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Very much so! We're currently moving to a home that is less expensive and we're piling all of our extra $ on it to get out of debt fast; living on way less than we make. We have a wood burning stove to heat our house during winter, we have a garden, goats and sheep for meat and milk, chickens for eggs, fruit trees. We have food storage: short term of everyday food we eat, and longer term of the basics (wheat, oats, sugar, etc). We have an emergency fund as well as a stock of emergency supplies.

We're also preparing ourselves with knowledge about the constitution, the founding fathers, and the principles on which our freedoms were originally established. We are currently hosting a study group on these topics with like-minded people in our community.

Additionally, we are preparing spiritually by being more diligent and sincere in our faith: studying scriptures, prayer, service.

 

Preparation is a major theme in our home.

Edited by hmsmith
tmi
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We are preparing, but not in a stockpiling way. We happen to live on 5 acres with gardens, chickens, and an orchard but not for preparedness reasons. That's just our life.

 

We are preparing by protecting our income supply. Dh is a county attorney, and he is dependent on election results. So, he has identified other areas of legal need in our area if he is booted out of a job. He is also in the Air Force reserves, and he can take short-term or long-term active duty assignments if need be. As a last result, he could go back to full-time active duty too.

 

We are debt free and are rebuilding our emergency reserves. A chunk of our retirement money is in Roth IRAs so we could dip into that in an extreme emergency.

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I have a vegetable garden. We live well within our means.

The preparation I am making is mostly psychological. Living more simply, letting go of a consumer mindset. I am getting rid of stuff, selling of excess possessions, because I just feel its time to live more lightly. We dont need as much as we think we do.

We have been 2nd hand buffs for 18 years now (ever since I taught dh how to dumpster dive!) and we already live differently to most, in that we rarely buy anything new and we enjoy finding bargains. We never just go out and buy something we want without really checking out prices (but we also dont go without what we want).

We have a motorhome that we could put on a patch of land if we needed to.

We think about it. But we are really just getting through these next few years with the kids and don't want to do anything too radical till they are older. Then we might move to the country.

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We have a supply of non-perishable food in our walk-in closet for any of those what-ifs. I've found that it also really cuts down on my middle-of-the week trips to the store. We're out of cereal? Grab a new box out the closet. Running low on milk? Mix up a gallon of powdered milk and mix it with what's left of the fresh milk (so it doesn't taste so :ack2:). I've also got a wheat grinder, and I can make bread (I should make it more often than I do).

 

I am trying to gear myself up to start a garden with heirloom plants, so we'll always have fresh produce (and seeds) available.

 

We're starting to snowball our debts (only a year to go!!) and also saving an emergency reserve of funds.

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We have enough food and supplies to give ourselves time to transition over to a self sufficient lifestyle. Unfortunately, at least around here, it is not good to announce that you are prepping because then everyone thinks that they can come to you for help if things get bad and won't do anything to prep for themselves. And I don't want to have to decide between feeding my neighbor's children and my own, so I keep my mouth shut.

 

However, I really don't think it will come to that. IMO, the thing to prepare for is a depressed economy where goods will be available, just very expensive. And money will be tight, moreso for some than others. People will have to learn how to live within their incomes (which may be significantly reduced) because credit will no longer be available. One solution is to save lots of money, which IMO will work only if you can save tons of it. The other is to develop other ways of creating a quality life for your family by growing some of your food to supplement that small amount you can afford to purchase, by knowing how to mend clothing and having various essentials stored so that you buy only a few things for special occasions, to perhaps cut back to only 1 car and figure out how to get all the errands done and family members to work with that, etc.

 

The challenge will be to maintain a high quality of life, good educational standard, and excellent character throughout these times. Some will sink to the lowest common denominator, believing that their needs/wants justify any means. Others will rise above the circumstances to become magnificent people and noble leaders. I know which group I want to be part of.

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We are doing a lot but we don't advertise it to the neighbors.

 

We are raising two pigs on a friend's farm. I do farm chores for her when she travels (which is frequent in the spring and summer) in exchange for the boarding costs. Our cost will be $135.00 each (we purchase feeder piglets and then of course butchering and wrapping) for 140 lbs of lean, home grown pork. We also bottle feed lambs for her when she has orphans and we get cuts of lamb and farm fresh eggs in exchange for raising the little ones until they are old enough to be on their own with the flock. She does too much traveling with her fiber business to bottle feed the weaklings.

 

We are getting a small flock of hens (no roosters - I highly recommend NOT having a rooster if you have neighbors close by). We also have a few ducks those these are 4-H show animals and would be hard, emotionally, to butcher and eat.

 

We board a milk cow at an organic dairy. That isn't so cheap but if we ever couldn't pay the boarding costs, the farmer would allow the boys (when old enough) to earn her yearly keep by hoeing in the fields in the summer, and helping with winterizing the barns so he doesn't have to hire extra help.

 

We have a garden. It isn't big enough yet to sustain us. So, we do get a lot from it but I also buy from an organic Amish farmer and dehydrate, can, and freeze a huge amount. My parents are working to clear their seven acres for more food and animal production. We are just having a hard time coming up with the funds to help with fencing and stables so that the pigs and dairy cow can move off of the other two farms. We will eventually get there though.

 

My apple and cherry trees are trying my patience. That's the hard thing about getting into fruit.....it just takes so long for anything to mature and produce...I only had six apples on my two five-foot tall trees and those were eaten by insects before I could do anything about it! My flegling grape vine was chewed on by a ground hog, and the blueberry bushes managed 13 blueberries. Apparently, it will be eight more years before I actually have a blueberry crop. Thankfully, blueberries and blackberries grow rather thickly on the state land near us and in Michigan, it is legal to pick. So, I still got my year supply of frozen berries. The strawberry patch produced two quarts and I have high hopes for double that next year. The asparagus is too new to be of value yet.

 

We converted to wood boiler heat for the house. Wood boilers burn so efficiently that one can burn most any type of wood, even pine....no creasote build up. A tornado went through and area near us two years ago and there is a ton of downed trees. We get permits from the DNR to take as much out as we want and since some of it is not burn efficient, we then fill in with some oak and hickory that we purchase from a local woodlot. It costs about $500.00 to heat our 4000 sq. ft. reclaimed church/house for one year in the cold Michigan weather. Next year, we hope to have that cost to zero as my parents have some old, falling down oaks on their property which we will be taking in the spring.

 

We'd eventually like to have enough solar panels to provide electricity for the well pump, freezer, and the electronics on the boiler. I'd also like to raise a few meat birds next summer.

 

Faith

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Here is my post from a little over a year ago on our preparations. We have continued along the same lines since that time. As a result, our level of preparedness is better than it was, but we still can make progress.

 

At the same time, I can say that the job situation is now MUCH more tenuous than it had been. That said, I am not overly concerned, because we have many options about moving forward based on our preparations. We'll just have to see how things play out.

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We are getting ready to sell our subdivision house and move to a small farm. Most days we wonder whether we have absolutely lost our minds but the farm seems like something we both believe is worthwhile at this time. We are making the choice for ourselves and our family, not out of fear of the political and economic climate.

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Laura, how big were your bushes when you put them in? Mine were 24 inches tall and unfortunately, I was out of composted poo to put on them. I was afraid to use anything too fresh for fear of it being too strong and damaging the roots.

 

Faith

 

Maybe 18"? Perhaps you could try the poo next spring.

 

Best wishes

 

Laura

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I have a vegetable garden. We live well within our means.

The preparation I am making is mostly psychological. Living more simply, letting go of a consumer mindset. I am getting rid of stuff, selling of excess possessions, because I just feel its time to live more lightly. We dont need as much as we think we do.

 

 

This. I've been trying to become more self-sufficient in growing and maintaining all my own supplies. We don't eat processed foods anymore and I just brought home 1/4 side of beef from a local rancher. I think a big part is not just stockpiling but also building up community - people you know who grow and raise food locally should such a need arise. We've been talking about moving out of the city so we can have more land for chickens & such. But that's still just a dream right now.

 

(BTW, hi Darcy! It's AmyK. :D)

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However, I really don't think it will come to that. IMO, the thing to prepare for is a depressed economy where goods will be available, just very expensive. And money will be tight, moreso for some than others. People will have to learn how to live within their incomes (which may be significantly reduced) because credit will no longer be available.

 

Exactly. I know people deeply in debt with no savings, no skills learned, but they have massive amounts of food stored and a generator. :confused: They are planning for a huge disaster, but they are unprepared for a long-term down economy.

 

We don't need to plan much for economic depressions. As others have said already, we bought a home we could afford easily, don't live a consumer lifestyle, have the skills to feed and clothe ourselves if necessary, and plan for the future in general.

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