Jump to content

Menu

Moving to another state at the end of our hs year...do I need to report?


Recommended Posts

If so, to which state?

 

It is looking more and more certain that we will be relocating in the spring. By the time we move, there will only be approx. 20 days left in our hs year. So I won't need to do the year-end reporting in our state since we'll be leaving, right?

 

But what about in our new state? I will still finish out our year, of course, but do I need to file the hs letter of intent (and whatever else) for only 20 days at the end of the year, or can I just wait till the new school year to start reporting?

 

Does any of this make sense?!:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depending on the ages of your kids, I wouldn't worry about it. We left our last state in May... I contacted the HS Coordinator for the county a few months prior, and he happily took me off his roster and said "buh-bye!". We got to our new state and I registered the kids as HS'ers for the fall.

 

The only thing that might be different is if your children are in high school and they need to worry about credits, but I'm guessing that is not the case.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've moved a couple of times during the school year. Usually in the late fall though so I can't slip under the wire. Check with your new state. When we came here we had 10 days, by law, to send in our notice of intent. And a year end assessment had to be completed so we could send the results with the next year's notice of intent.

 

If your new state does not have all those hoops, don't worry about notifying them you are there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The last time I moved, it was a couple of months before the official "end" of the reporting season for my state. I just went ahead and moved and kept sending in the reports to the place I left. They were just attendance sheets - eh.

 

Where I live now doesn't require reporting, so I don't have to worry about it, but if I did, I would have just registered once I got to the new place for the new school year.

 

 

a

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Our state requires you to notify them if your situation changes (enter into public or private school, move out of state, or even out of the school district). Our state office notifies the school district with our name and address, so I'm sure it could be an issue if you didn't notify them here. I would check the laws closely for both states. We're looking at moving out of state, so I've been checking into this too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends on which state you move to. In Arkansas you have 2 weeks after moving to turn in the required paperwork to the superintendent of your school district. Failure to do so could result in truancy charges.

 

Other states, different laws so I would check requirements. And I would report to the state you are a legal resident of - not the one you left.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would look specifically at the state requirements where you are moving. We are required to notify at the BEGINNING of a school year. We moved there in May and I didn't send in notification until the beginning of school in the fall.

 

This happened to us too. We did finish our school year before the move, but ps here still had about 6 weeks left when we got here. I just waited til August to send in the intent letter for the fall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It really depends on the two states you are talking about. Without knowing that, we won't be able to give you useful advice. :001_smile: Each state has their own specific laws, and your best bet is someone who lives in that state.

:iagree:

In some states, you don't need to report at all, ever. You really need to ask someone who knows the laws for your original state what you need to do to close out your program there, and someone who knows the laws for your new state about the beginning-of-year process in that state.

 

There may also be different choices in the new state to consider, as some states have several paths to homeschooling. In mine, Pennsylvania, I count ten paths, though some are less realistically viable than others, and of course one of the ten is underground homeschooling (which is not legal, but more widespread here than you'd think).

 

(The ten are: being too old or too young to fall under the compulsory attendance laws (and thus not reporting), establishing a home education program, being privately tutored, attending a church school, attending an umbrella school, enrolling in a public cyber-charter school, getting homebound instruction through the school district, being excluded under the immunization regulations, claiming a religious exemption under the Religious Freedom Protection Act, and homeschooling underground. The vast majority of independent PA homeschoolers establish a home education program; the number of public cyber-charter students is also substantial.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It really depends on the two states you are talking about. Without knowing that, we won't be able to give you useful advice. :001_smile: Each state has their own specific laws, and your best bet is someone who lives in that state.

 

We'll be moving from PA to NY. And we'll be done before the public schools since we start our year in July. But by the time I'd file my letter of intent (I think I have 14 days), they'd send me the proper info, I'd fill it out and send it in, we'd already be done!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:iagree:

In some states, you don't need to report at all, ever. You really need to ask someone who knows the laws for your original state what you need to do to close out your program there, and someone who knows the laws for your new state about the beginning-of-year process in that state.

 

There may also be different choices in the new state to consider, as some states have several paths to homeschooling. In mine, Pennsylvania, I count ten paths, though some are less realistically viable than others, and of course one of the ten is underground homeschooling (which is not legal, but more widespread here than you'd think).

 

(The ten are: being too old or too young to fall under the compulsory attendance laws (and thus not reporting), establishing a home education program, being privately tutored, attending a church school, attending an umbrella school, enrolling in a public cyber-charter school, getting homebound instruction through the school district, being excluded under the immunization regulations, claiming a religious exemption under the Religious Freedom Protection Act, and homeschooling underground. The vast majority of independent PA homeschoolers establish a home education program; the number of public cyber-charter students is also substantial.)

 

Are you the askPauline who has the website?! That site has been soo helpful to me over the years!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We'll be moving from PA to NY. And we'll be done before the public schools since we start our year in July. But by the time I'd file my letter of intent (I think I have 14 days), they'd send me the proper info, I'd fill it out and send it in, we'd already be done!

 

All righty, I can't help you with either of those states, but I bet someone else here can! NY or PA people???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If so, to which state?

 

It is looking more and more certain that we will be relocating in the spring. By the time we move, there will only be approx. 20 days left in our hs year. So I won't need to do the year-end reporting in our state since we'll be leaving, right?

 

 

If you're in PA, you *do*, in the PDE's opinion, have to file your end-of-year paperwork, basically to show that you were in compliance with the law during the school year. Your evaluator should be willing to do the evaluation before you have finished your 180 days. I would not submit a huge 3" binder of samples to the district - I'd do an abbreviated portfolio, and submit only a copy of it, so that you don't need to stress over getting it back. I'd also include a cover letter explaining that you are moving and won't be submitting an affidavit for the following year.

 

That's the short answer - a longer, more complex one is at my web site.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...