Jump to content

Menu

So what is a good program for teaching lit analysis??


Recommended Posts

Yesterday I listened to SWB's lecture on literature analysis, and even though I only have a few things on my shelves for lit (unlike the entire shelf of writing materials), we don't need anything else for a while (or at all). Her lit plan is wonderful! :thumbup1: I just posted about Dr. Stobaugh's courses, and I am considering them for later years of high school. However, I have thinking about how to prepare. SWB's ideas will get us there.

 

Bonita

Edited by 1Togo
Corrections
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Even though I have a solid background in both analysis and criticism of both film and literature, I found it helpful to use some introductory programs, which exposed us to some works I would never have thought of; kept me from trying to make us analyze EVERY work (just did the ones in the program); and kept me from expecting TOO much in the way of discussion from DSs in the first few years.

 

I did not feel I needed Teaching the Classics, since I already understood how literary analysis works, but I understand that can be a great start to "teach the teacher" how to teach literary analysis. Things I have found helpful in our literary analysis journey:

 

- start by discussing films and TV shows with your DC; look for repeating images and themes (what might be a symbol, and why do you think that? it's easier first to see visually than to read and see these things.

 

- GREAT ideas on learning what literary analysis is in this thread on Literary Analysis vs. Plot Summary, and in this thread how to guide discussion: "How do I do a Rhetoric Level Discussion"

 

 

gr. 5-8

- Figuratively Speaking (introduce literary elements, the "tools" you'll look for and use in analyzing a work of literature)

 

gr. 6-9

- Lightning Literature & Composition 7 (gr. 6-8) and 8 (gr. 7-9) (extremely gentle year long intros to literary analysis, with each unit in each program focusing on a single literary element)

 

gr. 7-10

- Literary Lessons from the Lord of the Rings (full year study of the Lord of the Rings trilogy; best parts are the chapter notes and discussion questions, and the 12 additional units of tangential material)

 

gr. 8-10

- Windows to the World (1 semester study, covering 6 short stories; teaches annotation, which is then used for examples to support a literary analysis essay; exercises; and very clear helpful instruction in how to write a literary analysis)

 

 

Lit. guides to go with individual books help give us a "springboard" for discussion; we have found these guides to be helpful:

 

- Garlic Press Publishers "Discovering Literature" series, challenger level

(secular; meaty! -- background info on author/work, discussion questions, writing assignment ideas, teaching text on literary elements, etc.)

 

- Portals to Literature series

(secular; classroom oriented, but can be adapted; some "fill in the blank exercises", but also discussion questions and writing assignment ideas, and lots of background info on author/work)

 

- The Great Books guides

(Christian; guided Q&A discussion from a worldview, rather than literature, point of view)

 

- Progeny Press guides (Christian)

- Sparknotes guides (secular; free online)

- Cliff's Notes guides (secular; free online)

- Glencoe Literature Library guides (secular; free online)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I had to pick a single book for a high school level (and beyond) student, I would choose Lotman's The structure of the Artistic Text. An excellent introductory text that really helps students' perspective on literature shift into the right direction (from thinking on the level of content to thinking on the level of form and understanding what makes a text an artistic text, i.e. literature).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did not feel I needed Teaching the Classics, since I already understood how literary analysis works, but I understand that can be a great start to "teach the teacher" how to teach literary analysis. Things I have found helpful in our literary analysis journey:

 

- start by discussing films and TV shows with your DC; look for repeating images and themes (what might be a symbol, and why do you think that? it's easier first to see visually than to read and see these things.

 

 

Thank you for this bit. During a prolonged illness at our house, we watched almost all 15 seasons of the original Stargate (SG-1) TV show. I have been embarrassed to tell people how many literary terms and ideas they boys acquired during that time; they noticed the themes and allusions, and I gave them the language (terms) to help them discuss what they were seeing.

 

Thanks, too, for the other suggestions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for this bit. During a prolonged illness at our house, we watched almost all 15 seasons of the original Stargate (SG-1) TV show. I have been embarrassed to tell people how many literary terms and ideas they boys acquired during that time; they noticed the themes and allusions, and I gave them the language (terms) to help them discuss what they were seeing.

 

 

Wow, I'm so glad to hear that. We've watched rather too much SG-1 this summer (first 5 seasons!), and I'm glad to hear we weren't just rotting our brains. :lol: I do have to say that one of my dds has been doing all kinds of research on runes and the Phonecian alphabet... Are there really 15 seasons??! I was thinking it was something like 8... or are you including Atlantis?

 

Better not tell my kids - I told them it was cold turkey on the SG-1 other than weekends once school started...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I had to pick a single book for a high school level (and beyond) student, I would choose Lotman's The structure of the Artistic Text. An excellent introductory text that really helps students' perspective on literature shift into the right direction (from thinking on the level of content to thinking on the level of form and understanding what makes a text an artistic text, i.e. literature).

This board is so enabling :lol:. I went to Amazon to look up this book, as it sounded just what I was looking for, and when I saw there were only 5 copies, starting at $48 and from there going up by $50 increments, I thought I'd better snatch it up quick! ;) (Before droves of interested WTMers grabbed the rest :D).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This board is so enabling :lol:. I went to Amazon to look up this book, as it sounded just what I was looking for, and when I saw there were only 5 copies, starting at $48 and from there going up by $50 increments, I thought I'd better snatch it up quick! ;) (Before droves of interested WTMers grabbed the rest :D).

 

You and me both :lol:. I bought the only affordable copy in Europe through Amazon.uk. I'm fine with you buying the American ones :D.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wow, I'm so glad to hear that. We've watched rather too much SG-1 this summer (first 5 seasons!), and I'm glad to hear we weren't just rotting our brains. :lol: I do have to say that one of my dds has been doing all kinds of research on runes and the Phonecian alphabet... Are there really 15 seasons??! I was thinking it was something like 8... or are you including Atlantis?

 

Better not tell my kids - I told them it was cold turkey on the SG-1 other than weekends once school started...

 

I looked it up -- actually there are ten seasons.

 

I guess my point is that certain habits of observation, that can be applied to any story-telling genre (film, tv, whatever) can serve our students well when faced with the daunting task of "literary analysis," which sounds so scary. The first step, I think, is noticing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...