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AAS as a phonics program?


scrapbabe
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My 5 year old is reading pretty well for a 5 year old. He can read cvc words, cvcc, and words that use the silent e. These are things that he has just picked up through games, movies, etc. I haven't started a formal phonics program with him. I have looked at some, but we would be starting halfway through some of the curriculum - making it not worth the money.

I was thinking of starting AAS and just moving through slowly. That way he's still getting phonics, but he's throwing in the spelling rules aspect too. So we could start from the beginning, not half way through. I thought we'd get the Phonogram Fun Packet to play and practice. We'll also be using Explode the Code as a supplement.

Anyone else use AAS as a reading program and not just spelling?

 

Shalynn

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I use AAS and ETC as my phonics, spelling, and reading prep. I like the variety of learning options and after 7 weeks am beginning to see how well the programs are working together. I have tweaked them a little to be in a similar order, but I am not fretting over it. My ds does not know cvc words so his reading is a little slower, but the phonics are great and he is growing. My only suggestion would be to get some good readers or continue to have your child reading everyday. The programs only work well as reading programs if a TON of reading is done as well. I worked heavily on the AAS and my son spells very well, but struggles with reading since I didn't supplement with enough reading practice. I have added Christian Liberty readers and McGruffy readers and am noticing a huge improvement. HTH.

 

Jenn

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We use AAS alongside Dancing Bears for phonics/reading. We also have TONS of readers to go along including the cobweb the cat from AAS. So far it is going really well and he has been progressing so much happier and easier then he was with OPTGR! I highly recommend the dancing bears though as it really helps with the blending! for readers we have:

 

AAS reader

Mcguffey

Leap frog sing a long readers

bob books

streck vaughn - blends and digraphs

HOP readers

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Cobweb the Cat was the only book I found for sale on the AAS site, and while it's utterly adorable, I wish I wouldn't have spent the $20 on it for my dd who can already read. It's WAY too short and simple, I would only recommend it for a child who is just starting to sound out simple words.

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Guest Cheryl in SoCal
Cobweb the Cat was the only book I found for sale on the AAS site, and while it's utterly adorable, I wish I wouldn't have spent the $20 on it for my dd who can already read. It's WAY too short and simple, I would only recommend it for a child who is just starting to sound out simple words.

There are more readers now, and more to come. Cobweb the Cat is a level 1 reader and would definitely be too short and simple for a child who is already reading. I think the plan is to have readers for every level.

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We use AAS and ETC for reading/phonics/spelling. My son can read a lot of CVC words and a few other random words that I really have no idea where he learned them. We just started AAS and are also pretty early on in ETC but so far I think they are working great.

 

For Reading practice we have a ton of Dr. Seuss type books and I print emergent readers off of Hubbard's Cupboard. They are simple but ds likes them and he gets very excited when he is able to read one on his own. They have them broken down by topics or by word families (-at, -am, etc.).

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Thank you all so much! I'm going to order AAS and the file folder games that go with it. We'll continue with ETC and make sure we do lots and lots of reading.

 

 

Shalynn

 

Have you already ordered? I just wanted to share that AAS moves incredibly slowly for a phonics reading program. Kids that are able to learn to read at a fairly normal pace should be able to read all 70 phonograms, know all their sounds, and learn all the associated rules in 1st grade. That does not mean that all of those translate to spelling in 1st grade, but they are capable of learning them for reading in 1st.

 

I give my kids all sorts of funny hints and repeat the rules to them when they don't recognize them when they are learning to read. For example, say they have to read the word fruit and they don't remember what ui says. I might wrinkle up my nose and hold it with my fingers. They will guess ewwwww ;) and I will say yes, ui says oo and is used in the middle of a word.

 

You are going to need a lot of levels of ETC or AAS to cover as much phonetically as a 1st grader can process. I know people say that they use them, but there are much better ways.

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Have you already ordered? I just wanted to share that AAS moves incredibly slowly for a phonics reading program. Kids that are able to learn to read at a fairly normal pace should be able to read all 70 phonograms, know all their sounds, and learn all the associated rules in 1st grade. That does not mean that all of those translate to spelling in 1st grade, but they are capable of learning them for reading in 1st.

 

I give my kids all sorts of funny hints and repeat the rules to them when they don't recognize them when they are learning to read. For example, say they have to read the word fruit and they don't remember what ui says. I might wrinkle up my nose and hold it with my fingers. They will guess ewwwww ;) and I will say yes, ui says oo and is used in the middle of a word.

 

You are going to need a lot of levels of ETC or AAS to cover as much phonetically as a 1st grader can process. I know people say that they use them, but there are much better ways.

 

 

My first son learned to read quickly and just took off... a natural reader. My second one did a phonics program, but never really learned the phonetic rules very well. I'm having to remediate him now. Wouldn't it be better to take a little longer and learn it good and solid than worry about being at a first grade level?

I'm sincerely asking here, not being confrontational. :D

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

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My first son learned to read quickly and just took off... a natural reader. My second one did a phonics program, but never really learned the phonetic rules very well. I'm having to remediate him now. Wouldn't it be better to take a little longer and learn it good and solid than worry about being at a first grade level?

I'm sincerely asking here, not being confrontational. :D

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

 

AAS does not move at a "reading" pace. It moves slow for even a spelling pace. The 2 are not really the same. Most kids can read at a much higher level than they can spell. (For example, my 3rd grader is flying through the Narnia series, but her spelling is no where near that advanced and would not be able to spell the same words that she can sound out to read.

 

Take the slower pace for spelling. But if you have a child that is already reading CVC and VCe words at 5, he is not going to need that slow of a pace for reading. You can move through the phonograms as quickly as they learn them. Some kids are slow (my current 5 yr old can't even manage basic alphabet sounds); some kids are fast (most of my kids are reading at a solid 3rd grade level at the end of 1st) You teach them at their pace.

 

The problem with the 2 choices you listed is that you are limited in what they cover and they both are very limited in content/book.

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Guest Cheryl in SoCal
IMHO, it would be better to use AAS to reinforce phonics- not teach it. She does have a program in the works called "All About Reading". I'm sure it will move at a faster pace for teaching reading than AAS.

:iagree:My high schoolers forgot SO MUCH phonics because they didn't study it after 1st grade. Now we're going through AAS to relearn what they have forgotten. With my younger children we'll start AAS when they finish phonics. I'm still toying with the idea of following AAS with Apples & Pears but am not sure. We'll see.

 

ETA that All About Reading isn't out yet. I think the first book is due out this winter but am not sure. I also wouldn't want to start it until I knew the next book would be out in time. Nothing like starting a program and then stalling because the next book isn't out yet.

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We finished a phonics program (OPG) and will continue with ETC for the additional practice. We've also used AAS since month 1 of learning to read, and that has gone well, but I agree that it would go too slow for an actual reading program. Maybe ETC and AAS would be enough by themselves, but I sure am glad I covered phonics systematically with a formal reading program.

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We tried a few reading programs - 100 easy lessons, opgtr, and the reading lesson. My son HATED all of them. He loves etc and AAS. We are moving through them quickly but he doesn't seem to mind the repetition or slow pace so I want to stick with what's working. I'm sure we will go through multiple levels of ETC in one year but they are really inexpensive so I don't mind. AAS is more expensive but if we need to do multiple levels a year that's fine too my son is a little quirky so finding something that works well and he enjoys is really the most important at this point.

 

(sorry for typos. I'm on my itouch)

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We tried a few reading programs - 100 easy lessons, opgtr, and the reading lesson. My son HATED all of them. He loves etc and AAS. We are moving through them quickly but he doesn't seem to mind the repetition or slow pace so I want to stick with what's working. I'm sure we will go through multiple levels of ETC in one year but they are really inexpensive so I don't mind. AAS is more expensive but if we need to do multiple levels a year that's fine too my son is a little quirky so finding something that works well and he enjoys is really the most important at this point.

 

(sorry for typos. I'm on my itouch)

 

 

That's sort of how I feel. Nothing has been a good "fit" for my son. AAS just seemed to stand out at me as something that might work for him. I'm glad it's working with your son.

I have tons of books, board games, online games that I can supplement with if needed. At least I can return AAS if it's not a fit.

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

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AAS does not move at a "reading" pace. It moves slow for even a spelling pace. The 2 are not really the same. Most kids can read at a much higher level than they can spell. (For example, my 3rd grader is flying through the Narnia series, but her spelling is no where near that advanced and would not be able to spell the same words that she can sound out to read.

 

Take the slower pace for spelling. But if you have a child that is already reading CVC and VCe words at 5, he is not going to need that slow of a pace for reading. You can move through the phonograms as quickly as they learn them. Some kids are slow (my current 5 yr old can't even manage basic alphabet sounds); some kids are fast (most of my kids are reading at a solid 3rd grade level at the end of 1st) You teach them at their pace.

 

The problem with the 2 choices you listed is that you are limited in what they cover and they both are very limited in content/book.

 

:iagree:

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Why not try something like Phonics Pathways with AAS. Phonics Pathways will be able to move at your ds's pace and AAS will add reinforcement with spelling. You can start anywhere in PP and it only costs $20 or so on Amazon. You can teach all the sounds of the phonograms at a little faster pace than AAS while you are moving through PP. I'm teaching my dd all the sounds a phonogram makes while using PP and it's working wonderfully. I'm also using Abeka's Phonics workbook for extra practice. We will be done with the K book a little after Christmas.

Edited by momofabcd
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AAS can move as fast or as slow as you want it to. Usually people fly through level 1. The beginning of level 1 may seem easy to you and you may think you don't need it but it is setting a good foundation. Depending on your ds, you can do a lesson a day or every two days at the beginning. You will probably start to slow down a little toward the middle of the book. You should visit the Chatter Bee. This link will lead you to the All About Reading group. On their is a thread about Cobweb the cat and how it coordinates to AAS level one. Your ds wouldn't start reading it until step 15. There are two other readers for level one that are to be used before Cobweb the Cat but they aren't out yet. The pre-level for AAR isn't due out until around January.

If you can find some other readers to use along with level 1 I think you could make it into a great phonics program for your son. Instead of him spelling the words on the list, have him read them. Spell out the words with the letter tiles for him and then have him pull each tile down as he says the sounds and the says the word.

 

The I See Sam readers are a great set of phonics readers.

 

HTH!

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That's sort of how I feel. Nothing has been a good "fit" for my son. AAS just seemed to stand out at me as something that might work for him. I'm glad it's working with your son.

I have tons of books, board games, online games that I can supplement with if needed. At least I can return AAS if it's not a fit.

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

 

Now that I'm off my ITouch, I can elaborate a little more. :001_smile:

 

We are also using a lot of phonics games, board games, online games, Leapster games/videos. My son seems like the type of kid who would do well with a whole language approach - he's definitely visual spatial and remembers everything he sees. So, he is learning to read in a fairly sporadic, random, natural way (though games and reading books) but I want to make sure he gets a good basis in phonics. For this, ETC and AAS are working great. ETC is a lot of review so far but every so often there's a word thrown in that he hasn't seen so it is picking up any gaps. AAS is going over the rules, so will tell him "why" and make new/harder words easier.

 

Since he's primarily learning to read in other ways, I'm not worried about the slower pace of ETC and AAS because they are more review, reinforcement, picking up gaps, going over rules, etc. Since they are working well, I'm going to avoid the trap of "something better", at least for now. ;)

 

My latest weekly wrap-up mentioned some of the games we are using (dice phonics and a few from Kelly's Kindergarten).

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Why not try something like Phonics Pathways with AAS. Phonics Pathways will be able to move at your ds's pace and AAS will add reinforcement with spelling. You can start anywhere in PP and it only costs $20 or so on Amazon. You can teach all the sounds of the phonograms at a little faster pace than AAS while you are moving through PP. I'm teaching my dd all the sounds a phonogram makes while using PP and it's working wonderfully. I'm also using Abeka's Phonics workbook for extra practice. We will be done with the K book a little after Christmas.

 

 

I do have PP, so we could certainly add it in if our pace with AAS is too slow. He also does Headsprout, leapfrog games and DVDs, Happy Phonics, and more. We are definitely exposing him to lots of different ways to learn reading. I appreciate your input. It's helping me to see a clearer picture.

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

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AAS can move as fast or as slow as you want it to. Usually people fly through level 1. The beginning of level 1 may seem easy to you and you may think you don't need it but it is setting a good foundation. Depending on your ds, you can do a lesson a day or every two days at the beginning. You will probably start to slow down a little toward the middle of the book. You should visit the Chatter Bee. This link will lead you to the All About Reading group. On their is a thread about Cobweb the cat and how it coordinates to AAS level one. Your ds wouldn't start reading it until step 15. There are two other readers for level one that are to be used before Cobweb the Cat but they aren't out yet. The pre-level for AAR isn't due out until around January.

If you can find some other readers to use along with level 1 I think you could make it into a great phonics program for your son. Instead of him spelling the words on the list, have him read them. Spell out the words with the letter tiles for him and then have him pull each tile down as he says the sounds and the says the word.

 

The I See Sam readers are a great set of phonics readers.

 

HTH!

 

Thanks Stacy. I have been spending lots of time at Chatterbee to figure out how to use AAS as a reading program.

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

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Now that I'm off my ITouch, I can elaborate a little more. :001_smile:

 

We are also using a lot of phonics games, board games, online games, Leapster games/videos. My son seems like the type of kid who would do well with a whole language approach - he's definitely visual spatial and remembers everything he sees. So, he is learning to read in a fairly sporadic, random, natural way (though games and reading books) but I want to make sure he gets a good basis in phonics. For this, ETC and AAS are working great. ETC is a lot of review so far but every so often there's a word thrown in that he hasn't seen so it is picking up any gaps. AAS is going over the rules, so will tell him "why" and make new/harder words easier.

 

Since he's primarily learning to read in other ways, I'm not worried about the slower pace of ETC and AAS because they are more review, reinforcement, picking up gaps, going over rules, etc. Since they are working well, I'm going to avoid the trap of "something better", at least for now. ;)

 

My latest weekly wrap-up mentioned some of the games we are using (dice phonics and a few from Kelly's Kindergarten).

 

Thank you for sharing what's working at your home! This sounds a lot like my little guy.

 

Smiles,

Shalynn

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