Jump to content

Menu

WHat to do with an avid writer!??


delaney
 Share

Recommended Posts

My 6 yr old is crazy about writing and all she wants to do is make books! I know that for some that would be a blessing but it is making me nuts. What can I do with her to help her along but not squish her joy correcting...analyzing....

just looking for something to help her flow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What part is making you nuts? The supplies left around, the wanting you to hear the story, the asking for spelling help? Maybe you can find a way around that one part, like keeping stuff in one designated spot, or piling books on the table for after dinner instead of reading immediately.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just keep my kids *well* supplied with pencils, paper, notebooks of various sizes, pretty blank books, sketch books, staples, colored pencils... And let them have at it.

 

What's making you crazy about it? Is she leaving bits of paper everywhere she turns? Is the living room a mass of half-finished books, scissors, and broken colored pencils? Are you drowning in finished books? :) Those are all things you can deal with. Find her a specific place for all of her supplies. Require that they be put away when she's finished. Find an appropriate place to store completed books...

 

I do NOT correct my kids' on-their-own-time creative writing unless they ask me *specifically* to do so. We spend a lot of time on grammar and mechanics and they spell very well in school. When they're writing stories or plays or poetry or histories of imaginary lands or menus for fictional restaurants, etc, etc, I do NOT correct those things. If they ask for help, I will give the specific help requested. ... If I have them write a paragraph, story, dialogue, etc for *school*work*, then I will correct mercilessly. ;) But not their "for fun" stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My 6 yr old is crazy about writing and all she wants to do is make books! I know that for some that would be a blessing but it is making me nuts. What can I do with her to help her along but not squish her joy correcting...analyzing....

just looking for something to help her flow.

Uhh, sign her up for NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program.:D

 

Read the information and maybe it will help you let go of "correcting...analyzing..." for a month.;)

 

HTH-

Mandy

Edited by Mandy in TN
to insert link
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just keep my kids *well* supplied with pencils, paper, notebooks of various sizes, pretty blank books, sketch books, staples, colored pencils... And let them have at it.

 

What's making you crazy about it? Is she leaving bits of paper everywhere she turns? Is the living room a mass of half-finished books, scissors, and broken colored pencils? Are you drowning in finished books? :) Those are all things you can deal with. Find her a specific place for all of her supplies. Require that they be put away when she's finished. Find an appropriate place to store completed books...

 

I do NOT correct my kids' on-their-own-time creative writing unless they ask me *specifically* to do so. We spend a lot of time on grammar and mechanics and they spell very well in school. When they're writing stories or plays or poetry or histories of imaginary lands or menus for fictional restaurants, etc, etc, I do NOT correct those things. If they ask for help, I will give the specific help requested. ... If I have them write a paragraph, story, dialogue, etc for *school*work*, then I will correct mercilessly. ;) But not their "for fun" stuff.

Well she does tend to be a bit of a paper tornado. What makes me nuts is that she doesn't want to complete an assignment the way it is given. For instance she was to just write 5 or 6 descriptive words about a tree (from LLATL) and instead she wrote a whole page, cut apart the page, then made a book. I am trying to assess her on one thing and off she goes! Oh well. I bought a template book and will put together some booklets so that after she finishes the grammar assignment or whatever she can write away! I guess since she is ahead by 2 grades in reading and spelling I should just let her fly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

W... What makes me nuts is that she doesn't want to complete an assignment the way it is given...

...Oh well. I bought a template book and will put together some booklets so that after she finishes the grammar assignment or whatever she can write away! ...

 

I would try to separate these things out. When you give her an assignment, she *must* complete it as given. Sure, her way is lovely and creative -- but at her age learning to follow directions as given is *also* a very valuable and important skill.

 

But make it clear to her that once she has done the work as given, she will have complete freedom to work on her own books or stories or do the assignment in a new and creative way, etc. And yes, I think making her some little books and teaching her to make them for herself is a fabulous thing to do.

 

Oh, dd reminds me that she loved this:

http://www.amazon.com/Write-Story-Coloring-Colouring-Books/dp/048623732X

 

Also the Write Me a Story notebooks from eeBoo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest Alte Veste Academy
I just keep my kids *well* supplied with pencils, paper, notebooks of various sizes, pretty blank books, sketch books, staples, colored pencils... And let them have at it.

 

What's making you crazy about it? Is she leaving bits of paper everywhere she turns? Is the living room a mass of half-finished books, scissors, and broken colored pencils? Are you drowning in finished books? :) Those are all things you can deal with. Find her a specific place for all of her supplies. Require that they be put away when she's finished. Find an appropriate place to store completed books...

 

I do NOT correct my kids' on-their-own-time creative writing unless they ask me *specifically* to do so. We spend a lot of time on grammar and mechanics and they spell very well in school. When they're writing stories or plays or poetry or histories of imaginary lands or menus for fictional restaurants, etc, etc, I do NOT correct those things. If they ask for help, I will give the specific help requested. ... If I have them write a paragraph, story, dialogue, etc for *school*work*, then I will correct mercilessly. ;) But not their "for fun" stuff.

 

This is where I have fallen after "suffering" from the same problem. I just created a writing center for my dc and now I just stand back and enjoy. Being a bookaholic, I did put lots of resources in the center, including a cheat sheet for writing rules, dictionary and thesaurus, and a bunch of age-appropriate books about writing. Hands-down, the best one is Look at My Book. It is perfect for your situation. You can preview it here.

 

Others I like, in order of how much...

 

Author: A True Story by Helen Lester (storybook bio about the author's evolution as a writer)

 

It's All About You: Writing Your Own Journal by Nancy Loewen (This is a series of 8 or 9 and my other favorite by her is Sincerely Yours: Writing Your Own Letter.)

 

Making Books That Fly, Fold, Wrap, Hide, Pop Up, Twist & Turn by Gwen Diehn (A lot of this is hit on in Look at My Book but this is more detailed.)

 

Kids Write by Rebecca Olien

 

For you, if you do want to work with her. I am hands-off, but I know some kids actually like direction...

 

Mentor Texts and Non-Fiction Mentor Texts, by Dorfman and Cappelli

 

These are all great books. Have fun whatever you do!

Edited by Alte Veste Academy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

She's six... let the girl make books to her heart's content. Give her some fancy pencils or markers and stickers or whatever she likes, and then let her go to town. I don't know your child, but I really doubt a kid is going to take every single grammar or writing assignment that comes her way over the year and turn it into a book. Book-making, from what I've seen in a number of children, is a phase.

 

From the perspective of someone now homeschooling a teenager, I can tell you that the stage you're describing doesn't necessarily last. Unless there is a pressing need for her to do assignments exactly as specified, both of you should just enjoy it while it lasts. I wouldn't even pre-make booklets for her. Kids this age love to staple, tape, and otherwise bind things together. The minute you hand a child a pre-existing format, you're encouraging a specific use of that format, within its limits. The minute you set a write-a-novel program in front of her, you're telling her that what she's having such fun doing on her own needs to be shaped and determined by a teacher. Unless she's asking for input, I'd let this be her own imaginative world.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In my mind, I think of the skills of writing and book making to be related, but separate. One is... well... writing and the other is a craft related to writing. I'll bet she would LOVE lapbooking - if not quite yet then soon. Also, it may help inspire her to write more if she makes more books to put words in. A book I really recommend is Making Books That Fly, Fold, Wrap, Hide, Pop Up, Twist, and Turn. When we made books for a SOTW unit, I used that and blogged about it here.

Edited by farrarwilliams
typo
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well she does tend to be a bit of a paper tornado. What makes me nuts is that she doesn't want to complete an assignment the way it is given. For instance she was to just write 5 or 6 descriptive words about a tree (from LLATL) and instead she wrote a whole page, cut apart the page, then made a book. I am trying to assess her on one thing and off she goes!

 

So were the 5 or 6 descriptive words about a tree including in her writing somewhere? If so, she's completed the assignment. If not, just have her tell you the descriptive words and let her write what she wants. At this stage the freedom to 'just write' is really valuable to her.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...