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The writing road to reading vs (PR1, OPgtr, PP)


bbrandonsmom
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Is WRR the same method as SWR? Has anyone used it? I checked out WRR and OPgtR to take a look at them. I mainly wanted to phonograms and rules out of WRR, because PP was throwing me on the rules. It doesn't seem to explain the why of things to me, or I have to keep flipping to a page that explains the different ways to pronounce a sound.

WRR is all Spaulding, but she says she uses some OG methods in it. It looks a lot like PR to me. Has the child learn 54 phonograms and write them in a notebook. After that they proceed on learning 30 words a week, writing them in the notebook, marking them with lines and numbers until a certain point. Review each before moving on etc. By the end of 1st g, the word list is something like 700 words and the child knows the rules and the spelling and should grasp the definition and be able to use in a sentence for the grade level.

It's just not broken down nicely like PR1. She even has the kids write stories and create a picture to go w/ it like PR1. But, she does have the kids reading after 8 wks.

I'm still going through PP. We are reviewing endings-y, ang, ish, tch, ch etc, before heading into long vowels this week. I looked through Opgtr and found a similar concept as far as breakdown and how to teach the phonograms. I think both use OG and Spaulding?

But for example, I tried to fine the tch/ch in the WRR and only have 'ch'. She states that the 't' should be included in the word with the 'ch' added on. The rule in PP/Opgtr seemed simpler for a child than how WRR has it, but it could just be me. I'm wondering if I can overlap the 2? WRR is seems very thorough as far as spelling/rules and then reading by those rules. There is a lot of flipping around though and I'm still confused by her order of things.

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The Spalding Method (notice the spelling--Spalding not SpaUlding) is where Barbara Beers and Wanda Sanseri got their start. Even the author of Phonics Pathways refers back to Spalding when she talks (I've spoken with her on the telephone).

 

I prefer Spalding. It's been in use for over 50 years and has a proven track record. I love the way it teaches. :)

 

The others are good, too, and millions of children have learned to read with methods other than Spalding. The important thing is to Pick One and stay with it instead of trying to invent your own method by combining parts of different ones.

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I've never used the WRTR, but I do use SWR. SWR is very similar to WRTR. There are some differences, so hopefully someone that is familiar with both can explain those to you. It's my understanding that SWR is a little easier to implement than WRTR, because more of the "legwork" is done as far as having a guide to help the instructor.

 

I also use OPGTTR, and have had no problem with this overlap. I understand that is not the true SWR way to teaching reading, but honestly the two complement each other well. I think my kids have really reaped a great benefit learning the phonograms to start, and then working through OPGTTR. This year, for first grade, we started the Wise Guide (spelling list) for SWR, and they are making huge leaps and bounds in their reading and spelling abilities.

 

BTW, SWR does teach "tch" as a phonogram - it's called "3-letter ch". Personally, I think this is much easier as the t sound is not really pronounced when spoken.

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I was meaning to overlap by using the Spalding (it appears a bunch of us spell this wrong :) ), and then go to the PP page for review w/ the word and stories they use. Though I like the shorts in Opgtr better than PP.

 

That's good to know that SWR has a tch phonogram-it just wasn't one that was in WRTR at all. Ch was, but not tch. But, for example, on the C card, on the back you have the rule for when it's soft or hard, and PP doesn't do that-the soft sounds of C and G are introduced later. But ds is asking me now, why sounds are spelled a certain way etc. Which I can do easy using the Spalding method I think.

I'm going to see if SWR is in our library to compare to WRtR.

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I was meaning to overlap by using the Spalding (it appears a bunch of us spell this wrong :) ), and then go to the PP page for review w/ the word and stories they use. Though I like the shorts in Opgtr better than PP.

 

 

 

Actually, this is what we do. :001_smile: I realize by reading my post again, it sounded like we completed the entire OPGTTR in K. In actuality, we started it and are still working our way through. In essence, we do use the OPG to review and reinforce what we learned in SWR. Hopefully that is a little clearer. :D

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The Spalding Method (notice the spelling--Spalding not SpaUlding) is where Barbara Beers and Wanda Sanseri got their start. Even the author of Phonics Pathways refers back to Spalding when she talks (I've spoken with her on the telephone).

 

I prefer Spalding. It's been in use for over 50 years and has a proven track record. I love the way it teaches. :)

 

The others are good, too, and millions of children have learned to read with methods other than Spalding. The important thing is to Pick One and stay with it instead of trying to invent your own method by combining parts of different ones.

 

Consider PR SWR/WRtR all laid out w/ less focus on syllabication (aka syllabification) and pounding for dictation; otherwise they are greatly similar and all are great programs.

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I've never used the WRTR, but I do use SWR. SWR is very similar to WRTR. There are some differences, so hopefully someone that is familiar with both can explain those to you. It's my understanding that SWR is a little easier to implement than WRTR, because more of the "legwork" is done as far as having a guide to help the instructor.

People may have felt this way with previous editions of WRTR, but the fifth edition is full of charts and sample dialogues and all sorts of helps--things that have been part of the Spalding Method all along but which are now more obvious in the manual (WRTR is the manual for the Spalding Method).

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I have the third ed checked out. And you're right Ellie-it is the Spalding manual. There are samples of each spelling notebook page in there. There are spelling lists to start w/ and breakdowns of how to do it, and approx how many weeks it should take to cover the material/each level. She does break it down nice, but at least in the edition I have, it seems a lot of flipping around. If you could copy it and put it in a 3 ring note book w/ tabs, I think you'd basically have PR1 as far as spelling :)

 

In this version, she says to write out the spelling lists w/ the syllables, and if needed, show the child the breakdown of them using right/left hand. But she says to do that only for spelling. For reading, to read fluently, not stumble over the syllables. so on the spelling lists, the word are broken up, like 'lit le', or 'moth er' and have the correct markings for the phonograms.

 

Tina, maybe you can answer this-how does PR add OG into it?

 

There are just no jingles of course-you need to make them up yourself if you wanted them :)

 

I still want PR and it may be a xmas gift to myself if I can swing it.

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"Tch" is included as an "uncommon phonogram" in the fifth edition of WRTR, I am not at all familiar with earlier editions. I know Ellie says that she DOES have the spine removed from her copy of the 5th edition and places it into two three ring binders. I have placed post-it tabs on my copy, but haven't had it altered. I have done a bit of flipping, but really not a horrible lot, and I don't think that I will have to flip at all once we have the routines down and I know the material myself. I don't think the 5th edition gives nearly as nice pacing information as you describe, though. Spalding has Teacher's Guides for each grade available, but I ended up deciding that even used it would not be worth it to me, they are quite expensive. I have the 5th edition of WRTR and the Spelling Assessment manual and was able to figure out what I needed to do from those. I typed up the rules in a one page format, printed that and stuck it into a page protector, that way I have a list of the rules at my finger tips.

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People may have felt this way with previous editions of WRTR, but the fifth edition is full of charts and sample dialogues and all sorts of helps--things that have been part of the Spalding Method all along but which are now more obvious in the manual (WRTR is the manual for the Spalding Method).

 

I tried...really tried to use the 5th Ed of WRTR to implement Spalding and couldn't do it. I just wanted to chime in that it isn't as cut and dried as you stated. SWR was much easier for me. I know that some people find SWR confusing and PR is a better fit. From what I've seen of PR, it wouldn't work for me. I think it depends on the person. They're all good programs but the nuances can make a big difference to the teacher.

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I have the third ed checked out. And you're right Ellie-it is the Spalding manual. There are samples of each spelling notebook page in there. There are spelling lists to start w/ and breakdowns of how to do it, and approx how many weeks it should take to cover the material/each level. She does break it down nice, but at least in the edition I have, it seems a lot of flipping around. If you could copy it and put it in a 3 ring note book w/ tabs, I think you'd basically have PR1 as far as spelling :)

 

In this version, she says to write out the spelling lists w/ the syllables, and if needed, show the child the breakdown of them using right/left hand. But she says to do that only for spelling. For reading, to read fluently, not stumble over the syllables. so on the spelling lists, the word are broken up, like 'lit le', or 'moth er' and have the correct markings for the phonograms.

Tina, maybe you can answer this-how does PR add OG into it?

 

There are just no jingles of course-you need to make them up yourself if you wanted them :)

 

I still want PR and it may be a xmas gift to myself if I can swing it.

markings; spelling words to learn how to read them; dictation; application of same rules w, slightly different wording so they fit into the Rule Tunes.

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