Jump to content

Menu

Artistic/creative gifted curriculum


treestarfae
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have many generations of gifted artists in my family. My youngest has sprung up the same. I'm having trouble getting d/c to not reform every thing we are studying like vocab into a song or drawing and writing own books. I have a first grader here and I need to get the basics in without distractions ha-ha. Is this possible?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What I do with my DD, who will spend HOURS illustrating everything, is to tell her that we're going to do the school part first, and then she can do the drawing part. So, if she wants to illustrate her copywork that's great-but she can do it after we finish the core for the day. And usually, she does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not sure if this will help, because it involves more work, but this is what we do.

 

After we learn something in LA, lets say nouns. I have a sketch book that she uses and will write "common nouns" at the top of the page, then draw pictures of the different types, and label them. The same for proper nouns, action verbs, etc....

 

For math, we do the same. I have some Waldorf resources (even though we mainly use Mcruffy) so she has a math sketchbook where she has the roman numerals with illustrations, odd & even numbers, multiplication, etc....

 

If we are doing poetry, I have her find a poem she likes, then she copies it into her main lesson poetry book, and then does an illustration.

 

She knows she needs to learn the concept first, then she gets to "be creative". And, we have nice keepsake sketchbooks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm interested in MCT but it doesn't start until 3rd. Thank you!

 

I used MCT with dd beginning when she was 6yo. Just doing a book a year then no grammar until the next Sept. She is very creative, artistic, and loves to write.

 

My advice would be to tailor your child's learning to things of interest. What's wrong with letting them write a story then talk about grammar while editing, use misspelled words for spelling, and vocabulary building by discussing alternative words using a thesaurus or unknown words in what they are reading? I think it's great when they try to turn things into songs and illustrate their written works. Sure it's more work than a canned curriculum but they learn more and retain their love of learning and creativity.

 

Creative Homeschooling by Lisa Rivero may be helpful to you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used MCT with dd beginning when she was 6yo. Just doing a book a year then no grammar until the next Sept. She is very creative, artistic, and loves to write.

 

My advice would be to tailor your child's learning to things of interest. What's wrong with letting them write a story then talk about grammar while editing, use misspelled words for spelling, and vocabulary building by discussing alternative words using a thesaurus or unknown words in what they are reading? I think it's great when they try to turn things into songs and illustrate their written works. Sure it's more work than a canned curriculum but they learn more and retain their love of learning and creativity.

 

Creative Homeschooling by Lisa Rivero may be helpful to you.

Thanks, I already do most of this and it's been going well. I'm glad you agree. I'll check out the book.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have many generations of gifted artists in my family. My youngest has sprung up the same. I'm having trouble getting d/c to not reform every thing we are studying like vocab into a song or drawing and writing own books. I have a first grader here and I need to get the basics in without distractions ha-ha. Is this possible?

 

Honestly, at that age I'd let your dc do a lot of it creatively if that's how they remember it. As long as they learn it, does it matter if it's to a song or a drawing? That's one of the beauties of homeschooling, and six is young. Writing books is great, and that may mean you don't need to do narration or dictation.

 

As your dc get older, you'll want to incorporate more serious things. Both of my dd's are very artistic, but my middle one especially. MCT may be a great choice based on the little we've seen so far that we ordered to try it out.

 

I bought math & grammar songs, but my dd's will make up their own for other things; it's how my eldest memorized a long list of prepositions, for eg. She also used trade books, group classes, etc, for science for a few years because it gave her more freedom and worked better than a curricula would have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I I'm having trouble getting d/c to not reform every thing we are studying like vocab into a song or drawing and writing own books. I have a first grader here and I need to get the basics in without distractions ha-ha. Is this possible?

 

I think you should embrace this. Perhaps these are not distractions to her. It may be the way that she learns and processes information.

 

I have a son that draws a lot and writes story boards as he does his schoolwork. He often stops working to have a "brain dump" on his whiteboard so he can get his ideas out. He almost never does a lab as written, but still comes to the correct conclusions by doing his own open ended experiments. His answers to his science questions show an advanced understanding of the concepts and often tie multiple concepts together. This means they often don't match the answer key & I have to go digging to figure out if he's right. I think my inconveniences are a small price to pay to have a young man that has internalized the ability to approach a question or problem from many different directions.

 

It's been a hard adjustment for this type A mom! I like checklists!

 

I have two videos for you to consider, both Sir Ken Robinson:

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think you should embrace this. Perhaps these are not distractions to her. It may be the way that she learns and processes information.

 

I have a son that draws a lot and writes story boards as he does his schoolwork. He often stops working to have a "brain dump" on his whiteboard so he can get his ideas out. He almost never does a lab as written, but still comes to the correct conclusions by doing his own open ended experiments. His answers to his science questions show an advanced understanding of the concepts and often tie multiple concepts together. This means they often don't match the answer key & I have to go digging to figure out if he's right. I think my inconveniences are a small price to pay to have a young man that has internalized the ability to approach a question or problem from many different directions.

 

It's been a hard adjustment for this type A mom! I like checklists!

 

I have two videos for you to consider, both Sir Ken Robinson:

 

 

 

 

Thanks for the links; I've watched the first one. This was very timely since my 12 yo draws all the time (almost every sheet of school work has drawings in a great deal of the white space, etc. She may be starting high school next year and I'm thinking about just how much art we an do but still do academics which are not only legally required, but which she is fully capable of concentrating on and doing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

She may be starting high school next year and I'm thinking about just how much art we an do but still do academics which are not only legally required, but which she is fully capable of concentrating on and doing.

The key then will be to allow her to express her creativity within the academics that she must study. Science and history are both creative pursuits. Scientists must be able to come up with new ideas and ways to test them and new ways to test old ideas. Historians must be able to see both the big picture and it's parts. To be effective communicators, they must be practiced in the art of story telling.

 

I hope everything goes well with her. We are in the midst of high school prep here as well, weighing our options carefully.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I only have one very artistic child who is now in college. She turned everything into a creation. We did something very similar to this when she was learning the parts of speech

http://ebeth.typepad.com/serendipity/lively_language_lessons/

Children who are gifted usually do best when they demonstrate their knowledge in whatever way they desire. That doesn't mean that we skip traditional tests, but part of the learning process should always involve the form of expression that helps them connect with the material.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The key then will be to allow her to express her creativity within the academics that she must study. Science and history are both creative pursuits. Scientists must be able to come up with new ideas and ways to test them and new ways to test old ideas. Historians must be able to see both the big picture and it's parts. To be effective communicators, they must be practiced in the art of story telling.

 

I hope everything goes well with her. We are in the midst of high school prep here as well, weighing our options carefully.

 

 

Good points.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I only have one very artistic child who is now in college. She turned everything into a creation. We did something very similar to this when she was learning the parts of speech

http://ebeth.typepad.com/serendipity/lively_language_lessons/

Children who are gifted usually do best when they demonstrate their knowledge in whatever way they desire. That doesn't mean that we skip traditional tests, but part of the learning process should always involve the form of expression that helps them connect with the material.

 

 

This is very good. It can be tough, though, if your dc decide to go to ps partway through high school. This is what my eldest decided to do, so we had to change a few things. The director of the math program was quite horrified that I didn't give my eldest tests for Algebra 1, but I explained to her that while ps teachers need to grade on output, many homeschoolers work for mastery before high school (I didn't mention that many do this in high school, too) rather than for grades; that while we go back and have them redo problems they got wrong. But I've never let them do English quite like that!

 

My 12 yo is good with words, too, and when she was 8 wrote and illustrated a long (for her) story with the most humourous pictures that really made the story come alive (lots of movement, for eg she had Henry, the protagonist, come in the house & jump on his sister's bed, and in the drawing he's horizontal in mid air diving onto the bed--later he's leaping from tree to tree as his sister chases him for doing that).

 

For years her composition was better and more original than her execution (and that's okay), but her execution is improving now. I think I'll let her illustrate more of her work, but still want her to write; she is willing to work for scholarships and will need them to go to college if she wants to go right away and not get into huge debt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another idea: Mind mapping may be something that will help your students use their creative talents to learn academic information. Use Both Sides of Your Brain by Tony Buzan is a good book to read to get the ideas behind the concept.

 

Visual Thinking and Mapping Inner Space by Nancy Marguiles are also good.

 

And videos:

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...