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TOG user friendly?


desertmum
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As this is our first year of hs and it happens to be pre-school I feel I can manage planning lessons and such. As we move up I feel I may need some help. I am considering TOG but after reading the website I was left with the impression that they sell you a guide on how to use other books and that is it. I know I am probably wrong but can you tell me about TOG? Does it bring detailed lessons plans, or do I have to go through the list of books and figure up what I am going to do that week? Also, the list of books suggested was really long. How expensive does it get for a year if you buy them all, and what happens if you do not?

 

Sorry about the long post but TOG appears to be a good curriculum but also one that looks as if I will have to save towards and budget for (not to mention shipping can take weeks!).

 

:bigear:

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Do you only have a 4yo?? If so, just wait. I love, love, love TOG. There is a great post about starting TOG with a kindergartener and then your reading the rhetoric level to get you up to speed and self educate. Yes, I suppose there is a point there. I love TOG because I have so many different levels of children and it is a great resource. If I only had one.... I'm not sure I would need ti. I STRONGLY suggest you download their three week sample and print it out so you can see it all. I am currently using it with a 10th grader, 8th grader and 3rd grader. We are on year 4 and will have finished one run through the 4 year cycle. For the first couple of years, all I did with my youngest is just get a book from the library on the subject each week...most of the time it wasn't even on the TOG list. It worked well. I was concentrating on getting her to read.

 

Last year I did more and this year I am doing even more with her. She is somewhere between lower grammar and upper grammar. I had many of the books on the list and use the library for other. This is the first year I actually bought some books for her and they were only the ones used 4 weeks or more. For the grammar stage, they have projects and activities so any books you have on the subject will work. The exception might be the worksheets that go with literature. For those, you need the books but to be honest this is the first year I've actually done them with her. Once you get into dialectic and rhetoric, you need to get the books and yes it is expensive. But I love books. I've had most of the literature selections for my high schoolers on my shelf anyway.

 

TOG is a fabulous teaching guide and pretty overwhelming at first. To me, it is best for junior high and above. I like the way we started it when my older two were in 5th and 7th. That was a perfect age to start. It would be overkill if you only had an early elementary child. To me, anyway. But I did choose it partly so I could incorporate my youngest into the mix. I also love jumping between levels and I do that a lot. The first year my middle child was in between upper grammar and dialectic and so I did alittle of both that year. This year that same boy is 8th and doing rhetoric level history with his brother, but a modified rhetoric literature with a little dialectic lit in there and/or progeny press guides instead of the overwhelming TOG analysis. ( Just did that with All Quiet on the Western Front..oldest did TOG assignments and younger boy did the Glencoe guide..easier and not so abstract and analytical.)

 

Christine

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We first bought Tapestry when our oldest was in seventh grade.

 

It's essentially lesson plans - think of it as a Sonlight IG just super expanded. It has your spine readings, additional readings, art study suggestions, writing assignments, teacher notes, worksheets, etc. all in one spot. So, no, it isn't just a reading guide of what to read and when.

 

That said, I wouldn't have used it if the only child I had was younger than about 3rd grade.

 

Truly I feel the best part of Tapestry is Dialectic & Rhetoric levels. I don't believe it was ever meant for a four year old. :)

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As this is our first year of hs and it happens to be pre-school I feel I can manage planning lessons and such. As we move up I feel I may need some help. I am considering TOG but after reading the website I was left with the impression that they sell you a guide on how to use other books and that is it. I know I am probably wrong but can you tell me about TOG? Does it bring detailed lessons plans, or do I have to go through the list of books and figure up what I am going to do that week? Also, the list of books suggested was really long. How expensive does it get for a year if you buy them all, and what happens if you do not?

 

Sorry about the long post but TOG appears to be a good curriculum but also one that looks as if I will have to save towards and budget for (not to mention shipping can take weeks!).

 

:bigear:

 

TOG clicks for some people and not others. For me it made sense right away. But TOG is considered a buffet. It has a LOT of options, and no one can do them all. The danger with a new hser and someone with young children is that there is so much good stuff you don't want to stop. You and the child can burn out pretty quickly.

 

I would put TOG on the back burner and not even do formal history right now. A 4yo is so hands on I would try to find stuff they could play with, pictures to look at that sort of thing. Toob toys actually puts out an Egyptian set, and that combined with the Usborne early reader on Egyptians, and maybe the Early Civilizations History Pocket (or another Egyptian craft book) would make a good hands on exposure to Egypt for a 4yo.

 

Heather

 

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I use TOG with my 6 and 4 year old. It is our first year hsing and I use it as our history and arts activity guide. We use the books list for literature and supplements. I love it and enjoy having a loose guide for the early years. It is NOT rigorous at this level and just a great introduction. I am planning on following the cycle through once, then taking a four year break for some other really great classical curriculum and then finishing off the last cycle with TOG again. If you have other little ones coming along and plan to use it further down the road, I suggest the DE version. We love TOG!

 

Jenn

CT - 6

CA - 4

CW -2

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Wow, thank you for the information. It has made things clearer for me. I only have one child and he is very young for his age. I think I will do as Choirfarm suggests and download the trial and see what the lessons looks like in black and white. He is definitely not ready for history yet, but he is doing astronomy as he is mad about planets and stars and such...

 

How does TOG compare to Sonlight? Please?

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Wow, thank you for the information. It has made things clearer for me. I only have one child and he is very young for his age. I think I will do as Choirfarm suggests and download the trial and see what the lessons looks like in black and white. He is definitely not ready for history yet, but he is doing astronomy as he is mad about planets and stars and such...

 

How does TOG compare to Sonlight? Please?

Sonlight has a set schedule, telling you what to read each day by page number. Generally there is a history/second and then a read aloud section and a reader section (with core 1-7Alt). The lower levels will blend those, not separating them out as much. In levels 100 and up the Core is written for the child to read on their own.

 

Where TOG is a unit study having one topic that the book recommendations revolve around, SL blends history. So in year 1 of TOG you have Egypt:Nile, Egypt: Pharaohs & Pyramids and Egypt: Polytheism and the Judgment of God. TOG has a purpose in what they cover each week, a specific part of history being looked at, which is roughly chronological, but is more laying a foundation to tell about the Exodus. SL won't include Bible in the study, it is treated as a separate subject, so they will simply cover Egypt chronologically. If there is a book on King Tut SL will cover it when it gets to him. That same book happened to go into depth on multiple Pharaohs then TOG would would it in week 2 and SL would schedule each of the Pharaohs as they came up on the history timeline in between reading other books.

 

The way they are designed to be used is also a bit different. TOG at the UG level is to be read to the child, and at the UG and up is to be read by the child. As I stated before SL doesn't have the child reading independently their history till Core 100. Though people modify both. :D

 

Where SL will have daily readings, TOG is set up to be done in a block schedule. Do all the history on day MOnday, read the literature on Tuesday, do the mapping and lit worksheet, Thursday do discussion and Friday do the writing.

 

TOG covers a lot more topics and blend them together with the time period in which they were an influence. Art history, Music history, Worldview and for older kids Government, Philosophy and Architecture. SL covers most of them briefly but not as in depth as TOG will and not always blended together. For instance both cover a lot of missionaries, but TOG covers them in year 3 and 4 when they were most active and covers church history before that. SL will cover them with each core, even ancient history and does not combine Biblical history with secular other than what might be in a spine they choose to use (like SOTW refers to Abraham, the Tower of Babel and the Birth of Jesus, but those are the only ones I remember. TOG makes Biblical history a focus.

 

I could go on, but I will stop there. Both are excellent programs. SL has way more than I covered in PS in a more engaging way then I ever covered in PS. TOG does go farther but it is also more work. It isn't for everyone. If you do something like 80% of the R level it is considered advanced placement into college.

 

Heather

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TOG clicks for some people and not others. For me it made sense right away. But TOG is considered a buffet. It has a LOT of options, and no one can do them all. The danger with a new hser and someone with young children is that there is so much good stuff you don't want to stop. You and the child can burn out pretty quickly.

 

I would put TOG on the back burner and not even do formal history right now. A 4yo is so hands on I would try to find stuff they could play with, pictures to look at that sort of thing. Toob toys actually puts out an Egyptian set, and that combined with the Usborne early reader on Egyptians, and maybe the Early Civilizations History Pocket (or another Egyptian craft book) would make a good hands on exposure to Egypt for a 4yo.

 

Heather

 

 

 

:iagree:

 

To me, TOG is incredibly user friendly because it's what this user wanted. :D I came to hs'ing after a few years of researching and choosing a basic philosophy of how we wanted to educate our kids. I also had a loose plan of how I wanted our days to run, e.g., how much time spent on academics, how much time in or out of the house, etc. I did two years of MFW and even though it was laid out day by day, I was tweaking it to fit into the schedule I wanted. So TOG was perfect for me because it gave me more than I could ever use and I was able to pick and choose what I wanted to put into my own timeslots.

 

We're using an LCC-style schedule in that we do our content areas (geography, history, literature and science) once a week in a long afternoon block. So I only take from TOG what will fit into the time I want to spend. If, once you really get into homeschooling, you find that you prefer a more laid out plan, then TOG might seem like more work for Mom than Sonlight or WinterPromise, something with day-by-day plan.

 

Definitely look at the three-week sample and then just do Play-Doh and library books with your little guy for now. :)

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I've done a few comparisons on my blog in the past... One when I was trying to decide between them before using Tapestry and one after. I followed TWTM for a long while. When the chaos began to get the best of me ;) I turned to Sonlight as I had long admired the catalogs. And we're now at Tapestry and have been for a while. :)

 

While considering:

http://truevineherbs.wordpress.com/2009/06/03/sonlight-vs-tapestry-of-grace/

 

And then:

http://truevineherbs.wordpress.com/2009/06/10/sonlight-vs-tapestry-update/

 

And then finally:

 

http://truevineherbs.wordpress.com/2009/07/14/sonlight-vs-tapestry-of-grace-the-last-battle/

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Sonlight has a set schedule, telling you what to read each day by page number. Generally there is a history/second and then a read aloud section and a reader section (with core 1-7Alt). The lower levels will blend those, not separating them out as much. In levels 100 and up the Core is written for the child to read on their own.

 

Where TOG is a unit study having one topic that the book recommendations revolve around, SL blends history. So in year 1 of TOG you have Egypt:Nile, Egypt: Pharaohs & Pyramids and Egypt: Polytheism and the Judgment of God. TOG has a purpose in what they cover each week, a specific part of history being looked at, which is roughly chronological, but is more laying a foundation to tell about the Exodus. SL won't include Bible in the study, it is treated as a separate subject, so they will simply cover Egypt chronologically. If there is a book on King Tut SL will cover it when it gets to him. That same book happened to go into depth on multiple Pharaohs then TOG would would it in week 2 and SL would schedule each of the Pharaohs as they came up on the history timeline in between reading other books.

 

Heather

So grateful to you all. This is a lot of information. Not to mention that BlsdMama left me few threads to read LOL. I am going to read every tiny bit of these and then go and think some more. However I now get the difference between the TOG and SL, and more importantly I got to understand how a unit study works!

 

:thumbup:

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So grateful to you all. This is a lot of information. Not to mention that BlsdMama left me few threads to read LOL. I am going to read every tiny bit of these and then go and think some more. However I now get the difference between the TOG and SL, and more importantly I got to understand how a unit study works!

 

:thumbup:

 

I have been using TOG with my only child for the past year. We love it! I agree with the others that it would be best to wait, but I want to encourage you to definitely keep it in mind. According to info I've read about TOG is that it was designed to begin when the oldest child in the family is in 5th grade, then you just bring the younger siblings in for exposure to the subjects the oldest is learning. I started my dd when she was 5th grade, and it was perfect.

 

Blessings to you as you learn and explore your options in hs'ing.

 

Lucinda

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