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s/of gluten-free thread....what DO you eat when you eat gluten-free?


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I'm supposed to be going gluten/dairy/sugar/yeast free. Though I don't find going dairy free that hard (I can have goat substitutes), gluten free just kills me. What the heck are people substituting for gluten? I get that it's a lot of non-processed foods, but it just seems to kills me...I miss those yummy carbohydrates (in a way...yes I feel better, but they call my name!).

 

My friend's two children are celiac, so she's buying a lot of gluten-free substitutes at the store. Not only is it expensive, technically I still can't have it because it's got one or a combination of other ingredients in it that I still can't have.

 

So really, am I just to be eating a lot of fruit, veggies, rice, and meat? Just a bland diet? It seems quite bland to me!

 

If I can get enough suggestions with food ideas to entice me, then I can keep it going...and I need to. I'm absolutely exhausted an need to lose 20lbs minimum.

 

Thanks!

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yep

 

 

 

and some legumes. Mine are allergic to dairy and egg otherwise we'd do that too.

 

Technically I can't have nightshade veggies and legumes, either. LOL So basically I'm eating sawdust. Ok, fruit, veggies, meat, eggs (YAY!!!!), rice, and sawdust. :)

 

So I guess I need to be thankful I can eat eggs, when I shouldn't be eating legumes...easier to work with!

 

Sigh...still...I have a hard time getting around the mindset that I'm LIMITING myself from the crap (thus being punished), when it's actually a GOOD thing...good to my body, etc, to be eating healthy. Why is this mindset so hard to break???

 

(For example, if my whole family goes gluten-free, I "get" that I can buy substitutes for "yummy" treats like cookies and muffins, but in my mind I feel that it's every child/mother's right to be able to bake these treats with their children, kwim?...and by not baking and having these things, I'm taking something away from my kids.)

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Well, that is a lot of my diet, but no one would ever call it bland. There are such a variety of veggies, meats, spices out there- especially when you look to ethnic cuisine. Think about it grains really are the bland foods- how many grains do you eat plain? They don't really have flavor. Yes, you do feel better off the grains and the carbs, seriously.

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Aww...I'm sorry you feel like you can't make the nice things you want to give your family. Take a look at 'You Won't believe It's Gluten Free'. I buy brown rice flour from Amazon (!) and I bake for all my kids. They love almost everything I've made.

 

It is more expensive, but certainly not as bad as paying for processed GF stuff.

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Reading your post, you can bake goods w/ your kids. Going gf doesn't mean you have to buy processed store made gf foods. My kids and I cook together all the time. All kinds of food, sometimes sweet treats- like once a week we make homemade coco milk icecream.

 

Really it is no boring. Check out http://www.marksdailyapple.com for some meal ideas, lots of great recipes. Also, http://www.elanaspantry.com.

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When you go through a diet change like this you have to learn to cook again. At first it's very plain because you focus on the limitations. You need to examine what you can eat and start looking a cuisines that accommodate your diet. True Vietnamese cooking is gluten and dairy free. Some Indian meals could be acceptable. If you are interested in cooking go to the library and get a bunch of books on different cuisines, plus check books on the specific carbohydrate diet and autism related cookbooks. I think the foreign cuisines will be especially helpful because they will get you thinking about spices and herbs which can really dress up your food. You could challenge yourself to trying a new recipe a week. You may get lucky and find something your kids rave about that you never would have put on the dinner table for the family before.

 

Can you eat quinoa? It might a good grain substitute for you to try.

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Well, that is a lot of my diet, but no one would ever call it bland. There are such a variety of veggies, meats, spices out there- especially when you look to ethnic cuisine. Think about it grains really are the bland foods- how many grains do you eat plain? They don't really have flavor. Yes, you do feel better off the grains and the carbs, seriously.

 

So, Ladies, what are you eating for breakfast and lunch, especially? We either have cereal and milk (out, now), toast (out), muffins (out) or eggs...and we can't have eggs every day...we'd like some variety?

 

And lunch...sandwiches are our mainstay...now what?

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but in my mind I feel that it's every child/mother's right to be able to bake these treats with their children, kwim?...and by not baking and having these things, I'm taking something away from my kids.)
This is something I had to let go of early on due to the dairy and egg allergy. I know exactly how you feel because I've been there. We have just created different family traditions.
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Check out Bette Hagman's books. (The Gluten Free Gourmet series) She has some great recipes. It does take a lot of trial and error, but I make wonderful baked goods from scratch. If you cook from scratch, you can use whatever gf flours work for your diet. My fave chocolate cake is a regular recipe one that I subbed in a gf flour combo. I just made gf crumpets from Bette Hagman's "The Gluten Free Gourmet Bakes Bread". It took about a month of baking and playing around with different recpies until I got comfortable with using gf flours. We are a gluten free household and don't miss out on anything.:001_smile: If you want my gf flour blend, I will post it. Also, Bette Hagman's books have several different flour blends. You can buy gf flours in bulk or in small amounts and mix them yourself. That is what I do.

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breakfast you can have cereal if you wish. Rice chex is gluten free and you can use rice, soy, or almond milk. I eat a poached egg and a piece of fruit.

 

Lunch: you can have leftovers from the yummy recipe you learned the night before. You can have salad. You can eat chicken/tuna salad or peanut butter with celery, cucumber or apple slices. Take whatever filling other people are slamming between bread and roll it in lettuce leaves. Think about trying different things with corn tortillas.

 

Try something different a few times a week and you'll start to build a repetoire of food you like and can eat.

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So, Ladies, what are you eating for breakfast and lunch, especially? We either have cereal and milk (out, now), toast (out), muffins (out) or eggs...and we can't have eggs every day...we'd like some variety?

 

And lunch...sandwiches are our mainstay...now what?

 

We eat gluten free oatmeal (Bob's red mill on amazon.com is cheapest), homemade gf English muffins (bake ahead and freeze them), or pb and j sandwiches on gf bread. There is a gf sub for just about every gluten containing item. Sometimes it is much cheaper to bake them yourself. There are also gf waffles at many grocery stores (our Kroger carries them). Gf pancakes are good - I like Pamela's mixes for bread and pancakes. You can make gf muffins and freeze them for use later. We've been gluten free here for almost three years and everyone is well nourished.:D

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So, Ladies, what are you eating for breakfast and lunch, especially? We either have cereal and milk (out, now), toast (out), muffins (out) or eggs...and we can't have eggs every day...we'd like some variety?

 

And lunch...sandwiches are our mainstay...now what?

 

Breakfast has been the hardest for me once we went dairy free (already GF for 3 years). Can you have certified gluten-free oats? (Bob's Red Mill makes them.) We tend to have oatmeal a couple times a week. We do eat a lot of eggs (usually can go through 4 dozen in a week). My middle son and youngest son like coconut milk yogurt, but it is costly so I don't buy it often. I'll also use almond flour (the finer it is ground the better) to make pancakes:

 

1 cup almond meal flour

3-4 eggs

2 tablespoons of honey

splash of GF vanilla extract

cinnamon

 

Sometimes I'll add a ripe banana. Cook them in coconut oil (or another oil/butter substitute) and serve them up. My oldest doesn't like them as much so sometimes I'll cut some of the almond meal flour with a GF/DF pancake mix. I'll also add coconut flour sometimes, but then I need to add more liquid as it absorbs liquid like crazy.

 

Can you do nut butters? We do GF toast (I do spluge and buy GF bread - Udi's is really good, GF cookies (or cookie mixes), and GF pretzels) with nut butters and jelly. I also make coconut milk smoothies, which are loaded with tons of healthy fat.

 

For lunches I make chicken tenders (sometimes I'll dredge them through rice flour with seasonings), rice pasta and sauce (though are tomatoes out because they are part of the nightshade family?), soup, etc. We can do eggs and legumes, so we do include both in our recipes, so I'm guessing black bean soup and chili might be out. :( Oh, can you do corn? We either buy corn tortillas or I make them and use them for tacos (dh will grill halibut or cod for fish tacos).

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When you go through a diet change like this you have to learn to cook again. At first it's very plain because you focus on the limitations. You need to examine what you can eat and start looking a cuisines that accommodate your diet. True Vietnamese cooking is gluten and dairy free. Some Indian meals could be acceptable. If you are interested in cooking go to the library and get a bunch of books on different cuisines, plus check books on the specific carbohydrate diet and autism related cookbooks. I think the foreign cuisines will be especially helpful because they will get you thinking about spices and herbs which can really dress up your food. You could challenge yourself to trying a new recipe a week. You may get lucky and find something your kids rave about that you never would have put on the dinner table for the family before.

 

Can you eat quinoa? It might a good grain substitute for you to try.

 

Sigh. As it is I'm not a great cook. I think this is something I'm really going to have to tackle. I'm sure if I can be feeling better with more energy (with eating gluten-free...and iron issues, so hopefully that'll be resolved soon), then the ball will continue rolling and I'll be encouraged to do this!

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I do eat a lot of eggs for bfast, veggies, meats. I don't know in the morning I am usually not in the mood to be exciting. I do feed the kids gf oats but on a sugarfree diet as well I am guessing you are not eating those. You can make pancakes out of all kinds of things- there are banana pancakes, apple pancakes, nutmeal pancakes- all are good- obviously maple syrup is out but if you can have fruit you can cook it down and use it as a topping.

 

When you say sugar-free, how sugar free do you mean? Really no-sugar and you cannot eat the gf replacement baked goods either. Or are you only eating natural sugars? Is there any restriction on carb level?

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To the OP: Have you looked at Living Without Magazine? I don't have the web-site handy, but if you Google it, you should find it. They have lots of great GF recipes and many have list variations for people like yourself who cannot have other things as well.

 

It also may help you to make a list of all the things you CAN have. Just to help you have a better mindset, KWIM? Focus on what you can have and it starts to look easier.

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You can do this. I guess I was lucky because I already liked cooking and baking before having to take the family gf, so changing what I did was hard because had ingrained patterns in my cooking, but changing was not so hard because I am comfortable and often enjoy cooking.

 

Take it slow. Pick up a few cookbooks from the library, find one recipe to try. Try only one or two a month. At the same time you may have to be finding ingredients you've never used, so going for one new recipe a month may be a good goal to start. Over time you will begin to think of yourself as quite a capable cook.

 

When we went gf it took me a year to develop a confidence with what I was doing.

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I do eat a lot of eggs for bfast, veggies, meats. I don't know in the morning I am usually not in the mood to be exciting. I do feed the kids gf oats but on a sugarfree diet as well I am guessing you are not eating those. You can make pancakes out of all kinds of things- there are banana pancakes, apple pancakes, nutmeal pancakes- all are good- obviously maple syrup is out but if you can have fruit you can cook it down and use it as a topping.

 

When you say sugar-free, how sugar free do you mean? Really no-sugar and you cannot eat the gf replacement baked goods either. Or are you only eating natural sugars? Is there any restriction on carb level?

 

When I eat sugar free, it means everything, including maple syrup, agave, honey, etc...the only sugar I'd eat is Stevia. But I find it extremely limiting...

 

I could do gf pancakes for the kids, but MY particular gf pancake recipe which is sugar and dairy free is quite expensive to make! (what with the rice flour and all the goat yogurt that's in it....)

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To the OP: Have you looked at Living Without Magazine? I don't have the web-site handy, but if you Google it, you should find it. They have lots of great GF recipes and many have list variations for people like yourself who cannot have other things as well.

 

It also may help you to make a list of all the things you CAN have. Just to help you have a better mindset, KWIM? Focus on what you can have and it starts to look easier.

 

I've never heard of this mag...I will look it up. Thanks!

 

To the other posters that I have no personally responded to....THANK YOU for your words of encouragement and advice...I'm feeling like the mountain isn't as big as I once thought.

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Breakfast: Fried potatoes & onions (my dh's fav even b/f going gf) Mostly we eat ham, sausage, or bacon with potatoes or rice and some fruit and veggie. We also throw in corn masa & rice flour pancakes but they require milk. You could possibly sub soy for milk.

 

Other carbs: corn bread made with soy milk or some other milk sub.)

Look up a recipe for pancit. It is a rice noodle dish that is yummy.

 

I have used spaghetti squash to make spaghetti. Yes it is a veggie and still is different that regular spaghetti, but it is good.

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Sounds like the diet I am on.

 

I found the first three weeks very difficult. It got much better and much easier though.

 

I do spend a lot more time cooking now, though I am finding that the freshly cooked food is so flavorful now that I don't mind the cooking.

 

Make sure you eat enough healthy fats--it'll be more than you think you should have. Don't worry, you'll lose a ton of weight, but you'll feel waaaaay better with more fat in the diet. Try avocados and nuts.

 

For breakfast I usually have eggs with pico de gallo (fresh salsa that is vinegar and sugar free). I might also have a sliced cucumber with this.

 

For lunch, I normally fry up a pork chop or steak or some chicken or shrimp. It doesn't take that long. Many days I carmelize an onion (takes about half an hour, most of which is just leaving the onion cooking on low with the occasional stir). With that I have as many vegetables as I want.

 

Dinner is usually more meat with vegetables.

 

I am at the stage where I can have plain yoghurt, so I eat that daily. I am also now allowed to have wild rice--it's expensive but very tasty. I can have legumes 1-2 times per week in small amounts (half a cup) so I supplement some meals with that as well.

 

You will find that your taste buds will change. Within about a month of this diet, fresh food will taste unbelievably flavorful, and your appetite will decrease on its own. For example, raw cabbage tastes really sweet to me now, whereas before the diet I considered it kind of bland. I started eating it because I was desperate, and now I eat it because it tastes really good to me.

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We're gluten free (ds and I are both celiac) and he used to be dairy, egg, and meat free as well - and hated legumes with a passion. Oy!

 

He's now back on meat and eggs (YAY) and is able to handle dairy as long as it's in something (and not just a straight dairy product). One cookbook I suggest is Cooking for Isaiah by Silvana Nardone - she's the founding editor of Rachael Ray's mag, and her son is gf/df as well. Only a few of the recipes have yeast, and there may be something you can sub for the sugar in the baked goods (agave maybe, or a fruit? I'm assuming it's refined sugar you can't have?). Her recipes are amazing, and extremely easy to work with.

 

What do we eat? Well...when we were dx'd two year ago, not a whole heck of a lot. :glare: Everything we ate came from Whole Foods and cost a bundle. Since then, I've learned how to cook and bake gf and life has gotten a lot better. Most of what we eat comes from Walmart and Sams - yes, we eat a lot of natural foods, but we also eat Chex (everything but the Wheat and Multi-Grain varieties are gf), Ore Ida fries (when we don't feel like making them from actual potatoes), Progresso soups (several are gf), Mission corn tortillas (can also make chips out of them - 5 minutes in the oven with a little Pam spray), Udi bread (yum!), and lots of other stuff.

 

The Cooking for Isaiah book goes into a lot of great info about how to cook, bake, and really live (rather than just survive) gf/df. You can also check out sites like Gluten Freeville, or any number of gf or gf/df cooking blogs (just google "gluten free cooking blog").

 

Hope that helps!

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I eat meat, eggs, poultry, pork, fish, nuts, coconut (coconut milk), vegetables, nuts, dark chocolate, and some fruit. Once in a blue moon I have some GF ice cream. In my cooking I use spices, herbs, and condiments like mustard, ketchup, mayo, tamari soy sauce (which is GF), BBQ sauce, etc. My kids also eat potatoes (5 Guys fries are safe), rice (cooked rice, rice milk, rice cakes, rice tortillas), and corn (tortillas, taco shells, popcorn etc.).

 

I don't seek out substitutes for gluteny stuff for myself, but once in a while I make GF pancakes for my kids, and my kids sometimes eat GF bread. They eat Lara bars, and they also like the GF preztels called Sticks & Twigs.

 

There's nothing boring or bland about it, but it does require a paradigm shift. ;)

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I have a VitaMix blender and grind rice, millet, quinoa, chick peas, etc into flour and use it for baking. We still have pizza and sandwiches once a week. I make cookies, cakes, pies, etc., but I substitute gluten free flour for regular. Some recipes it can be a straight substitution, but others need some tweaking.

 

I have found gluten free blogs to be the best source of recipes. I love that I can read comments and make changes based on them. We are casein, gluten and soy free. Soy is the last item we dropped, and it has been the hardest for me to work with. It is in so many of the things we use.

 

The key for me is grinding my own flours and making my own mixes. I can't even imagine trying to afford to bake for all 7 of us using store bought mixes. The VitaMix was a huge expense, but I save more than saved what I spent on it. I use it daily.

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You will find that your taste buds will change. Within about a month of this diet, fresh food will taste unbelievably flavorful, and your appetite will decrease on its own. For example, raw cabbage tastes really sweet to me now, whereas before the diet I considered it kind of bland. I started eating it because I was desperate, and now I eat it because it tastes really good to me.

 

This is so true! Before going dairy free, I couldn't imagine not having sour cream and cheese on my tacos, or creamy dressing on my salads. (It was so much easier for me to go GF and cut all artificial ingredients - dairy was tough for me). But now a plain salad tastes so good, I have learned to enjoy some things that I never liked, and I agree, raw cabbage tastes really good.

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I had heard wonderful things about the book Wheat-Free Recipes and Menus, and then my dh found it at the Goodwill for $2! I am planning on baking my way through it this year and even bake some items to sell at the farmers' market next year. She has some great non-wheat flour baking mixes.

 

Prior to finding this book, my dh had just been experimenting with different flours (rice, corn, oatmeal - he's gluten intolerant, so he decided to risk oatmeal, but many people on gluten-free diets can't; he's also dairy-free). His pancakes just using a combination of white and brown rice flours substituted for the wheat flour plus a tablespoon of xantham gum were just yummy!

 

I have also heard good things about Gluten-Free Baking Classics, but I haven't tried any of the recipes myself.

 

Can you eat honey? I have had great success substituting honey for sugar in recipes.

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Sweet potatoes with coconut oil is yummy, fairly inexpensive, and easy.

 

Teff flour is a nice flour for cookies or pancakes. Use spectrum organic shortening if you are making something light or sweet, olive oil for a tortilla like thing with meat.

 

Millet is also OK. The flour makes a decent pancake (with water and gluten free baking soda) and the hulled millet is decent plain if topped with a gravy from meat droppings made from millet flour and water.

 

You can also bake spaghetti squash and then fry the "noodles" in olive oil for a cheap fairly yummy starch.

 

I also make a whole chicken on top of Jicama, carrots, and celery. Bake the whole thing in the oven for a few hours, top it with olive oil and either 1. Salt, pepper, garlic, paprika 2. Italian spices 3. Salt, pepper, chicken type seasonings, sage

 

(I can actually eat gluten and wheat, but I am allergic to a ton of stuff and many of the things I can eat are gluten free.)

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My son is gluten free and the main specialty items I buy are one loaf of Udi's bread (this is the only gf bread I have found that you don't have to toast) each week and once in a while a bag of Tinkyada pasta.

 

A typical breakfast would be a couple of slices of gluten free bread with earth balance dairy-free butter, eggs, and bacon. Sometimes I buy him Chex cereal since it's gluten free or a bag of Kinnikinnick gf pancake mix.

 

Dinner is usually meat, a vegetable and either potatoes or rice. Occasionally I will make The Cravings Place cornbread mix, but that's pretty rare. Zatarain's wild rice is gluten free and so is Mahatma's yellow rice, so that offers some variety. But, yes, we do have either rice or potatoes 99% of the time. With the potatoes, I rotate between baked, oven roasted, mashed, grilling the little white potatoes in from a can or french fries. I grill probably 5 nights a week, even in the winter because everything tastes so much better that way. Another favorite is a rotisserie chicken from Giant or Costco. Crockpot and stir fry recipes can also be good.

 

Lunch is usually leftovers. If you want pizza you can buy a box of Kinnikinnick pizza crusts and then add your own sauce and goat cheese and whatever other toppings you want. This is the cheapest way I have found to make gf pizza. We don't really have it very often because both of my kids are sensitive to dairy. I recently bought steak-ums for the first time and made my son a sandwich on his gluten free bread with those and he loved it.

 

A lot of gluten free mixes can be bought in bulk on Amazon and shipping is usually free.

 

I live in a very expensive area and I spend $100 a week on groceries, so we don't have tons of gluten free mixes, but I work on buying a case of something here and there from Amazon and it will go a long way. The bread, in my opinion is a necessity.

 

Lisa

Edited by LisaTheresa
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The chicken over Jicama thing sounds fantastic. I think I'll make that this week. Thanks!

 

You are welcome! I also used to add potatoes when I could eat those. And, my children liked it! (Most of my allergy food, no one else would eat, and I don't blame them!! My son, however, likes both oat flour pancakes and millet flour pancakes. In fact, he likes oat flour pancakes better than regular pancakes.)

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So, Ladies, what are you eating for breakfast and lunch, especially? We either have cereal and milk (out, now), toast (out), muffins (out) or eggs...and we can't have eggs every day...we'd like some variety?

 

And lunch...sandwiches are our mainstay...now what?

 

Breakfast:

oatmeal and fruit

eggs several different ways

gluten free cereals (rice crispy-like, cornflake-like, cheerio-like with goat milk)

gluten free waffles

GF/Dairy free baking (mostly muffins-pumpkin, banana, etc.)

 

Lunch:

still sandwiches on GF wraps or GF bread

hummus with veggies for dipping (but what about using tahini or baba ganouj if you can't have chickpeas in the hummus?)

meatloaf

baked fish

soups

tacos/tortillas

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Here's a sampling of meals we've had lately:

 

Fish in parchment paper, served with with asparagus and potatoes. The potatoes were thin-sliced, then layered with with a bit of olive oil, salt and onion and baked in a cast iron skillet until the edges are crunchy.

 

Pizza -- I made the crust, we added gfcf pizza sauce, Daiya dairy-free cheese, Applegate farms gfcf pepperoni and veggies.

 

Chicken Panang curry over rice, with cucumbers and salad.

 

Baked chicken tenders (Bell and Evans has a GFCF version) over Quinoa spaghetti and gfcf spaghetti sauce. Melt gfcf mozarella on the chicken, and it's a lot like Chicken "Parm."

 

Chicken fried rice made with GFCF soy sauce, eggs, peas, carrots, mushrooms, chicken and nitrite-free bacon.

 

GFCF calzones (Homemade)

 

As for baking with your kids, I make all of the following gfcf sweets at home. (Many of the recipes have been posted on the forum in the past couple of years.)

 

Chocolate chip cookies

Chocolate cupcakes with mock cream cheese icing

Gingerbread

Orange cupcakes

Birthday cake

Brownies

Pumpkin pie (use crushed GFCF Mi-Del ginger snaps with a bit of melted Earth Balance for the crust)

Cinnamon rolls

GFCF "Reese's" cups (these are much better than the real thing!)

Peppermint bark

Fudge (chocolate and peanut butter)

"Potato candy" spirals

 

and more...

 

It's entirely normal to struggle while you're wrapping your head around the changes. Once you start to feel comfortable making gfcf foods, though, you may find (as we did) that the over processed, chemical-laden stuff you used to eat tastes bad. "Regular" pasta tastes gummy to me now, for example.

 

In addition, most "junk food" really bugs me now. Anything with hydrogenated fats leaves a film on the roof of my mouth, and it's really nasty to me now that I'm used to homemade goodies!

 

You'll get there, I promise. My son has been eating a diet without gluten, casein, corn syrup, artificial colors, artificial preservatives or MSG for five years. The first six months were hard, but it's much easier now.

 

 

Lisa

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Breakfast:

 

GFCF waffles

Eggs and sausage or bacon

Leftovers from dinner

pancakes

homemade gfcf banana, chocolate or blueberry muffins

gfcf rolls with honey or jelly

apples and peanut butter

fruit

 

Lunch or dinner:

 

gfcf calzones (I make a batch and freeze them)

PB&J or other sandwich on gfcf bread

Baked chicken tenders and "fries"

taco salad (no tortilla bowl) or taco/rice bowl (rice, beans, spiced chicken or beef, tomatoes, guacamole, sliced olives, etc.)

meatloaf (use ground flax seeds or crushed gfcf pretzels in lieu of bread crumbs) and mashed potatoes (use "Earth Balance" dairy-free spread)

homemade sushi (rice, seaweed, veggies, shrimp or real crab -artificial has wheat) or sushi bowls (sushi rice, cooked shrimp, diced cucumber, avocado, carrot, sesame seeds, and gfcf Thai chili sauce) or rice noodle bowls (similar ingredients to the rice bowl)

chili (homemade)

baked potato soup (use coconut milk and chicken or veggie stock instead of cow's milk)

"pasta fajouli" soup (cooked ground beef beef, diced tomatoes, kidney beans, white beans, V-8 juice, veggie stock, 1 T vinegar, oregano, salt, pepper, gfcf elbow noodles)

Indian "butter" chicken

spaghetti

 

That's all that comes to the top of my head right now. So many things can be altered to be appropriate for a gfcf diet and still taste good. It's really all about getting your focus shifted -- which just takes time.

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