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There was a blind chickie in one of my uni classes. She taped all the lectures so she could listen again later, and had an aide with her. The aide helped her to the different classrooms, which I'm sure came in really handy when they switched rooms on us :glare: and I would imagine she also read the assigned readings aloud onto tape too. I never asked though. If you are wondering what support services are provided, don't colleges have disability support units? You could contact them.

 

Rosie

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My husband has low vision and is legally blind. It can be such a vague diagnosis, and some people are completely ignorant of the special needs of that person and their family. My husband leads a normal and active life as a ps choral director, but cannot drive. Along with other "small" things that get in the way. Recognizing people, reading print, finding keyholes, all can be difficult especially in unfamiliar locals. He covers his special needs well, so most people never know. He adapted to college by sitting on the front row, asking for printouts of overhead projections, and developing a freakish memory. It took longer to look something up, so he learned to remember it the first time he read it. Sorry if I ramble, but no, I do not know of any specialized schools, but adaptations can be made. You have to ask for them, but public colleges must adapt for the special needs of their students, and I would assume private ones do too.

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An individual with a visual impairment - whether low vision or blind --would qualify at a college or university for accommodations under 504 and ADA. When I ran the DSS office I had a number of students that were blind and several who were classified as visually impaired/low vision. Depending upon the student they used things like note-takers that took notes which were then typed into a computer program to be read to them, turned into braille or simply provided enlarged print. We did the same for exams or the student took them w/ a proctor who read the exam and recoded the students answers. All of the VI students I worked w/ rec'd services through Voc Rehab also which paid for aides if necessary, specialized equipment and often for tuition/fees. The students also utilized RFB and Library for the Blind services and if a book wasn't avail or couldn't be made avail in time we provided it in a recorded format, braille, etc.

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The problem is that classification of visually impaired/low vision. Low vision isn't the only problem; some can only use their vision for short periods at a time. Inflammatory fluctuations in vision can be a problem. The person can be fine one day and near blind the next during a flare.

 

Yes - but for purposes of reporting and arranging services most in the field come up w/ categories (VI(covered all visual issues); ABI (Aquired Brain Injury); HI (Hearing Impaired - including deaf) - etc.) But, if a student came in a showed documentation of the "disability" or medical condition and said, "I need......" Then services could still be provided - in the case where problems fluctuated it was best to arrange full services for the worst case scenario.

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