Jump to content

Menu

If your child has an intolerance to dairy...


Recommended Posts

and someone gave them ice cream :glare::

 

1. What sort of reaction/symptoms would your child have?

2: How long after consumption would symptoms occur? What's the shortest time frame and longest time frame?

3. How long would these symptom(s) last?

4. Would anything bring relief?

 

Just needing some information. Thanks. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think my guy is a bit atypical, but he may complain a bit of a gut ache the next day, and within a day or two, he would have some very loose, smelly stools. Now that he's six, he usually doesn't tell me about it because he loves ice cream. He will get himself a lactase pill most of the time.

 

I think most people react quicker than he does.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My son is intolerant (not allergic) to dairy. If he had ice cream, he would have stinky gas and stomach pain within 12-18 hours, then, over the next 2-3 days, his behavior would change. He'd be hyper, arrogant, rude and LOUD.

 

The behaviors taper off during days 4-5 and are gone by day 6-7.

 

The only things that *might* minimize (but not eliminate) symptoms for ds are DDP-IV enzymes, probiotics, and extra zinc and magnesium. Activated charcoal might help if given early enough after eating the offending food.

 

HIH,

 

Lisa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think my guy is a bit atypical, but he may complain a bit of a gut ache the next day, and within a day or two, he would have some very loose, smelly stools. Now that he's six, he usually doesn't tell me about it because he loves ice cream. He will get himself a lactase pill most of the time.

 

I think most people react quicker than he does.

 

My daughter will complain of a tummy ache depending on how much she actually ingested. She will have gas in the next few hours and she will have loose stools the next day. The more ice cream' date=' the more loose they would be...[/quote']

 

 

Thanks ladies. When you say tummy/gut ache, where is the pain... is it higher, where the stomach is, or lower where the intestines are?

 

I'm trying to determine if one of my child's stomach ache/slight nausea and (minor) headache are from the big bowl of ice cream ingested yesterday or if they picked up a virus somewhere. There's been no loss of appetite although child isn't eating much due to tummy aching. I'm stumped. I guess time will tell. :tongue_smilie:

Edited by plain jane
Link to comment
Share on other sites

and someone gave them ice cream :glare::

 

1. What sort of reaction/symptoms would your child have?

My son would start throwing up

2: How long after consumption would symptoms occur? What's the shortest

time frame and longest time frame?

12-24 hours

3. How long would these symptom(s) last?

until he was medicated with prescription medication and he

wouldn't be 100% for a couple days

4. Would anything bring relief?

Just medication, over the counter stuff doesn't work on

him.

 

Just needing some information. Thanks. :)

 

I don't know if it is true, but his pedi told me that too frequent exposure to items like that (with my son dairy and soy protein) can cause the symptoms to worsen with each exposure. His pedi sent us home with an epipen so that we can be safe doing food trials. HTH

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From personal experience:

 

1. Incredible stomach cramps, gas and a need to use the toilet.

2. Time frame is about 30 minutes from when I ate it to symptoms. Then I am pottying for about another 45 minutes and then it is over.

3. See above

4. Relief only from getting it out of my system. I can do the lactaid tablets when I eat offending food, but after symptoms start nothing but time helps.

 

For me, pizza is about the worst thing out there. Mozzarella cheese is awful. Hard cheeses are easier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you talking about dairy intolerance or lactose intolerance? There is a class of antibodies that can cause an intolerance to dairy protein (casein). That's different from lactose intolerance, which is caused by the body growing out of making lactase. That happens some time between age 3 and 5 normally. Protein intolerance can be from birth. :)

 

My DD has a dairy protein intolerance. If she eats dairy she will get hiccups within a few hours, which will continue on and off for a day or two. She will also get stomach pains and reflux.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you talking about dairy intolerance or lactose intolerance? There is a class of antibodies that can cause an intolerance to dairy protein (casein). That's different from lactose intolerance, which is caused by the body growing out of making lactase. That happens some time between age 3 and 5 normally. Protein intolerance can be from birth. :)

 

My DD has a dairy protein intolerance. If she eats dairy she will get hiccups within a few hours, which will continue on and off for a day or two. She will also get stomach pains and reflux.

 

To be honest, I don't know. :001_huh: We've been trying to get to the bottom of some health issues and were told by an ND that this child is intolerant to dairy, but more of a sensitivity than a full blown allergy. It was just classified "dairy" and I was overwhelmed with the other findings that I didn't think to get clarification on this point. I've been trying to do our own tests on what this child can tolerate but I'm not getting clear (or typical) results.

 

I've taken the child off dairy but sometimes there's dairy in some of the foods they eat. Yesterday they ingested a bowl of ice cream (first time to have full-blown dairy in months) and I'm trying to figure out if what I'm seeing today truly is a sign of a "dairy intolerance" or merely a coincidence.

Edited by plain jane
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Me: Intestinal pain within 30 minutes, diarrhea within an hour or two, better within three or four hours. If I take nothing prior to consuming milk or ice cream, nothing helps until it's through my system. I'm only intermittently lactose intolerant; I never know when I'll react. I can have ice cream for weeks and then have a problem with it for a week and then be fine again for a while. I'm never lactose intolerant when I'm pregnant; I actually crave and drink LARGE amounts of milk when pregnant without a problem which led to my children having issues early in life...

 

DD10 as an infant/toddler: Constipation, severe diaper rash (think chemical burn with peeling skin), allergic shiners

 

DS8 until he was 4: Diarrhea so frequent he had diagnosed severe learning delays we now know were caused by malnutrition. He's has since caught up and has no issues with dairy whatsoever.

 

DD1 for first year of life: Screaming in pain, fussy all day, green stool, puking, puking, puking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To be honest, I don't know. :001_huh: We've been trying to get to the bottom of some health issues and were told by an ND that this child is intolerant to dairy, but more of a sensitivity than a full blown allergy. It was just classified "dairy" and I was overwhelmed with the other findings that I didn't think to get clarification on this point. I've been trying to do our own tests on what this child can tolerate but I'm not getting clear (or typical) results.

 

I've taken the child off dairy but sometimes there's dairy in some of the foods they eat. Yesterday they ingested a bowl of ice cream (first time to have full-blown dairy in months) and I'm trying to figure out if what I'm seeing today truly is a sign of a "dairy intolerance" or merely a coincidence.

 

Ah, okay. Then my guess would be your ND is referring to a casein intolerance, not lactose intolerance. The whole range of symptoms for my family of 4, every one of experiencing a certain degree of dairy protein intolerance, is:

 

Rash - On the kids it's eczema, but on me or DH it's like seborrheic dermatitis around the nose and mouth

 

Diaper rash on our babies

 

Severe constipation in me and DD1

 

Reflux - very severe in DH and in my babies (think projectile vomiting 20 times a day if I ate dairy at all while they were nursing) but as DD1 has gotten older it's gotten much milder

 

Hiccups - I know this sounds really unbelievable and odd, but given that reflux is a known response to dairy ingestion in people who are intolerant and that hiccups are often a symptom of reflux...I guess it makes sense.

 

I can't tie any specific behavioral problems to it, but I think DD1 gets very belligerent when she eats dairy. She's a pretty difficult kid anyway, though, so that might be my imagination. :tongue_smilie:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know if it is true, but his pedi told me that too frequent exposure to items like that (with my son dairy and soy protein) can cause the symptoms to worsen with each exposure. His pedi sent us home with an epipen so that we can be safe doing food trials. HTH

 

One of mine can't have dairy either. If she accidentally gets a bit, she throws up within 5 minutes. So far, it's been only that, but she's only gotten a tiny, tiny amount.

 

Our pedi told us the same thing: more exposure will lead to worse symptoms. She also mentioned the possibility that dd would outgrow the reaction IF she is NOT exposed at all. The pedi said that, if she is repeated exposed, it's likely she will not outgrow the "intolerance."

 

I guess I need to learn more about this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lacie viewpost.gif

I don't know if it is true, but his pedi told me that too frequent exposure to items like that (with my son dairy and soy protein) can cause the symptoms to worsen with each exposure. His pedi sent us home with an epipen so that we can be safe doing food trials. HTH

 

QUOTE=zaichiki;2092438]One of mine can't have dairy either. If she accidentally gets a bit, she throws up within 5 minutes. So far, it's been only that, but she's only gotten a tiny, tiny amount.

 

Our pedi told us the same thing: more exposure will lead to worse symptoms. She also mentioned the possibility that dd would outgrow the reaction IF she is NOT exposed at all. The pedi said that, if she is repeated exposed, it's likely she will not outgrow the "intolerance."

 

I guess I need to learn more about this.

 

Jumping in late here, but I thought my experience might be helpful to you.

 

Three of my boys have dealt with dairy/soy protein intolerance. The first was not diagnosed until he turned one and we started letting him try milk in a sippy. I was still nursing so it wasn't often he drank milk and we hadn't connected his symptoms to milk yet. Then I had a medical procedure and was unable to nurse him for two days and he drank more milk and his symptoms worsened. Our ped recommended trying soy milk instead, and his symptoms worsened even more. Dairy/Soy Protein Intolerance can be a difficult diagnosis to make, because there is no test to confirm it, and some allergists will treat you like there is no real problem when the skin allergy test does not show a reaction to dairy or soy. Fortunately, we had an allergist who was study dairy and soy protein intolerances and she told us the same thing, that if we avoided these foods completely, there was a chance our son would outgrow the issue. But that if we continued to expose him to it, he would likely be intolerant of these foods for the rest of his life.

 

His symptoms were primarily digestive: upset tummy, loose stools, and horrible, bleeding diaper area rashes. The worst reaction he ever had was when he had to be sedated for an unrelated medical test, and they used propofol, which we didn't know until afterward is suspended in soy oil. So, other than that incident and a few accidental exposures, he was off dairy and soy completely (including label checking for hidden ingredients) from 15 months to age 3. At three he had a soy challenge and then a milk challenge and he did great!

 

Our next son suffered from the same issue, but his presented shortly after birth with severe reflux, projectile vomiting, and diarrhea. I ended up having to go off dairy completely myself the entire time he nursed (19 months). He ended up being intolerant of dairy and soy protein, but also corn. It was a real challenge keeping him off all three- no processed foods and no restaurant foods at all. I was worried that since he also had the corn issue that he might not outgrow these intolerances, but when he turned three we challenged him with soy, then dairy, then corn, and he can now handle all three!

 

So... I'd definitely recommend taking your ped's advice and avoiding these foods completely. The allergist told me many kids will outgrow it by age 3 or 5, of perhaps not at all. But she definitely believes there is a correlation between the level of continued exposure and the likelihood of outgrowing the issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is lactose that they are having trouble with, then some ice creams do not have as much lactose as others. My DD was very mildly lactose intolerant when she was about 12 months. We bought the lactose free milk and ice cream for a year. She must have grown out of it.

 

I think kids that have a more serious milk allergy would have a bigger and more immediate reaction.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to know, Aimee. Thanks!

 

he was off dairy and soy completely (including label checking for hidden ingredients) from 15 months to age 3. At three he had a soy challenge and then a milk challenge and he did great!

 

Our next son suffered from the same issue, but his presented shortly after birth with severe reflux, projectile vomiting, and diarrhea. I ended up having to go off dairy completely myself the entire time he nursed (19 months). He ended up being intolerant of dairy and soy protein, but also corn. It was a real challenge keeping him off all three- no processed foods and no restaurant foods at all. I was worried that since he also had the corn issue that he might not outgrow these intolerances, but when he turned three we challenged him with soy, then dairy, then corn, and he can now handle all three!

 

So... I'd definitely recommend taking your ped's advice and avoiding these foods completely. The allergist told me many kids will outgrow it by age 3 or 5, of perhaps not at all. But she definitely believes there is a correlation between the level of continued exposure and the likelihood of outgrowing the issue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and someone gave them ice cream :glare::

 

1. What sort of reaction/symptoms would your child have?

2: How long after consumption would symptoms occur? What's the shortest time frame and longest time frame?

3. How long would these symptom(s) last?

4. Would anything bring relief?

 

Just needing some information. Thanks. :)

 

*I* am intolerant to dairy. I would start sneezing and coughing - which would last for a few minutes or a few hours. I also tend to start itching - notably on my back and head. Sometimes it is almost immediate, but other times it is an hour or two later - milk and ice cream seem to happen the fastest, cheese, sour cream, etc. take a little longer. If it is really bad, I will take benadryl and it will go away within half an hour or so.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and someone gave them ice cream :glare::

 

1. What sort of reaction/symptoms would your child have?

2: How long after consumption would symptoms occur? What's the shortest time frame and longest time frame?

3. How long would these symptom(s) last?

4. Would anything bring relief?

 

Just needing some information. Thanks. :)

 

1. My son would get a terrific stomach ache. Agony. Laying on the bed moaning and clutching his stomach (from a kid who is very rough and tough and athletic and not dramatic at all). Unable to move, play, or eat.

 

2. Symptoms start within the hour and build in intensity.

 

3. A major exposure, like ice cream, would leave him in pain for days. I know this because when he had a lot of candied popcorn (cream in the candy coating) he was in active pain for three days. The first day was the agony I described in #1. The other days were not as bad--kind of raw and crampy. He was uninterested in food and ate only a little really bland stuff for those three days. Honestly, it took several weeks after that for him to have any interest in eating anything with flavor.

 

4. The anti-diarrhea meds and OTC nausea meds are useless in this instance. They do not help at all. Our son's dr is also lactose intolerant--according to him, the products that allow people with this condition to eat dairy must be consumed BEFORE eating the dairy. Our dr uses those products in order to eat pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving--he says they do not work perfectly, and he is usually uncomfortable anyway, though it's not as bad as it would normally be without those pills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

and someone gave them ice cream :glare::

 

1. What sort of reaction/symptoms would your child have?

2: How long after consumption would symptoms occur? What's the shortest time frame and longest time frame?

3. How long would these symptom(s) last?

4. Would anything bring relief?

 

Just needing some information. Thanks. :)

 

cheeks turn beet red (not as much now, but it's what alerted me to dairy intolerance)

 

extremely smelly gas, diarrhea

 

nausea and stomach pain

 

We use lactose tablets from the health food store. They work far better than the stuff you get in the drug store. Symptoms can last from hours to days, and cam be immediate or delayed. The pills at the HFS CAN bring relief afterwards but not as much as if you took them beforehand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There seem to be some here who have intolerance (digestive upset of varying degrees, usually caused by lactose but sometimes milk protein) to dairy and some with allergies (immune system response which I believe is always caused by the protein).

 

The two conditions present quite differently symptom wise. A person who is dairy intolerant can eat it without it being life or death--but will suffer for it. Allergy is a whole other thing...

 

How is your son feeling today?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...