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How do you "write up" volunteer hours?


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I'm sure this has been asked somewhere, I just couldn't find it...

 

My dd and one of her friends worked on a huge community project (building a playground for kids with autism and other "problems"). I couldn't even tell you how many hours the two of them (and the moms, who were the drivers ;)) put in with meetings, planning, giving speeches to request help from service organizations, churches, etc. They even wrote a grant, under the guidance of the lady they worked with at the mental health facility.

 

Anyway, she also volunteers at the Humane Society, and, now the the playground project is done, she's already planning her next venture. So, how do you all put volunteering that your children do? Do you hand it in with transcripts, etc.?

 

My oldest went to a University from our church that didn't require that, my middle one gone on mission trips (does that "count?"), and dd is doing more community service. I am not sure evern where to begin, or if it's even needed? I just hear people saying it's good for possible grants/scholarships when they see how much volunteering/community service the kids have done.

 

So, really, I guess I'm curious as to if and/or how you all go about this???

 

Hopefully this is clearer than mud! :001_smile:

Edited by Brindee
I spelled mud-- mid! ??? Fixed it. ;)
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At this point, you want to keep a record of how many hours your daughter has volunteered. Many college applications (including the Common Application) will have a place where this information can be filled in. Many scholarship applications will also require this information.

 

Also, gather any supporting evidence. Sometimes organizations keep track of volunteer hours. Did this project generate a newspaper article? Would someone at the Humane Society be willing to write a letter of recommendation for your daughter? Is this your 13 year old? In that case, just ask that the letter of recommendation be addressed "to whom it may concern." You will have it on hand if you later choose to submit it to a college or organization. (Given that she is years from college, you may not choose to submit it later. I used some snippets from older letters of recommendation in the counselor letter of recommendation I wrote for my daughter's college applications.)

 

Regards,

Kareni

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Yeah, the biggest thing right now is to keep track of the hours. Organizations that usually require volunteers will often already have on hand volunteer log-in sheets that the coordinator can sign off on. If not, make sure you take one so someone in charge can validate the hours. You definitely want to make sure she gets credit for those hours because they are handy for scholarships.

 

I googled "volunteer hour log sheet" and got a lot of hits.

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You definitely want to make sure she gets credit for those hours because they are handy for scholarships.
Exactly, that's what I've heard and why I'm asking. Good to know!

 

At this point, you want to keep a record of how many hours your daughter has volunteered. Many college applications (including the Common Application) will have a place where this information can be filled in. Many scholarship applications will also require this information.

 

Also, gather any supporting evidence. Sometimes organizations keep track of volunteer hours. Did this project generate a newspaper article? Would someone at the Humane Society be willing to write a letter of recommendation for your daughter? Is this your 13 year old? In that case, just ask that the letter of recommendation be addressed "to whom it may concern." You will have it on hand if you later choose to submit it to a college or organization. (Given that she is years from college, you may not choose to submit it later. I used some snippets from older letters of recommendation in the counselor letter of recommendation I wrote for my daughter's college applications.)

 

 

It IS for my 13yo, since she's in high school now, so I thought I should start keeping track, right??? There were articles in the paper, but would "they" want to see those, or is it just proof in case they ask for it?

 

Thank you both for your answers!

 

I googled "volunteer hour log sheet" and got a lot of hits.

Thank you, I will go try that.

Edited by Brindee
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I listed each organization they volunteered for and added the number of hours they contributed to them. I listed them under extracurricular activities. As to when to start counting, you can't count until she start's 9th grade, but you can go ahead and get a letter of recommendation now if you think it's something she'll no longer do like the school ground project. That way when it comes time to apply you'll have several letters of recommendation and you can either send them all in or if your college only wants 2 you can pick the 2 that makes your Dd look in the best light.

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We kept track of hours starting in mid-June of the summer BEFORE the student enters 9th grade.

 

The colleges often want to know what the student does each summer, and the forms have room for four summers, so I figure that they must count the summer before 9th grade as part of high school.

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I keep track of hours worked, name of organization, contact person, and job description. We also get a letter on the organization's letterhead confirming how many hours my dc put in for that particular project or that year.

 

HTH,

Lisa

 

The letterhead letter is all important for our state's Bright Futures scholarship. For the top $$, 75 volunteer hours are required.

 

Any log you do should also have a spot for supervisor's initials also.

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So, is it not enough to just note dates, hrs. and places on their transcripts/portfolios? Do we need to make sure every form is signed? Exactly why do we need volunteer hrs.?
From what I've heard, there are some scholarships available that are based in part on hours volunteered. Hours spent volunteering shows compassion, hard work, caring and giving. Good grades show scholarship abilities. Those together make for a well-rounded young person! And showing them over time, shows consistency and maybe trustworthiness.

 

I know I'm not using all the "right" words, but that's the basic idea for why I'm looking this direction. :D

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