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If you teach your child a language that uses non-latin script . . .


mohop
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We plan on teaching our kids Arabic from a young age. We will probably hold off on doing Latin until they are older (if we do it at all; I'm honestly more inclined to have them learn another modern foreign language like Spanish).

 

Obviously, Arabic is a language that uses a different script than English. It's also read from right to left instead of left to right. So we will need to start from scratch with teaching alphabet, reading, and writing. In planning ahead for when we start formal schooling, one thing I'm not sure about is whether I should first just focus on English reading/writing and save the Arabic reading/writing until my kids have a pretty good grasp on English, or whether I should essentially be teaching the two simultaneously. What do others generally do? Does anyone know what the pros/cons of one method or the other would be?

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my kids go to chinese school on saturdays and they learn to read simplified chinese as they learn conversation. my son is almost 3 and my daughter is almost 6. i don't think it interferes with english learning at all.

 

my daughter also takes spanish, she does sometimes get confused when trying to read spanish, because the alphabet is the same but the sounds are not. it still isn't much of a problem but it is more of a problem than it is with the mandarin.

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I started teaching my oldest both English and Arabic alphabets concurrently, but when he started reading English backwards, I put Arabic reading on the back burner. We did some basic vocabulary, but mostly focussed on Quran and dua' (both memorizing and understanding).

 

Once my oldest's English took off, we settled down into learning (again) the Arabic. Since we're mostly working on Quran at this point, he's been using the Qaidah Nuraniyyah. Thankfully we're almost done, and when we are he will read through Juz Amma and then go back to Surat ul-Baqara, reading to gain fluency. From there we'll do either part-time or full-time hifzh, I think (insha'Allah).

 

We're also going through the kids' version of the Madinah Arabic series, but I'm using the book as a reference for myself more than the kids. I don't want to sit them down to fill out the workbook, I want them to speak. For me, exposing them to the language is a must from the beginning, but my oldest got too mixed up with the left to right vs. right to left parts to learn both together.

 

My youngest (4) is starting to read pretty well now and so far shows fewer signs of mixing things around, so I'm about to start the Arabic alphabet with him.

 

I think a lot of it just depends on the kid, honestly. But I hope this helps, at least some. :)

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Thanks for the responses. We've already started introducing the arabic alphabet to DD, mostly through puzzles and songs. But I'm just not sure where to go from here. I like the idea of just going along with both and seeing how each child responds. I would be fine just holding off for a while with the Arabic, but I do want my kids to be able to read Quran at a fairly young age.

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Dd10 was in a bilingual English-Arabic Montessori-style kindergarten class for a short while. They did half the morning in an English classroom, then swapped to an Arabic classroom. Each classroom had all posters etc in the appropriate language, and only that language was spoken. We weren't there long enough for me to have any real experience to offer, but the system itself had been running for some years, so was obviously working for them.

 

I am now trying to teach dd the Arabic alphabet (although I don't speak myself) and it's a hard slog. I wish I had started earlier (and I wish the school she attended that did Arabic as a foreign language had actually done a decent job, but that's another issue).

 

Nikki

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I am now trying to teach dd the Arabic alphabet (although I don't speak myself) and it's a hard slog.

 

Have you seen the battery operated puzzles? We won't be starting Arabic for another few years so I don't have one yet, but they look useful.

 

Scroll down: http://www.desidollcompany.com/alphabet-puzzle/

 

 

Rosie

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I prefer to begin teaching other languages after my children have a firm grasp on reading and writing in English (we're doing Latin and Hebrew here). However, if I were fluent in a second language, I'd probably expose them to that language from the start.

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