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Modern language with a native tutor


J'etudie
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If you've had the opportunity to have a native speaker work with your dc on a modern language, what did it look like? How often did they meet? Were your dc using a formal curriculum and the speaker worked on them with pronunciation? Something else?

 

Thoughts? Ideas? Experiences?

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My dc meet every 2 weeks for 90 min total (30 min each) with our native speaking Spanish tutor.

 

My dc study their curriculum (see my siggy) each day. . . In their Spanish notebooks, they have a 'tutor' section in which we make notes of any problems, questions, etc as they arise that we want to be sure to review with the tutor at our next chance. During their turns with the tutor, they go over any 'issues' that have arisen, go over their recent exercises in their curriculums, she checks any exercises that require more expertise than me looking at the answer key. . . she previews the next couple weeks of material in their books to go over any key topics or tricky topics. . .she helps them work through a couple/few exercises, especially any lengthy translations.

 

I also picked up See It and Say It in Spanish as a resource for when they have extra time in their tutoring sessions and 'nothing left to go over'.

 

My littlest, 7, does Rosetta Stone at home which doesn't translate well to tutoring sessions, so she brings Spanish story books and the Complete Book of Spanish (a cheap big workbook) and reads stories to the teacher (who helps translate and corrects pronounciation), etc.

 

Games such as Uno or other card games, or even board games, can be nice to do so long as they are done as spanish-only.

 

FWIW, the $$ I spend on our spanish tutor is some of my best $ value in hs'ing IMHO. With that brief session every two weeks, we are able to make such painless progress at home year round. Everyone who speaks with them tells me their accents are perfect and they are excellent students -- I am sure this is due to their long term relationships with spanish tutor. Love it!

 

HTH

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We've done this two different ways.

 

Right now, the kids take a French class with a Francophone teacher. Her focus is oral conversation, but she also works on the concepts in First Start French and then she assigns homework. They see her for two hours each week (one hour on Tuesday and one hour on Thursday) and they do homework at home. We also listen to CDs and do other enrichment at home.

 

Up until this year, all of the kids attended Italian language school for two hours each Saturday morning. Unfortunately, the Italian gov't pulled the funding on this so now it's cancelled :( My dd did 7 years of Italian and really misses it so we're trying to find someone who will work with her privately.

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My dc meet every 2 weeks for 90 min total (30 min each) with our native speaking Spanish tutor.

 

My dc study their curriculum (see my siggy) each day. . . In their Spanish notebooks, they have a 'tutor' section in which we make notes of any problems, questions, etc as they arise that we want to be sure to review with the tutor at our next chance. During their turns with the tutor, they go over any 'issues' that have arisen, go over their recent exercises in their curriculums, she checks any exercises that require more expertise than me looking at the answer key. . . she previews the next couple weeks of material in their books to go over any key topics or tricky topics. . .she helps them work through a couple/few exercises, especially any lengthy translations.

 

I also picked up See It and Say It in Spanish as a resource for when they have extra time in their tutoring sessions and 'nothing left to go over'.

 

Thank you for this detailed explanation of how you do it. I'll print it out for reference!

 

My littlest, 7, does Rosetta Stone at home which doesn't translate well to tutoring sessions,

 

This is what I was afraid would be true. :D

 

Complete Book of Spanish (a cheap big workbook) and reads stories to the teacher (who helps translate and corrects pronounciation), etc.

 

Ah, we have that! That's a good idea.

 

Games such as Uno or other card games, or even board games, can be nice to do so long as they are done as spanish-only.

 

Another great idea!

 

FWIW, the $$ I spend on our spanish tutor is some of my best $ value in hs'ing IMHO. With that brief session every two weeks, we are able to make such painless progress at home year round. Everyone who speaks with them tells me their accents are perfect and they are excellent students -- I am sure this is due to their long term relationships with spanish tutor. Love it!

 

Thanks for sharing your experience. I'll have to give this a lot of consideration knowing there is such a great benefit.

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We've done this two different ways.

 

Right now, the kids take a French class with a Francophone teacher. Her focus is oral conversation, but she also works on the concepts in First Start French and then she assigns homework. They see her for two hours each week (one hour on Tuesday and one hour on Thursday) and they do homework at home. We also listen to CDs and do other enrichment at home.

 

That was my second thought, that the tutor could focus on oral conversation regardless of what they were doing at home. Pondering, pondering...

 

Thank you!

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