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Will a slate floor become "dated"?


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I'm planning to completely remodel my house, and I really want it to be timeless rather than "so 2010".

 

I loved the slate floors we put in our last house, and planned to put them in here too, but now I'm wondering if it is such a good idea.

 

Wood floors would look the best, but wood won't stand up to the barn dirt and animals.

 

My best friend suggested a flagstone floor. Wouldn't that look awesome in a farmhouse?

 

Slate would be easier to put in, but not worth the money if it is just going to go out of style.

 

What do you think?

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I love slate, my mom loves slate, and we've been talking about how cool it would be to have a slate floor for at least 10 years, so I don't think "2010" when I see a slate floor. I think, "Awesome, beautiful, wish it was mine!"

Edited by AndyJoy
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I'm planning to completely remodel my house, and I really want it to be timeless rather than "so 2010".

 

I loved the slate floors we put in our last house, and planned to put them in here too, but now I'm wondering if it is such a good idea.

 

Wood floors would look the best, but wood won't stand up to the barn dirt and animals.

 

My best friend suggested a flagstone floor. Wouldn't that look awesome in a farmhouse?

 

Slate would be easier to put in, but not worth the money if it is just going to go out of style.

 

What do you think?

 

I have seen turn-of-the century homes in the upper midwest that sported slate floors. I think they are lovely.

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It sounds beautful. :-) I don't think flagstone will go out of style, because it's not trendy to begin with. When I think of trendy, faux painting comes to mind, or super light laminate flooring. My only hesitation would have to do with comfort. Stone floors are hard and cold. But if you don't mind that, I think they'd be lovely.

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My only hesitation would have to do with comfort. Stone floors are hard and cold. But if you don't mind that, I think they'd be lovely.

 

 

Yes. This. Our kitchen is flagstone. I would probably think it lovely if I didn't have to have it under my feet all winter long. It is very cold and very uncomfortable to be standing on for very long.

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I think it would be pretty and timeless, but I would have some reservations. 1) As you get older, it's very likely that it's going to hurt to walk on stone floors and it will hurt the joints of many older guests you have if they are there for long. There is nothing much you can do about that if it happens. Wearing well padded shoes helps, but only so much. 2) I would be concerned that slate would break if something heavy were dropped on it and that it would be a pain to fix. (That's based on slate walkways, not floors, so perhaps it's not a concern.)

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I think it would be pretty and timeless, but I would have some reservations. 1) As you get older, it's very likely that it's going to hurt to walk on stone floors and it will hurt the joints of many older guests you have if they are there for long. There is nothing much you can do about that if it happens. Wearing well padded shoes helps, but only so much. 2) I would be concerned that slate would break if something heavy were dropped on it and that it would be a pain to fix. (That's based on slate walkways, not floors, so perhaps it's not a concern.)

:iagree:My parent put a slate entrance way in. It promptly broke when my bro dropped groceries om it.

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Thanks!

 

Since I've had stone floors before, I know about how cold they are. That is actually welcomed, because it is so hot here.

 

Carpet and wood are just not durable enough for the abuse my floor takes, and I really hate laminate, so I think my choices are just between stone and ceramic tile. Both of them can be painful to stand on for long periods. I prefer the look of stone.

 

Slate tiles would be very simple, because the same person could install them that did our last house. He works for a builder, and does nothing but install slate tiles day after day.

 

Free form flagstone would be more of a challenge. I'd have to find someone with experience installing it.

 

Does anyone think the flagstone would look BETTER than the slate?

 

My old house was country French style, so I had the slate tiles set on the diagonal, which was pretty. This house is a one story farmhouse. I think diagonal tiles would not go as well with the style of the house as plain straight ones would.

 

I just want to do this once, and be happy with it forever.

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I just want to do this once, and be happy with it forever.

 

I'm all about wood floors, we have a farm, horses ..we're back and forth to the barn daily, tracking red clay mud in...dogs are running through the house...the key to a wood floor is not to skimp!

 

We chose white oak (harder than red oak) and the type that has thickness (nailed down) where you can re-sand every 7-8 years and the floors will last you 50 years...there are also topical treatments that are wonderful and nothing penetrates...I've had ice melting that I missed and my 4 coats of finish (used 1 coat of stain and 3 coats of finish, buffing in between each coat) and it just puddles up...Duraseal is the best finish in my opinion, more expensive but worth it.

 

HTH!

Tara

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I love the looks of slate, and I don't mind cold floors. The only thing I would be concerned with is that the slate tile that I have seen is extremely uncomfortable for walking barefoot--it has a specific kind of rough texture that is actually painful. Now, I don't go barefoot myself (Flylady and plantar fascitis have cured me of that habit) but I would hesitate to eliminate the capability of comfortable barefoot walking in a space that a lot of people would use for a long time.

 

I would probably consider dark ceramic or granite tile. I have some ceramic tile on my hearth that looks like marble, and would consider it for the kitchen if we ever redid it.

 

Also, just FYI, Williams Sonoma has unbelievable cushy floor mats to put at kitchen stations now--better than those at culinary academies!

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I'm all about wood floors, we have a farm, horses ..we're back and forth to the barn daily, tracking red clay mud in...dogs are running through the house...the key to a wood floor is not to skimp!

 

We chose white oak (harder than red oak) and the type that has thickness (nailed down) where you can re-sand every 7-8 years and the floors will last you 50 years...there are also topical treatments that are wonderful and nothing penetrates...I've had ice melting that I missed and my 4 coats of finish (used 1 coat of stain and 3 coats of finish, buffing in between each coat) and it just puddles up...Duraseal is the best finish in my opinion, more expensive but worth it.

 

HTH!

Tara

:iagree: We have a finish called Traffic (I wonder if it's similar to Duraseal? I'm not familiar with that). It is meant for restaurants, etc. It is a matte finish rather than shiny. It's been five years and we have not re-coated the floors at all - they look great - which is amazing considering what our six kids have done and continue to do to them.

 

I guess that's a long way of saying that wood floors can work wonderfully if you choose an especially durable finish :)

 

But if you end up with stone, I also recommend the radiant heating - stone holds the heat nicely.

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Also, just FYI, Williams Sonoma has unbelievable cushy floor mats to put at kitchen stations now--better than those at culinary academies!

 

This is exactly what I was thinking of-Bed,Bath and Beyond sells them too. If I had a flagstone kitchen I think I might have one at the sink, range, and work area (or where ever I stood for a long period of time).

 

I think flagstone is classic. Lots of old homes in Europe have them or did until "modern" renovations. Now folks are putting them back when they can.

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