Jump to content

Menu

Teach Your Child to read in 100 Easy Lessons


Recommended Posts

I have a daughter who is 4 and will be 5 in 1 month, she is very smart and was thinking of purchasing " Teach Your Child to read in 100 Easy Lessons" book. Just wanted some feedback as to a good learning to read program I can start my daughter with so that she will love to read and also be able to read , even at a greater level.

Thanks

Lillian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a daughter who is 4 and will be 5 in 1 month, she is very smart and was thinking of purchasing " Teach Your Child to read in 100 Easy Lessons" book. Just wanted some feedback as to a good learning to read program I can start my daughter with so that she will love to read and also be able to read , even at a greater level.

Thanks

Lillian

MomsintheGarden taught our five youngest children to read using this program. (Of course only after purchasing several expensive reading programs first for the other two! :tongue_smilie:) Our children are all excellent readers!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We used 100 EZ lessons successfully. My children did not need further phonics instruction. I highly recommend it.

 

ETA - My children started sometime after they turned 4 and completed it after they turned 5 - just to give you an idea of the age range. One child went through with no breaks - the other had to take a couple of breaks, but she still finished prior to the end of her K year.

 

We used stickers on the calendar after each lesson and the reward of their very own library card once the 100 lessons were completed. We incorporated the Bob books after the lessons where all the sounds for a particular book were introduced and finished the rest of the Bob books after completing 100 EZ. Then we went right into easy readers from the library. By the end of K my first child was reading Magic Tree House by himself.

Edited by Brenda in FL
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I purchased this to use with DD who was struggling a bit with learning to read, but ultimately it did not work for us. Phonics and the repetitive nature of books like Dick and Jane did it for her. She's a very strong reader now (both DC are). Of course, YMMV... every child is so different!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought it on the recommendation of a hsing friend way back when I never thought about hsing! My ds needed a 'crash course' in reading before entering 1st grade in ps (long story) and my friend highly recommended this book as she used it successfully with her four kids.

 

We got about half way through the book before ds took off on his own with chapter books.

 

I also used it with dd at the same time (she was barely 4 1/2). She wanted 'reading lessons' like her brother, so I obliged her for fun. Much to my surprise, she was hungry to learn and in three months, she, too, got about half way through the book before picking up 'real books' and hasn't looked back.

 

One note, though~~ I had to cover the pictures that accompanied the stories because my ds would look at them and 'guess' (correctly!) many of the words, rather than read them. So, I started covering the pictures, and after he read the story, he couldn't *wait* to uncover them and see what was drawn. (I'm assuming the book hasn't changed over the years and still has the cute cartoon after the passages).

 

As an aside, I loved this book *so much* that it is still in a box in my attic all these years later in case it goes out of print and we have grandkids that need help learning to read. :D :D (my dc are 15 and 13 now!) I still say that book was the best $20 I ever spent!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used this with my twins and am now using it with my youngest.

 

My twins started it when they were 5 and in preschool (fall birthday) and finished it up early in K (right before they turned 6). Obviously, we didn't do a lesson a day.:tongue_smilie:

 

I did no further phonics instruction with them. I'm not sure what the school did, to be honest. By the end of K they were reading the first couple of Harry Potter books.

 

The son I am working with now will be 5 next month. We started early in the year, with lots of gaps in between lessons. We're now on lesson 58.

 

I'll be honest, he pitches a fit every single day when I tell him it's time for his reading lesson. What we've settled on for the last month or so is to do 10 minutes a day. (We use a timer.) Each lesson takes us 2-3 days to do, at a rate of 10 minutes a day. (We don't do the writing part.)

 

I considered giving up on the lessons because of the fits, but he is constantly asking me what words say, or trying to sound out words when we are out and about, so I know he's developmentally ready. And he seems to be enjoying the process more lately, even though he still protests.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried it for pretty much the reasons you stated when my second dc was about the same age as your dd. It did not work for us at all. The combination of my weakness with phonics and her (as yet undiagnosed) dyslexia made it impossible. We switched to Saxon Phonics, a program that I love love love! It finally explained phonics to me, and was a great program for her. I got it used. I've taught 3 dc to read with it, and have 3 more coming up, so I definitely got my money's worth!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After using it with three children successfully, I have 3 tips...

 

1. Do NOT use it unless your child is begging and ready to read!!! My youngest always wanting to be like her elders so at 5 she BEGGED me to do it, after about lesson 25 she was saying "Mom, I'd rather play right now, can we do it later??" so she just wasn't ready...but at 6.25 she was again very ready and we zoomed through 100 lessons in 3 months...she was off and reading at a 3rd grade level in months...never looked back!

 

2. Have a 100 block posterboard where they pick out special stickers to put them on after completing each lesson, they loved this and sometimes we did 2-3 lessons in one day...they soared when they were ready...

 

3. After finishing, I spent a good deal of time doing sharing reading (you read a page, I read a page) and I always have read 1-2 hours a day aloud (even now at ages 11-15!!) this helps with any slumps we may have had...our all time favorite first book after 100 EZ lessons was "My Father's Dragon" by Ruth Giles Stannett...I think my husband endured 300 readings of it between all three! :)

 

Enjoy and read it word for word! :)

Tara

Link to comment
Share on other sites

After using it with three children successfully, I have 3 tips...

 

1. Do NOT use it unless your child is begging and ready to read!!! My youngest always wanting to be like her elders so at 5 she BEGGED me to do it, after about lesson 25 she was saying "Mom, I'd rather play right now, can we do it later??" so she just wasn't ready...but at 6.25 she was again very ready and we zoomed through 100 lessons in 3 months...she was off and reading at a 3rd grade level in months...never looked back!

 

2. Have a 100 block posterboard where they pick out special stickers to put them on after completing each lesson, they loved this and sometimes we did 2-3 lessons in one day...they soared when they were ready...

 

3. After finishing, I spent a good deal of time doing sharing reading (you read a page, I read a page) and I always have read 1-2 hours a day aloud (even now at ages 11-15!!) this helps with any slumps we may have had...our all time favorite first book after 100 EZ lessons was "My Father's Dragon" by Ruth Giles Stannett...I think my husband endured 300 readings of it between all three! :)

 

Enjoy and read it word for word! :)

Tara

 

:iagree: Excellent advice!

 

Tried it with one kiddo at 5 and he wasn't ready. Tried again at 6.5 and he begged for "one more lesson" after we finished each day! He FLEW through and was reading World Book encyclopedia articles within weeks (he's a science kid).

Mine all loved the 100 chart and a sticker for each lesson.

Hope you enjoy it, too!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is one of those things that you have to try and see how it goes. Every child is different. For example, OPGTR wasn't a good fit for a couple of my kids. Great book just not right for the individual child.

 

I would suggest checking at a used book store. I was able to get a very nice copy of 100 EZ Lessons for $5.

 

I used 100 EZ Lessons with 2nd dd. She would hit a plateau and we would put it away for 3-4 months. This happened several times. Finally we jumped ship at lesson 60. She did better with the whole word method (ducking the tomatoes ;) ).

 

I recently acquired another copy which I'm using with my 8yo. It is a good fit for her. We were using Rod & Staff, but she was relying too much on sight words.

 

To me, reading lessons depend a great deal on the individual child. Good luck. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...