuss the words, and she'll get it. :)

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We've run into this too, with the word truck. We worked on the pronunciation, and now he knows how to articulate it well for spelling. We have similar issues with some dr words like drive sounding a bit like jrive. Of course this looks bizarre, but to my ds it makes sense to how he hears the word. We just have to "say to spell" around here. :)

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We talk about how words change and how over time we are sometimes simply lazy with our phonics. I tend to say Chree, too, so I make sure I EEnunCIATE, especially for spelling and point this out to dc when we introduce (inCHroduce) these words ;)

 

Glad to see she's spelling phonetically well, though!

Yes I see this too...but then I think that since everyone seems to speak that way she had better learn to memorize the words since life is not a spelling bee, right? Wouldn't it be hard to take notes in a class if you couldn't spell simple words? That is what alarmed me. I really think her resistance to reading has hindered her spelling. Hopefully we are correcting that somewhat this year by not having to read for the ALMIGHTY AR POINTS!!!:glare:

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