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Well, I am just full of questions this week. :tongue_smilie:

 

I was searching through different colleges on collegeboard.com and looking at their requirements. Many said, "High School diploma required, GED accepted". That was just in the general "High School Preparation" area. Then, below that is the "Home-Schooled Students" area where it lists the different requirements that Home-schooled students have separate from others.

 

Some colleges listed in the "Home-Schooled Students" area: "State high school equivalency certificate".

 

Only one college I am interested in listed that, the others didn't have that as a special part for Home-Schooled Students.

 

My question is, since in the "High School Preparation" area it states I need a High School Diploma or GED, will our homemade Diploma work? I know these colleges accept Home-Schooled Students, I am just curious and a bit confused.

 

Also, what do they mean by: "Statement describing home school structure and mission"?

 

Thanks.

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If you already know which colleges you want to apply to you need to check with that school. First check their website. Most will tell you what a homeschooler needs to do, if not call the school. I have found that these kinds of sites are not reliable and have erroneous information on them. A big mantra around her is check with the school and it's one most of us have found to be very true.

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Almost all colleges accept home school diplomas. Some colleges with a common application want a home school supplement. That document does include a home school philosophy section and a grading section among others. You would have one of your parents write that. They would also fill out the counselor section and include a counselor's letter of recommendation. Head on over to the College section of this board as the year goes on and see how many this year or how many last year got into schools with just their home school diploma. The acceptance list goes from the most selective colleges to local, open admission schools.

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Stephanie,

 

I would agree with Alyce that the guidelines you find on general websites (e.g. collegeboard) can be helpful, but the best way to find out what a specific college will want from a homeschooler is to check the college's own website and to give their admissions office a phone call.

 

If there are college fairs in your area (most fairs in my area seem to be in the spring), that's another good place to talk to representatives from different colleges. I found out about a rather large college fair (by doing some web surfing) at a local private high school that was open to the general public.

All the college reps we approached there were happy to talk about their requirements for homeschooled applicants. We were also able to find out about scholarships they had available and how to apply for them.

 

Best wishes,

Brenda

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I also found that sometimes admission counselors don't even know what is posted on their own websites. The university that my 11th grader wants to attend states on their website "accredited diploma or GED required." I spoke with 3 different admission officers at their open house last weekend and all of them stated that they accept a homeschool transcript as is.

 

I would contact the admissions depts directly and speak to someone about how they treat homeschoolers.

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If you already know which colleges you want to apply to you need to check with that school. First check their website. Most will tell you what a homeschooler needs to do, if not call the school. I have found that these kinds of sites are not reliable and have erroneous information on them. A big mantra around her is check with the school and it's one most of us have found to be very true.

 

:iagree:

 

Most colleges are moving toward requiring less hoops from homeschoolers, not more. However, they also tend to put a BIG emphasis on standardized tests like the SAT/ACT or AP, cc courses, etc. I've yet to come across a college that won't accept a home diploma, but there may still be some out there. Check with the school itself.

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To most colleges your diploma is a high school diploma. THe GED requirement is for students not finishing any high school work. But I agree - ask at each college. I actually never asked about our transcript or diploma - and ds was accepted at legitimate at colleges. I also wouldn't let ds take a GED - looks bad like he dropped out or something. Bottom line, most colleges still like homeschoolers, But I would ask.

 

Barb

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Again, check w/the school. Our experience was that not one of the 5 schools dd#1 applied to blinked at her mom transcript, but she did have 60+ hrs of cc and 30+ ACT score to make me a minor player.

 

I've looked at U of Florida's site & they require SAT IIs for anyone graduating from a non-accredited hs

(many private schools would be in that catagory) unless you have DE credit to "verify" the grade. Since you're in Mass.--which is a more restrictive Hmscl State--no telling what they'll require.

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As a homeschooler from Massachusetts, I would plan on sending colleges:

 

Your old public high school transcript

Each year's letter from your school system saying that your homeschooling plan for that year is approved

Three recommendations (preferably academic class teachers and non-family)

Your homeschool transcript (you can make this up using Word or something)

SAT or ACT scores

Three AP or SAT2 scores (you might not need this, but some colleges want to see this from homeschoolers)

A school profile (a page of information about your homeschool, how you assign credits, your grading policy, and stuff like that)

A councelor's recommendation (a page about you yourself, what makes you unique, what you will contribute to the college you are applying to, and whatever proof you can offer that you are capable of doing college level work)

An essay

 

Depending on the program, you may need medical information or a passport, and you will need to send colleges all sorts of information about your finacial status.

 

Your transcripts, between them, probably should show 4 years of math and English, and 3 or 4 years of foreign language, social studies, and lab science.

 

You might be able to get away with only the transcripts and whatever test scores you have, at a minimum, but if you plan on the above, you won't be scrambling at the end to try to take an extra test or come up with a recommendation.

 

HTH

-Nan

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As a homeschooler from Massachusetts, I would plan on sending colleges:

 

Your old public high school transcript

Each year's letter from your school system saying that your homeschooling plan for that year is approved

Three recommendations (preferably academic class teachers and non-family)

Your homeschool transcript (you can make this up using Word or something)

SAT or ACT scores

Three AP or SAT2 scores (you might not need this, but some colleges want to see this from homeschoolers)

A school profile (a page of information about your homeschool, how you assign credits, your grading policy, and stuff like that)

A councelor's recommendation (a page about you yourself, what makes you unique, what you will contribute to the college you are applying to, and whatever proof you can offer that you are capable of doing college level work)

An essay

 

Depending on the program, you may need medical information or a passport, and you will need to send colleges all sorts of information about your finacial status.

 

Your transcripts, between them, probably should show 4 years of math and English, and 3 or 4 years of foreign language, social studies, and lab science.

 

You might be able to get away with only the transcripts and whatever test scores you have, at a minimum, but if you plan on the above, you won't be scrambling at the end to try to take an extra test or come up with a recommendation.

 

HTH

-Nan

 

Thank you for this info!

 

So, I should send the PS transcript and my homeschool separately? I was just going to put my classes from PS on one transcript with the homeschool one and put a * next to them and say PS on the bottom.

 

Also, I may not be able to afford SAT II and AP tests, but should an SAT and ACT be enough?

 

Thanks.

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It will depend on the school. Some want SAT2s or APs from homeschoolers and some don't. Colleges want proof that the grades you have from homeschooling are a reflection of your academic abilities. It may be that your ps transcript and SATs or ACTs do that. You probably won't need both an SAT and an ACT. Perhaps you can take the money from one of those and put it towards an SAT2 something? As people here keep saying, the colleges are all different, and they all are changing. What is true this year might not be true next year. My list is a probably-will-be-ok-for-most-colleges list, not a this-will-absolutely-work list, nor a less-than-this-won't-work list.

 

As for your public school transcript - there is no reason you can't put all your classes, both home ones and school ones, on your homeschool transcript. I probably would if I were you. I just know that when my son, with his mix of community college classes and home classes, applied, there were directions on the application saying that they wanted a transcript sent to them from any other place the student had taken classes. My son sent the transcript I made him and wrote to the community college asking them to send his cc transcript as well, even though those classes appeared on his homeschool transcript. The same thing is true of SAT scores: the college wanted the scores sent by the college board company, even though I listed the scores on the transcript. Think "how could somebody cheat and misrepresent themselves" and you'll get the idea. Recommendations are sometimes a problem, too. Some colleges want to receive them directly from the recommender rather than have them sent by you. There are whole threads here about that.

 

At this point in your education, I think the main things for you to do are to keep an eye on whatever the minimum course requirements are (I have yet to hear of a non-community college that would accept less than 4 years of English, for example), keep track of what you do, books read, etc., keep your eye out for people who will write letters of recommendation when the time comes and keep in touch with them, make sure you know when you need to do which national tests, apply properly each year to homeschool, make sure you have a piece of paper from the school system saying that your plan is approved, and carefully file that paper away for later.

 

OK?

-Nan

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There is an article in The Home School Court Report from HSLDA that discusses this very issue in the state of Massachusetts. I tried scanning and adding it as an attachment but it was not readable, so I typed it out for you.

 

From HSLDA's The Home School Court Report Vol. XXVI, No. 3 May/June 2010

 

MASSACHUSETTS

 

HSLDA letter aids college admissions process

By Michael P. Donnelly

 

A Home School Legal Defense Association member family contact HSLDA to help unravel some difficulties their daughter was experiencing with the application process of Westfield State College in Massachusetts. After applying for admission, she was informed that college policy required all home school students to submit GED test scores in addition to SAT scores and a high school transcript.

After learning of this discriminatory requirement, HSLDA Staff Attorney Michael Donnelly wrote the director of admissions urging Westfield to accept our member’s daughter and revise their policy to reflect state and federal provisions, which implicitly state that home school graduates are not required to take the GED.

Westfield quickly notified our member they were accepting their daughter and thanked HSLDA for its timely assistance. The college also informed our member that they would be using the letter from HSLDA as a reference when considering future applications from home school students.

HSLDA was pleased to see Westfield’s positive response. We seek to advocate on behalf of our members when they are unnecessarily discriminated against by college admissions requirements.

 

I hope this is helpful to you. Good luck!

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You probably won't need both an SAT and an ACT. Perhaps you can take the money from one of those and put it towards an SAT2 something?

 

Yes, But with my ds - he took SAT then the ACT. He did so much better on the ACT! Glad we took it because it was his ACT score that earned him a scholarship!

Barb

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