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I have 3, possibly 4, kids with various learning issues. Most of them deal with language, but that's neither here nor there for this post.

 

As I ponder how to best help them, the thing I'm finding is that either there isn't much in the homeschool market to help them, and what there IS, is really expensive. Whether it be testing or products or tutoring or whatever. I have had to jump through numerous hoops to figure out where to go and what to do to help my kids. While I'm not OPPOSED to getting the public school involved, I'm not crazy about that idea.

 

Have y'all had similar experiences? Have you had to "settle" (as I have/may have to do) on either only partially helpful products to help your kids or (worse yet) not doing much at all, since it is either inconvenient or cost-prohibitive? What would your "dream" intervention/remediation look like? A product that is easily implemented by a parent that doesn't cost and arm and a leg? A tutor geared toward homeschool families? Etc.

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Two of my sisters and I have dyslexic kids.

 

My oldest sister paid more than $25k/year for private school for her dyslexic son. The school is specifically for dyslexic students.

 

My youngest sister sent her son to public school. She has had to fight for what he needs every step of the way, including having him privately tested twice. The school actually told her he is not intelligent enough to be dyslexic!

 

Personally, I have found homeschooling to be the happy medium. It helps that my kids have good insurance that covered their speech and occupational therapy long after they reached school age.

 

My middle child is mildly dyslexic, so for the most part, I used standard curriculum with some adjustments.

 

My youngest dd is severely dyslexic, and here is some of what we've done for her:

Earobics (recommended by her audiologist), cost about $70

Speech therapy

Occupational therapy, including Therapeutic Listening Program and Interactive Metronome as well as sensory therapy

LiPS (Lindamood Bell Phonemic Sequencing), to remediate her lack of phonemic awareness; net cost after re-sale was about $200 for the clinical kit and DVDs

Barton Reading and Spelling (an Orton-Gillingham based program that is scripted and includes all necessary training on DVD), net cost of each level so far is running between $75-$125.

 

I've used standard math, writing, history, and science curricula. We just adjust pace, etc to her abilities.

 

Now that her de-coding is getting better, I think we need something for visualizing/comprehension. We will probably buy Ideachain for that - $300. Hopefully, it will also have a good re-sale value.

 

During the month of November, Lindamood Bell centers are offering testing for $295. They are geared to offering services, but I've heard that their testing is pretty good. I doubt it's as thorough as testing by a NeuroPsych or EdPsych, but it still might give you some valuable information for deciding what to buy. All of their programs can be purchased and taught by parents.

Edited by LizzyBee
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When I was looking for help with my younger son, I found very little of anything, including advice, on how to get him the help he needed. I honestly didn't even know what kind of person to look for to ask questions. I tried our pediatrician, but he was useless.

 

HSLDA has some helpful info, but not enough.

 

I found a local woman who was pro-homeschool and did testing, so we got him in to see her. We found out his issue was his working memory (I hadn't even heard of that before). I had thought that his issue was auditory processing.

 

We finally ended up spending hefty sum of money to get him the help he needed through a speech and language pathologist. He spent an intensive 7 weeks doing Fast Forward last spring. God provided the funds when we needed it, and we have zero regrets about putting him through the program.

 

Now I have a son who is teachable. I didn't have that before. Getting the right kind of help is worth every penny if there's any way you can do it.

 

I would say a SPL is the best way to go. Personally, we felt that if there was something that would help him, we had to do it. I would have sold a car, a camera (I have some expensive gear) or whatever I had to just to get him help. And taking him to the SPL every.single.day was a HUGE inconvenience, but worth it.

Edited by aliya
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Personally, I have found homeschooling to be the happy medium. It helps that my kids have good insurance that covered their speech and occupational therapy long after they reached school age.

 

My middle child is mildly dyslexic, so for the most part, I used standard curriculum with some adjustments.

 

My youngest dd is severely dyslexic, and here is some of what we've done for her:

Earobics (recommended by her audiologist), cost about $70

Speech therapy

Occupational therapy, including Therapeutic Listening Program and Interactive Metronome as well as sensory therapy

LiPS (Lindamood Bell Phonemic Sequencing), to remediate her lack of phonemic awareness; net cost after re-sale was about $200 for the clinical kit and DVDs

Barton Reading and Spelling (an Orton-Gillingham based program that is scripted and includes all necessary training on DVD), net cost of each level so far is running between $75-$125.

 

I've used standard math, writing, history, and science curricula. We just adjust pace, etc to her abilities.

 

Now that her de-coding is getting better, I think we need something for visualizing/comprehension. We will probably buy Ideachain for that - $300. Hopefully, it will also have a good re-sale value.

 

 

Same here..one boy was late talker and late reader..used Spalding and he was up and reading by 4th. I handled his articulation issues with "Straight Talk"

next dtr is severe and I have happily followed in Lizzy Bee's footsteps except we are still at the LIPS stage.(paid $395)..worth every penny. I received OT and Speech privately (paid on a sliding scale for a year and a half when she was younger) and now receive speech through the public school, which I am pleased with. They test her every year for SLP issues. Every three years, they will do an educational/psych test for her. I am glad I went that route because of testing alone. I paid out of pocket for the Auditory Processing test ($800) 18 months ago which gave me a plan of action and this fall, Vision Therapy (testing is $500) ..haven't heard yet what therapy will entail. Every year I tackle the list of the therapies. Next year or so will be Interactive Metronome. So I know what she needs, but am realistic with my budget when it will be addressed.

 

In a nutshell..LD kids will cost you money especially for testing. But the testing by a professional (homeschool friendly or not) helped me name what I was dealing with and what to get started with. The Audiologosit/SLP told me to forget FastFoward for now (private SLP wanted to start this)..and start with Earobics. She saved me $2,000 that year. But she may have to do that program in the future.

I know my greatest frustration was that I just needed quiet one on one time with her 4-5 days a week. I knew that an O-G tutor would cost me $50-80 an hour plus commute time and expense. I decided to pay my older girls a fraction of the amount to keep the toddlers busy upstairs while I taught my dtr for 2 hours. I see you have a large family too, but mostly younger..do you have anyone that can help you, (homeschool friendly)a mother's helper, older woman, teenager, that can come in on a consistent basis to help you while teaching?

 

BTW I now get speech twice a week in the house for my 4 yr old which helps me and my severe dd gets 4 speech session at the local school over three days. SO I have to get inthe car, but atleast it is not costing me anything. If you do not have good insurance, it is something to think about.

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I've felt like I've spent an eternity researching curricula and then tweaking it to make it just so. This is not necessarily a bad thing -- one of the reasons I homeschool is to give my children an individualized education -- but with a special needs child, that is a daunting task in both the planning stages and the everyday execution.

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I have 3, possibly 4, kids with various learning issues. Most of them deal with language, but that's neither here nor there for this post.

 

As I ponder how to best help them, the thing I'm finding is that either there isn't much in the homeschool market to help them, and what there IS, is really expensive. Whether it be testing or products or tutoring or whatever. I have had to jump through numerous hoops to figure out where to go and what to do to help my kids. While I'm not OPPOSED to getting the public school involved, I'm not crazy about that idea.

 

Have y'all had similar experiences? Have you had to "settle" (as I have/may have to do) on either only partially helpful products to help your kids or (worse yet) not doing much at all, since it is either inconvenient or cost-prohibitive? What would your "dream" intervention/remediation look like? A product that is easily implemented by a parent that doesn't cost and arm and a leg? A tutor geared toward homeschool families? Etc.

Yes, I have had similar experiences. Trying to find help has been daunting and frustrating at times. Trying to find the appropriate person to do the needed evals without driving hours away has been a struggle. Trying to find curriculum, homeschooling directed or evenpublic school materials that fit our needs has been frustrating as well. When I finally found curriculums that would work, the public schools had never heard of them and so I knew that I had to homeschool for my child to use them. And they were not 'homeschool' curriculums - they were ones specifically written for use in public schools. We searched and found a good reading tutor, but she isn't one to advertise so the search took longer.

 

So what would I change or fix? I can't think of a single thing other than somehow services and such being easier to find, better connected, and such. I don't mind the research or the adapting of materials, but I would have loved having someone avaailable to help direct and teach me more about what I needed to do and how to do it. I guess that is what this forum has turned into for me.

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:banghead:

 

Just found out that our insurance isn't going to cover most of the testing done by the psychologist for my oldest's PDD evaluation. The particular tests are "educational" and should have been provided by the public school. I plan to appeal because that's the sure fire way of having a MESS on my hands - even if I DID trust the public school (which I don't), I'd have a their testing that I'd need to take to the developmental pediatrician at the hospital, rather than having a TEAM working together.

 

I. Am. Not. Happy.

 

Anyhoo.....just had to vent that out because it's pure and utter ridiculousness that is a perfect example of what I'm talking about here!!!

 

The whole reason for my post is because I'm strongly considering getting a master's in education as a reading specialist and working primarily with homeschooled children simply because it is so. stinkin. difficult. to get help for them.

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