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I've had a number of people (mostly family) telling me that I'm teaching my kids too much. My dad told me that I have now "ruined them for public school" because they would know too much and wouldn't be able to fit in. I've had others tell me to stop teaching ds13 because he already knows more than they knew by the end of high school. This isn't a brag in disguise though because when I look at what my peers (you!:)) are teaching their kids it is either comparable or leaves my kids in the dust. Do you ever come across this attitude? I find it a jaw-dropping attitude. How can you learn too much?

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:glare:

 

That is just plain silly. Your kids will thank you when (if) they go to college because they can skip the remedial classes all the public high school students have to go through. They will know how to write a paper the correct way. They will have the independence they need to study without being told exactly how and when to do it. And they will look like they have a lot more time on their hands because they will not have to struggle through basic classes.

 

Just smile and nod, boys ... just smile and nod.

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Not quite exactly that attitude but more of the, "Why would you teach THAT?" I have received hidden looks from ps moms though but frankly, if they didn't question what I teach, they would never hear it. I honestly try very hard not to get into the conversation to begin with.

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I hear it mostly where history and science are concerned (since these aren't really touched upon in our local elementary) and it is compounded by the fact that DD (a natural sponge) picks up on things like the Egyptians, Romans, Boudica, classifications of animals, and electrical circuits just by being in the same room with DS during school.

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I would take it as a compliment! You have thought of that, and it is a wonderful thing to be able to give your child a head start on all that learning it took us so many more years to aquire! Think of all the doors it will open in the future!

 

It's not as if you are forcing something on them, you are giving them what they need. If you had a special needs kid that was not progressing as quickly you would still be doing the same thing, giving your child what they need. Every child has his or her own strengths and we play to them.

 

I wouldn't bother to respond to those snarky comments. Some things need no defense.:D

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Yes. It is very sad when people think like this.

 

Also, almost everyone I talk to about my phonics lessons want me to use the NIV instead of the KJV, especially when I talk about teaching it to inner city students and prisoners. The students love having such a high standard to reach, and many of them attain it...but those that do not during the course of my time with them know that with hard work, it is possible. It is very motivational!

 

My more motivated students leave with homework and DVDs of my lessons to watch over and over. I had one student who watched them 3 times, gaining a grade level each time.

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Yes, I get this attitude...I thought it was just because my oldest is not quite 6 yet. I guess it continues to happen?:glare: I have been hearing, she shouldnt be reading so much, she doesnt need to learn history or science at this age, I expect too much of her....etc etc.

 

Never mind the fact that she enjoys science and history, and I cannot keep her nose out of a book, and she understood multiplication by simply telling her that 3+3 is the same thing as 2*3 because 2*3 is 2 3s.

 

And besides, isnt everybody complaining about the PSs (even people that are in them) and that they are often not as good as they used to be? Why wouldnt I teach more than PSs do if I have a chance to?

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Sadly, they're right. You have absolutely ruined them for accepting society at large. Regretfully, you have probably taught them logic; what a shame! You might have gone so far that they can count back change, and not need a calculator for simple mathematics. Do you understand how that makes others feel? The also might allude to meanings behind sayings, and expect others to know about books that aren't at a simple level. Perhaps you aren't excited to see them reading Twilight, and don't think of it as book report worthy. Wait! Perhaps your kids are beyond book reports.

I have to agree with your friends and family, your children are beyond hope of being ignorant!

For Shame!

 

:)

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Could they mean you're teaching them too much, as in doing it for inadvisable periods of time (such as a twelve-hour school day)?

 

Or did they seriously tell you things like 'THEY KNOW MORE THAN THEIR PEERS, SO THEY'LL NEVER FIT IN!"? Because that's really silly of anyone to say.

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Could they mean you're teaching them too much, as in doing it for inadvisable periods of time (such as a twelve-hour school day)?

 

Or did they seriously tell you things like 'THEY KNOW MORE THAN THEIR PEERS, SO THEY'LL NEVER FIT IN!"? Because that's really silly of anyone to say.

 

No - I teach my children for "too few" hours - even ds13 only puts in about 3 - 4 hours of school.

 

I teach them too much content in that time period because we've done away with all the busywork.

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It has made Calvin stick out at school. One of his peers asked about the availability of a 'Calvin-to-English' dictionary, after C used the apparently unfamiliar word 'ominous'. Calvin is fine with being different; another child might feel the need to hide his learning. And no, I don't regret the education that the boys received at home.

 

Laura

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Yes. This was one of the arguments my dh had against homeschooling at first because of the stuff my 6 year old nephew was learning at the time. Dear nephew could draw a map of Africa from memory, including major cities, rivers, deserts, etc. (among myriad other things he could do). Dh thought this was extremely weird and didn't want our kids to turn into "eggheads" who couldn't relate to other kids. He literally said he didn't want our kids to be "too smart". :confused::confused::confused:

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I've had a number of people (mostly family) telling me that I'm teaching my kids too much. My dad told me that I have now "ruined them for public school" because they would know too much and wouldn't be able to fit in. I've had others tell me to stop teaching ds13 because he already knows more than they knew by the end of high school. This isn't a brag in disguise though because when I look at what my peers (you!:)) are teaching their kids it is either comparable or leaves my kids in the dust. Do you ever come across this attitude? I find it a jaw-dropping attitude. How can you learn too much?

 

Jean,

That is terrible of you! What are you thinking? Don't you want your children to know only what the public school students know? You can't have them getting scholarships or getting ahead! That wouldn't be fair! :confused:

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What a strange attitude. I honestly, truly don't get it. Why is there this attitude that one must order one's life around the requirements and limitations of the public school system? It's as if some people feel that our children are there to serve the needs of the schools instead of the schools being there to serve the needs of our children. I simply can't understand that mentality. It's such a mixed up, twisted sense of priorities.

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When I told my mom (PS Kindergarten and 1st grade teacher) that I was teaching DD (6) ancient history, she expressed concern that it would be "too over her head" and that she really ought to be learning about social studies at that age (what's a mayor? what do police officers do? what's a city? etc.) The comment made me scratch my head because, really, how is one more difficult to learn than the other? :huh:

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It has made Calvin stick out at school. One of his peers asked about the availability of a 'Calvin-to-English' dictionary, after C used the apparently unfamiliar word 'ominous'. Calvin is fine with being different; another child might feel the need to hide his learning. And no, I don't regret the education that the boys received at home.

 

Laura

 

I love this. My dd14 was told by a couple of girls on her swim team to stop using such big words because they didn't know what she was talking about.

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You mean, they wouldn't fit in, in public school?

*

*

*

*

THAT'S AWESOME! CONGRATULATIONS!!!! WHOOO HOOO!!!

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQCcDabV2u3BPSdbhCvhLYm_Wuufmk0jUNxmjW2cfgdkTg9CAc&t=1&usg=__kOqDZfPUsfUcrbDcxYyI44g1Gdk=

:iagree:

Sadly, they're right. You have absolutely ruined them for accepting society at large. Regretfully, you have probably taught them logic; what a shame! You might have gone so far that they can count back change, and not need a calculator for simple mathematics. Do you understand how that makes others feel? The also might allude to meanings behind sayings, and expect others to know about books that aren't at a simple level. Perhaps you aren't excited to see them reading Twilight, and don't think of it as book report worthy. Wait! Perhaps your kids are beyond book reports.

I have to agree with your friends and family, your children are beyond hope of being ignorant!

For Shame!

 

:)

:smilielol5:

I love this. My dd14 was told by a couple of girls on her swim team to stop using such big words because they didn't know what she was talking about.

*I* had friends tell me the same thing in high school. I frequently had to translate for them, and that continued into adulthood. One of the reasons I fell in love with Wolf is that I didn't have to break down my vocabulary for him! :lol:

 

No, I wasn't homeschooled...but I've always been a voracious reader!

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Oh, ruining them for ps has been my goal all along...;)

 

I think I'm just about there...and mine are young!

 

The local ps kindy class is learning colors and days of the week and sight word after sight word. dd5 is reading, phonetically!:svengo: She's known her colors for several years already, and slips right into most of my ds7's lessons... She writes and writes and writes for fun, copying storybooks and anything that interests her.

 

My 7yo would slip right through that convenient crack that most bright, but dyslexic kids find in order to protect themselves against classroom humiliation. Thankfully, he doesn't know anything about classroom humiliation or the cracks to fall through.

 

A funny...at a get-together an adult mentioned something about Omega fats...and one of my little's picked up on it and began singing "alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon....." Oh, the looks...:eek: It was especially funny b/c his expressions are just so stinkin' cute to begin with.:001_wub:

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We get the occasional comment like that. Once, I was unable to step on my husband's foot before he said, "We have to get it all in now so he can devote his senior year to perfecting his chinchilla-juggling technique." More unfortunately, he was talking to rather literal minded people, so I keep expecting a call from the ASPCA inquiring about our cruelty to chinchillas.

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*I* had friends tell me the same thing in high school. I frequently had to translate for them, and that continued into adulthood. One of the reasons I fell in love with Wolf is that I didn't have to break down my vocabulary for him! :lol:

 

No, I wasn't homeschooled...but I've always been a voracious reader!

 

That's me, too! In fact, I consciously dumb-down my vocabulary around a lot of people. They tend to think you're showing off if you use a word they don't know.

 

I guess you could "ruin" your kid for public school. But if they went, think of the great mental exercise your kid will get as a human thesaurus (to find the simplest word to use that everyone can understand.) :tongue_smilie:

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Regardless of what I think of my father's obsession with lawncare, I do find it funny that his neighbors once asked him to stop taking such good care of his lawn because it made theirs look bad. I think this is the same general idea. Also, I think this whole line of argument kind of defeats the "fix public schools from the inside" saw we often hear.

 

Oh, also? I now have the phrase "Race to the Bottom" embedded in my head, thanks to this thread.

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I will say that ds13 has found the other "geeks" at taekwando. He said they have fun discussing algebra, logic and philosophy. These other boys are ps kids so obviously you can be geeks there too. The way they are so excited to find other kindred souls makes me wonder how much they are allowed socially to admit to their interests in learning.

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That's me, too! In fact, I consciously dumb-down my vocabulary around a lot of people. They tend to think you're showing off if you use a word they don't know.

 

 

Yup!!! I know that one! I've also been accused of keeping a thesaurus by the puter by one online group I was in :001_huh:

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My Mom asked when DD gets a day off. When we were sitting at her house for Labor day. After DD had stayed with them for the last 3 days.:glare:

 

My older sister has her kids reading and doing math all summer (ps kids). Some how them working all summer isn't the same?

 

We school year round and take breaks when needed. One of the reasons we school year round is so we can have shorter days. Although she keeps asking to do more so the shorter days aren't working like I had planned.

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We get the occasional comment like that. Once, I was unable to step on my husband's foot before he said, "We have to get it all in now so he can devote his senior year to perfecting his chinchilla-juggling technique." More unfortunately, he was talking to rather literal minded people, so I keep expecting a call from the ASPCA inquiring about our cruelty to chinchillas.

 

 

Oh, this was the laughter I needed today! How funny! I'd love to meet you and your husband!

 

Back to the topic, evidently I've done a disservice to my children, as well. We put them in ps this year, for various reasons, and my oldest, while 'qualifying' for special education classes in reading and math, is WAY ahead of the game in both classes. My youngest, whom I taught to read last year, is in first grade but within a few weeks was bumped up to a 'gifted cluster' (first grade) classroom; however, he's still way ahead of the game in his reading and vocabulary.

 

To think, I'm not even a certified teacher and yet *I* am the one who have taught both of my kids for most of their life! What was I thinking?? :D

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Regardless of what I think of my father's obsession with lawncare, I do find it funny that his neighbors once asked him to stop taking such good care of his lawn because it made theirs look bad. I think this is the same general idea. Also, I think this whole line of argument kind of defeats the "fix public schools from the inside" saw we often hear.

 

Oh, also? I now have the phrase "Race to the Bottom" embedded in my head, thanks to this thread.

 

Oooh. I like that.

 

Oh, ditto on the rest.

 

OP: It's a compliment but it just sounds so stupid. Sometimes I wonder if people just want to hear their mouths fart.

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I will say that ds13 has found the other "geeks" at taekwando. He said they have fun discussing algebra, logic and philosophy. These other boys are ps kids so obviously you can be geeks there too. The way they are so excited to find other kindred souls makes me wonder how much they are allowed socially to admit to their interests in learning.

 

This is true. My ds (now 17) didn't meet anyone of "his kind" in school until he walked into geometry as a freshman. Dd15 was the same way (for her it was her freshman lit class last year) but managed to fit in a little better in grade school.

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I hear the "You're teaching them too much" too. But I tend to get it more from homeschoolers. I've heard it here at these forums too. What is meaningless learning anyway? Is there such a thing?

 

I've heard it so much that I have stopped to re-evaluate, thinking that maybe the majority is right. But I always come back to the same answer - no.

 

I've vented and explained my position on my blog several times.

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I've had a number of people (mostly family) telling me that I'm teaching my kids too much. My dad told me that I have now "ruined them for public school" because they would know too much and wouldn't be able to fit in. I've had others tell me to stop teaching ds13 because he already knows more than they knew by the end of high school. Do you ever come across this attitude? I find it a jaw-dropping attitude. How can you learn too much?

We have heard the same things and have been asked what on earth we will do with them in high school since they will run out of things to learn. :001_huh:

 

Not quite exactly that attitude but more of the, "Why would you teach THAT?" I have received hidden looks from ps moms though but frankly, if they didn't question what I teach, they would never hear it. I honestly try very hard not to get into the conversation to begin with.

 

:iagree: I try to discuss anything beside schooling with people.

 

Sadly, they're right. You have absolutely ruined them for accepting society at large. Regretfully, you have probably taught them logic; what a shame! I have to agree with your friends and family, your children are beyond hope of being ignorant! For Shame!

:D

 

 

We get the occasional comment like that. Once, I was unable to step on my husband's foot before he said, "We have to get it all in now so he can devote his senior year to perfecting his chinchilla-juggling technique." More unfortunately, he was talking to rather literal minded people, so I keep expecting a call from the ASPCA inquiring about our cruelty to chinchillas.

:lol::lol: My husband has the same kind of replies to these things. I need him around more to field the questions.

 

That's me, too! In fact, I consciously dumb-down my vocabulary around a lot of people. They tend to think you're showing off if you use a word they don't know.

I do this too!

 

I hear the "You're teaching them too much" too. But I tend to get it more from homeschoolers. I've heard it here at these forums too. What is meaningless learning anyway? Is there such a thing?

:iagree: I have received more criticism from homeschooling moms than from others.

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I heard this when I was a child. I read everything I could get my hands on - including the phone book and the encyclopedia. So I loved using big words. I was taught cuss words were a form of expression that showed my ignorance so I would search out big words that could be used to insult people. (Not nice, I know)

 

Now I use both. And I do find myself watching the words I use according to who I'm talking to at the moment.

 

Why in the world would someone think all kids must be at the same level? Particularly when the public school level - in general - has a very low set bar?

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Yeah. I've heard it. I heard it when I was a kid. My teachers and parents used to actually punish me by taking books from me because I need to spend my money and time on makeup and being more social with the queen bees.

 

I have heard it with my kids too. Usually moments after they don't know some pop culture thing, which btw, *I* often don't know either and yet have managed to live life not feeling too impaired.

 

My dh has heard it at work. Don't get so much done, you're making us look bad. Coworkers have claimed to be intimidated by his knowledge. Bosses or coworkers have claimed he is being too professional.:confused:

 

Our society worships mediocrity and penalizes hard work, intelligence and having healthy priorities and realistic goals.

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My mom worries that dd won't fit in in public school. Well, this year we sent her back (reluctantly, but it's ok for now) and she's doing fine--she's smart, reads well, etc., and actually has the best social skills in the whole family.

 

I just hope public school doesn't teach her so little that it ruins her for homeschooling. :D

 

As if.

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I've had a number of people (mostly family) telling me that I'm teaching my kids too much. My dad told me that I have now "ruined them for public school" because they would know too much and wouldn't be able to fit in. I've had others tell me to stop teaching ds13 because he already knows more than they knew by the end of high school. This isn't a brag in disguise though because when I look at what my peers (you!:)) are teaching their kids it is either comparable or leaves my kids in the dust. Do you ever come across this attitude? I find it a jaw-dropping attitude. How can you learn too much?

This is why we took my son out of school. His teacher told me this, before we even started homeschooling. We weren't even afterschooling at the time, we just answered his questions.

 

Now, I've had family concerned, but I cast their worries aside by pointing out that ds will not go back to public school. The school here only offers Spanish as a second language. They're removing French this year (no French I offered, next year French II goes &tc). Even ds said that he couldn't imagine going there and not taking French, or the classical languages. Not to mention how they butcher history and beat the kids to death with American History (leading them to hate that subject with a vengeance by high school).

What? You've mastered underwater basketweaving already? :svengo:

 

 

Rosie

I knew I forgot something! Anyone have a link where I can purchase this class for dd?

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LOVE ROSIE'S RESPONSE!!! ROFLOL

 

We were told this when dd was in kindergarten. She entered knowing how to count to 100 and sounding out simple sentences with several "sight words" such as "the, were, was" etc. memorized. Just cvc patterns.

 

The teacher threw a fit because we had taught her so much. There were only 11 kindergarteners in her class (private school) and the teacher was just certain she would not be able to challenge dd. By the end of the first quarter, she was reading (because of afterschooling, not because her teacher did anything about it) and so we agreed that I'd just send lots of books to school with her so that she'd have something to do. I spent the year researching homeschooling and getting my ducks in a row.

 

We've been warned by teachers, pediatricians, pediatric nurses, two therapists (quacks that worked with our niece when she lived with us and whom we fired quite rapidly), and one social worker (again related to niece's situation) that we needed to literally "dumb our kids down" so they'd fit in! The pediatrician that made the biggest stink received this retort from me right before I grabbed ds's hand and hauled him out of the office with lightening speed, "Wow....your fascinating adoration of mediocrity makes me question your skills as an M.D. I am concerned that you have embraced mediocrity and laziness in your own life in order to fit in with your incompetent peers!"

 

The interesting thing is that we've been really proactive about taking field trips which means our kids have spent a bit of time interracting with museum docents, historical tour guides, real scientists, and state park rangers (Michigan has a fabulous ranger program that includes lots of hands-on experiences for children through the parks) and not one time have we ever heard, "Your kids don't fit in or they are too smart." Inevitably, we are congratulated because our children are bright and inquisitive and that is a "breath of fresh air" as one ranger put it.

 

I am convinced that the goal of public education is to create lemmings that will never question the government's activities because they have no ability to form logical thoughts.

 

Faith

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LOVE ROSIE'S RESPONSE!!! ROFLOL

 

We were told this when dd was in kindergarten. She entered knowing how to count to 100 and sounding out simple sentences with several "sight words" such as "the, were, was" etc. memorized. Just cvc patterns.

 

The teacher threw a fit because we had taught her so much. There were only 11 kindergarteners in her class (private school) and the teacher was just certain she would not be able to challenge dd. By the end of the first quarter, she was reading (because of afterschooling, not because her teacher did anything about it) and so we agreed that I'd just send lots of books to school with her so that she'd have something to do. I spent the year researching homeschooling and getting my ducks in a row.

 

We've been warned by teachers, pediatricians, pediatric nurses, two therapists (quacks that worked with our niece when she lived with us and whom we fired quite rapidly), and one social worker (again related to niece's situation) that we needed to literally "dumb our kids down" so they'd fit in! The pediatrician that made the biggest stink received this retort from me right before I grabbed ds's hand and hauled him out of the office with lightening speed, "Wow....your fascinating adoration of mediocrity makes me question your skills as an M.D. I am concerned that you have embraced mediocrity and laziness in your own life in order to fit in with your incompetent peers!"

 

The interesting thing is that we've been really proactive about taking field trips which means our kids have spent a bit of time interracting with museum docents, historical tour guides, real scientists, and state park rangers (Michigan has a fabulous ranger program that includes lots of hands-on experiences for children through the parks) and not one time have we ever heard, "Your kids don't fit in or they are too smart." Inevitably, we are congratulated because our children are bright and inquisitive and that is a "breath of fresh air" as one ranger put it.

 

I am convinced that the goal of public education is to create lemmings that will never question the government's activities because they have no ability to form logical thoughts.

 

Faith

In my opinion, the public schools serve two purposes: To sort the good, successful people from the unsuccessful ones, and to bring them out and make them uniform. Teach them the same things, throw the same ideas at them, etcetera.

 

This is not the only purpose of schooling, of course (knowledge is required in a person's life in general, and I think public education is an incredibly good thing), but I have noticed that it is a large part of how public schools operate.

 

It's competitive. Failure is shown to be the absolute worst thing, instead of knowledge and success being good. You either keep up with the class, or you get screwed. The student must cater to the school, when in reality, it is the school that should be catering to the student.

 

As for what I mean by the 'students in uniform' thing, I mean that they're trying to make everyone very similar. Yes, there should be some minimums in schooling (there are some things just about everyone should know, such as algebra and at least basic English composition), but, ultimately, nothing is individualized; it's 'one-size-fits-all' learning, and you eventually get everyone becoming that 'one size' (or, that's what I think they're trying).

 

However, I dislike the attitudes of a lot of members in this thread. "That's so great! Your kids are superior!" Implies that most public-schooled children are inferior. I have a big problem with the whole idea of taking pride in being a homeschooling parent, because that isn't the attitude that should be had.

 

Homeschooling is nothing but another alternative for learning. A lot of students will succeed in different areas of flexibility. Some do best in a social environment, like in a public school or a homeschooling co-op, and some do best in a cyber school, where they have a mix of structure in their schooling with freedom in how and when they do it.

 

Some, of course, do best in the individualized learning homeschooling can offer, but, again, it is merely an alternative - it is not supposed to be a solution to some horrible calamity that exists in the public school systems.

 

If you learn everything there is to know in every class you take in highschool, regardless of where you go (as long as you're in an honors or AP class), you're going to succeed just as well as the 'ahead-of-the-class' homeschoolers.

 

There is, obviously, no such thing as 'too smart', 'too knowledgeable', or 'too hard-working'. All things in moderation, yes (for example, you can spend an unhealthy amount of time working), but there is nothing saying that you should be limiting yourself to what everyone else is doing. Many people I know don't have work ethic, intelligence, etcetera, and, while they do well enough for themselves, they have not reached their own potential. They want to feel better about themselves, so they set themselves as the 'proper' standard - so, if you do more than them, you are doing too much.

 

On the subject of minimizing your vocabulary, almost everyone I know with a large vocabulary doesn't use it at all times. I know I sure as hell would have to think for a few minutes before actually utilizing my full vocabulary, and anyway, it would be a really silly thing for me to do outside of the realm of self-expression; it would make me sound long-winded and weird. Shorter words are better, most of the time, because you can just get straight and to the point with them.

 

Anyway, this post is getting long and ranty, so I'll just stop it here.

Edited by Wish
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OH P-L-E-A-S-E......

 

I have a cousin who homeschooled her kids until the end of 8th grade. They then wanted to go to PS to play sports and she let them. They told her there was not one thing new they learned that they hadn't already learned from her, but the still did FINE in PS.

 

Dawn

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The interesting thing is that we've been really proactive about taking field trips which means our kids have spent a bit of time interracting with museum docents, historical tour guides, real scientists, and state park rangers (Michigan has a fabulous ranger program that includes lots of hands-on experiences for children through the parks) and not one time have we ever heard, "Your kids don't fit in or they are too smart." Inevitably, we are congratulated because our children are bright and inquisitive and that is a "breath of fresh air" as one ranger put it.

 

 

 

 

Exactly. Because they're not threatened, such folks can appreciate that a kid is smart and interested. We've experienced this as well.

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In my opinion, the public schools serve two purposes: To sort the good, successful people from the unsuccessful ones, and to bring them out and make them uniform. Teach them the same things, throw the same ideas at them, etcetera.

 

This is not the only purpose of schooling, of course (knowledge is required in a person's life in general, and I think public education is an incredibly good thing), but I have noticed that it is a large part of how public schools operate.

 

It's competitive. Failure is shown to be the absolute worst thing, instead of knowledge and success being good. You either keep up with the class, or you get screwed. The student must cater to the school, when in reality, it is the school that should be catering to the student.

 

As for what I mean by the 'students in uniform' thing, I mean that they're trying to make everyone very similar. Yes, there should be some minimums in schooling (there are some things just about everyone should know, such as algebra and at least basic English composition), but, ultimately, nothing is individualized; it's 'one-size-fits-all' learning, and you eventually get everyone becoming that 'one size' (or, that's what I think they're trying).

 

However, I dislike the attitudes of a lot of members in this thread. "That's so great! Your kids are superior!" Implies that most public-schooled children are inferior. I have a big problem with the whole idea of taking pride in being a homeschooling parent, because that isn't the attitude that should be had.

 

Homeschooling is nothing but another alternative for learning. A lot of students will succeed in different areas of flexibility. Some do best in a social environment, like in a public school or a homeschooling co-op, and some do best in a cyber school, where they have a mix of structure in their schooling with freedom in how and when they do it.

 

Some, of course, do best in the individualized learning homeschooling can offer, but, again, it is merely an alternative - it is not supposed to be a solution to some horrible calamity that exists in the public school systems.

 

If you learn everything there is to know in every class you take in highschool, regardless of where you go (as long as you're in an honors or AP class), you're going to succeed just as well as the 'ahead-of-the-class' homeschoolers.

 

There is, obviously, no such thing as 'too smart', 'too knowledgeable', or 'too hard-working'. All things in moderation, yes (for example, you can spend an unhealthy amount of time working), but there is nothing saying that you should be limiting yourself to what everyone else is doing. Many people I know don't have work ethic, intelligence, etcetera, and, while they do well enough for themselves, they have not reached their own potential. They want to feel better about themselves, so they set themselves as the 'proper' standard - so, if you do more than them, you are doing too much.

 

On the subject of minimizing your vocabulary, almost everyone I know with a large vocabulary doesn't use it at all times. I know I sure as hell would have to think for a few minutes before actually utilizing my full vocabulary, and anyway, it would be a really silly thing for me to do outside of the realm of self-expression; it would make me sound long-winded and weird. Shorter words are better, most of the time, because you can just get straight and to the point with them.

 

Anyway, this post is getting long and ranty, so I'll just stop it here.

 

Nonsense. There is nothing wrong with having a basic core knowledge base that a school wants to teach a child. There is something wrong as limiting a child to only the part of that core that they've predetermined should be taught to that age.

 

There is nothing wrong with having competition. There is something wrong with hobbling those at the front of the pack so that they can't succeed.

 

There is nothing wrong with having minimums but there is something wrong when you don't acknowledge that everyone develops on their own time table and sometimes young children esp. are not ready for those minimums at the same time.

 

This thread is not about homeschooling being superior. As was pointed out in a couple of posts there are homeschoolers who have this same attitude of "you're teaching them too much".

 

Of course homeschooling is only one alternative method of schooling. But for many it is our solution to the horrible calamity that is the public school system. It may not be your solution, it may not be the government's solution but it is ours.

 

If you think that if you take all honors and AP courses in high school that you will automatically succeed you are deluding yourself. If you think that if you homeschool that you will automatically succeed you are deluding yourself too.

 

The comments about vocabulary have been about people not being able to express themselves naturally.

 

ETA: A public school or private or charter or hybrid or homeschooling can all work if children are taught as individuals. That doesn't mean that every child has to be separated into little cubicles to be taught! But it means that you recognize that there are developmental differences, personality differences and ability differences and that you accommodate those differences in a way to help all to learn. And it means that you don't have an attitude that you can teach them too much!

Edited by Jean in Newcastle
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