Jump to content

Menu

Talk to me about Pit Bulls.......


Recommended Posts

My 19 yo ds who has been living on his own since June of this year has just bought a 12 week old female pit bull. I can't say how much this freaks me out after years of reports on the news about these dogs.

 

How much of what I hear should worry me? Are these dogs being unfairly branded by the media? I am sure how they are raised has something to do with it, but I have also hear of the family pet killing or maiming a child it lives with. I suppose this can happen with dogs other than pit bulls, but honestly I am not educated about this topic.

 

I am worried that when this dog is grown it could hurt my son or hurt someone else and then my son would be liable. Am I paranoid? Unreasonable? If you have a pit bull or know about them please tell me what you know! I need reassurance and when I go meet this puppy tonight I want to be armed with some information.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 124
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

In 20 years working in the veterinary field they are one of my favorite breeds, ESPECIALLY with kids. They are very tolerant to poking and prodding, and LOVE their people. Yes, they tend to have issues with other dogs if not socialized with them, but they do not have a breed tendency to attack humans. In fact, when they were used for pit fights they were specifically bred NOT to hurt people, because there were people in/around the ring so they needed a dog that could be in the middle of a dog fight and yet not bite the humans in the frenzy. Any dog that was not able to do this was killed. Also, in England they were called "the nursemaid dog' because they were so good with kids. And even in the US they were a favorite family pet. Petey on Little Rascals is a pit bull!

 

As long as he takes the dog to a puppy class to socialize with other dogs he should have no problems at all. Encourage him to learn about positive training methods an intense socialization, but I'd say that for any breed. And tell him congrats on getting a life long companion!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wanted to add that many many of the people I work with in veterinary settings have pit bulls themselves :)

 

We see every breed and wouldn't do that if we thought they were dangerous. I've seen ONE case of a pit bull attacking a human, and it was a bizarre situation where the live in girlfriend had a seizure and fell on top of the dog, seizing on top of it. The dog seemed to think it was being attacked. The woman recovered, and kept the dog, and never had a problem with it again.

 

The worst human bites I've seen have been inflicted by labradors, beagles, and an Akita. Oh, an also a trained Police Dog that bit one of the technicians. I've only ever been bitten by little dogs...one stupid schnoodle jumped up an bit my belly button an hung on, hanging from it, when I was 8 months pregnant!!!! vicious little dog. But even then the issue was the owner's training methods (dominance based), an as I was grabbing gauze to put on the bleeding I was telling the owner to stop the alpha roll he was doing to the dog ....sigh.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As with any dog, If they are socialized properly they are wonderful pets. My husband and I have owned 4, currently we have 2. They are 9 and 5 months.

 

Our kids love them and they love the kids. Both dogs take commands from the boys... sit, down, roll over, kisses. These dogs generally love people and hate to be alone, they want to be part of a family. Our dogs even get along with our cat, although the cat does not appreciate their affection.

 

They are very smart, eager to please you, affectionate, and they make very good garbage disposals (ours love any people food we give them).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love Pit Bulls. When properly trained they are the most wonderful and loving dogs. Back in the day in England they were referred to as "The Nanny Dog" because they are so amazing with children.

 

Like the German Shepard Dog, The Doberman, and The Rottweiler-the pit bull is having his day of being bashed in the media.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I'm going to be the voice of dissent. I would never own one, and I would be hesitant to allow my daughter around one. I worked as a vet tech for several years, and this was one breed that the doctors always dreaded seeing walk in the door, never owned themselves, and would absolutely NEVER recommend to people (they would also never recommend Rottweilers, Chows, and believe it or not, Dalmations). This breed was developed for fighting. That's not the kind of animal I would ever choose for a family pet.

 

From wikipedia:

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in 2000 a study on dog bite-related fatalities (DBRF) that covered the years 1979–1998. The study found reports of 238 people killed by dogs over the 24-year period, of which "pit bull terrier" or mixes thereof were reportedly responsible for killing 76, or about 32 percent, of the people killed by dogs in the attacks identified in the study. The breed with the next-highest number of attributed fatalities was the Rottweiler and mixes thereof, with 44 fatalities or about 18 percent of the study-identified fatalities. In aggregate, pit bulls, Rottweilers, and mixes thereof were involved in about 50% of the fatalities identified over the 20-year period covered by the study, and for 67% of the DBRF reported in the final two years studied (1997–1998), concluding

"It is extremely unlikely that they [pit bull-type dogs and Rottweilers] accounted for anywhere near 60% of dogs in the United States during that same period and, thus, there appears to be a breed-specific problem with fatalities."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weird. I *just* finished reading this article about a pit bull attack and discussions of banning the breed in a nearby city and came to check the boards. Your topic was the first to come up.

 

The 6 yo in the article was attacked by 3 pit bulls. Two adults and a puppy. She required 500 stitches to her head and face and will be hospitalized for months :(.

 

I've had my own bad experiences with pit bulls, so, no, I would not own the breed. I absolutely agree that the way the animal is raised and breeding come in to play, but due to the viciousness of their attacks, no way. I don't think you're being unreasonable or paranoid.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love Pit Bulls. When properly trained they are the most wonderful and loving dogs. Back in the day in England they were referred to as "The Nanny Dog" because they are so amazing with children.

 

 

I can totally see this. My bff adopted a pit from a rescue. The spent a LOT of time working with her to get her over her fears of men. She was trained beautifully. However they were VERY responsible owners and stayed on top of her, like you would a child that can get it self in trouble easily. She never got in trouble, but they were always there to make sure didn't have a chance. They felt that was more of an issue due to her being abused, than the fact she was a pit bull.

 

As for the Nanny Dog thing I can totally see this. When my son was a 2-3 months old, we stayed with them for a visit. It was a tiny 3 room apartment that was housing 3 adults, 1 dog and a 2 month old with a pack and play. He'd be sleeping in teh living room in the basinet. She'd stand guard. The minute he made any noise, she'd rush to us. If we didn't move fast enough for her liking she'd start barking to get us moving faster.

 

It wasn't an upset, 'that thing that smells funny is making a horrible noise' type of reaction, but more of a "hurry, Timmy fell down the well" Lassie type of reaction. She'd run to us, turn back a few steps, come back to us, then go a few steps. Just trying to get us go check on him.

 

As he got older she was still wonderful with him and we'd only seem them about once a year. She had a habit of stealing his sandwiches off plates, and even out of his hand, but even then when little hands hold half a sandwich, there is a lot flapping at the other end. I walked in just as she was gently eating off the other half. Very careful of his then 2 1/2 year old fingers.

 

Treat her well, treat her well and love her and she'll be a great dog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Because there's conflicting research and opinion, I wouldn't be willing risk my children's safety over a "maybe." I might take a personal risk--that's my choice--but my children's lives are way more important to me, and I won't take those same risks with their safety.

 

Some dogs may have undeserved [bad] reputations, but IMO, when looking for a pet for my children, I'm going to go for the dog that has the most pristine background check possible.

 

Chihuahua's can have pretty nasty dispositions but they don't have the brawn to go with it to make them truly dangerous to most people. You have to weigh the risks, and having a good personality isn't all there is to it.

 

Additionally, it bothers me that many people don't recognize aggressive behavior in dogs, and therefore unknowingly allow or encourage traits that should be discouraged for everyone's safety. We have friends that seem to think it's cute/funny when their cocker spaniel growls and snarls at guests, mouths their hands and legs, etc. They've already had to put down a previous dog (also a cocker spaniel) for attacking two children.

 

If you have a laid back personality, you shouldn't own a large dog anyway. They have to be kept in check simply because of their size and strength, if for no other reason.

 

Just my 2 cents. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My family, growing up, had a personal friends who had a very sweet, female pitt bull. She was well trained, and had been with this family and with the kids in the family since she was a puppy (I think she was four or five) In fact - my dad - who never really trusted any dog, would comment on what a sweet dog she was.

But then she tore the face off their 6 year old son. No provocation. Parents were on the front porch watching the kids playing, pitt bull comes up, jumps on the kids, and rips him apart.

He died.

Sorry to be graphic - but this is not the only case I have heard of reagarding Pitts turning. I have also heard this about rottweilers, but don't know anyone personally.

I say - with so many other wonderful breeds out there, why take the chance?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your son is 19 and the dog is a pup. If he takes the time to properly train her, she could be a good pet to him. However, I would caution him strongly to not allow her around little kids. I know that will offend pit owners, but that's my stance. To me, it's just not worth the risk.

Edited by Mejane
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What ktgrok said.

 

Have a look at these myths here, on the Stop BSL site:

http://stopbsl.com/fortherecord/myths/

 

It covers all the usual issues & gives the facts.

 

funny-dog-pictures-young-picasso.jpg

 

Punish the deed, not the breed.

 

 

OH & statistically, what do the experts agree on about dog bites? Male, unneutered dogs are the biggest offenders.

Testosterone -----> aggression. Neuter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK- well the first few posts made me feel better....lol. Just a repeat, this is not my dog nor is it going to live in my house around my small children. This is my oldest ds who lives on his own, with a roommate and the roommate has a 7 month old german shepard/lab mix. So, this dog will grow up with this other dog.

 

I am going to my son's house tonight to meet the dog and I will talk with him about raising her. I will also ask where he got her and if he knows anything about her parents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

Punish the deed, not the breed.

 

 

OH & statistically, what do the experts agree on about dog bites? Male, unneutered dogs are the biggest offenders.

Testosterone -----> aggression. Neuter.

 

I wouldn't ever ever ever own a pit.... although I'm sure...they can be decent dogs. BUT, last time Hornblower put this bit about pits, it's weird, I was out about town and started noticing the pits. It's not "in" to neuter pits, I guess!! I counted maybe 5 or so.... and they all looked well endowed!

 

Walking around town, when you're 19... seems to be in style... with an unneutered pit. UGH.... BUT, at some point those huge chains they have around their necks.... are being clung onto by some precious 3 year old...

 

SO.... I'm sure a ton of it is the training... and the not wanting a neutered pit.

 

:(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to say, there is rarely such thing as "attacking without any previous signs". There are signs, no one recognized them or took them seriously.

 

A pit bull can be a great pet. As long as your son has done the research, is investing in proper training, and has the ability to be a consistent pack leader all will be well with the dog.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My ds was attacked by a pit bull. Maybe attack is too strong of wording...the sign he got was a bite in the face. The bite severed his tear duct and scraped the top inside of his mouth. So sure, there was a "sign", but it didn't come until there was blood and damage enough to require surgery. The dog was apparently giving my little boy a warning. Thankfully she didn't go any further or he would have easily had his face ripped off. The pitbulls owners were our neighbors. They had raised the dog right and loved her like she was their child. They were shocked that this happened. My son did not provoke the dog in any way. He was standing near the dog and it lunged and bit him. I will not risk my children further with this breed of dog. They are just too powerful to mess with imo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although this may not be an issue yet at 19 years old, keep in mind that some homeowners insurance companies won't give you coverage if you own certain breeds of dogs, among them pit bulls. Just a concern for down the road.

 

 

And, many Apartments won't rent to people with Pits, Rotties, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pits are great dogs. BUT, like any powerful breed, they have to be socialized and well-trained. Like Hornblower said, the males MUST be neutered. Not just as a precautionary measure against aggression and unwanted mating, but the dog will be happier too.

 

I think it's sad that so many powerful breeds have been given such a bad reputation. Of course, you're not going to read about the many, many GOOD deeds these dogs have done. Everyone says the smaller breeds are safer, but that has not been my experience. I was bitten by a cocker spaniel. My Dh was bitten by a chihuahua. My great dane was attacked by a Jack russell. ALL of those dogs had one thing in common: bad owners who thought their actions were 'cute'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Socializing the pup is key. I would ignore the breed and focus on the dog. Bully breeds need a lot of good handling. I would highly recommend your ds work with a trainer. Our puppy classes were 100$ and worth every penny.

 

My ds was bitten by a basset hound.

Golden retrievers are apparently responsible for most bites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My sister worked in a vet clinic, and she loves all dog breeds, but she would never own a pit bull. We've heard so many stories of people saying "but he was such a nice dog, we socialized him, he was a great dog, never capable of doing this" as they slip the needle in to euthenize. These dogs have a history of just *snapping*, they just go nutzo and attack... yes, even the nice ones who have been socialized. They're walking time bombs as far as I'm concerned. The only thing predictable about this breed is it's unpredictability. If your son has one, fine, but I'd never let your 6yr old or any small child near that dog. Better safe than sorry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to say that ALL of the cases I've seen and heard where there was "no provocation" or "no warning" to attacks..there very much were warnings. People just didn't want to acknowledge them.

 

I think with any dog, that's true. However, young children don't know enough to recognize those signs and may even encourage the dog to attack by acting in an unusual way (from the dog's POV) - such as staring at the dog or being skittish and excited.

 

My step-brother has a pit bull mix who spent a good amount of time around my kids. She was fine, though she tried to play with them and playfully knocked them over once each - mostly because they weren't sure how to be around a big dog. I agree that they've gotten a bad rap. However, my understanding is that they can be more unpredictable than other breeds.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My family, growing up, had a personal friends who had a very sweet, female pitt bull. She was well trained, and had been with this family and with the kids in the family since she was a puppy (I think she was four or five) In fact - my dad - who never really trusted any dog, would comment on what a sweet dog she was.

But then she tore the face off their 6 year old son. No provocation. Parents were on the front porch watching the kids playing, pitt bull comes up, jumps on the kids, and rips him apart.

He died.

Sorry to be graphic - but this is not the only case I have heard of reagarding Pitts turning. I have also heard this about rottweilers, but don't know anyone personally.

I say - with so many other wonderful breeds out there, why take the chance?

 

I have heard and read the same thing quite a few times. No way would I allow my kids anywhere neat a pit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Socializing the pup is key. I would ignore the breed and focus on the dog. Bully breeds need a lot of good handling. I would highly recommend your ds work with a trainer. Our puppy classes were 100$ and worth every penny.

 

My ds was bitten by a basset hound.

Golden retrievers are apparently responsible for most bites.

 

But there is a huge difference between a bite from a golden retriever and a pit bull.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Although this may not be an issue yet at 19 years old, keep in mind that some homeowners insurance companies won't give you coverage if you own certain breeds of dogs, among them pit bulls. Just a concern for down the road.

 

I was going to point this out. Also, if he rents they might not be allowed. We allow dogs in the homes we rent but not pit bulls. We aren't willing to take the chance of being sued if the dog attacks someone. If they are allowed where he is right now, he should realize that they might not be allowed anywhere else he might want to move to in the future.

 

My sister has a pit bull. We don't go to her house, ever. They have to be careful walking around their house at night so they don't startle the dog, they have to call out to it. The problem I have is any dog will bite (just a fact) but pit bull bites are much worse because they hang on. My kids are around dogs but I will not let them be around pits.

Melissa

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another ex vet tech here. I would never recommend a pit' date=' rott, chow...especially if children are involved.[/quote']

 

My DH has a close friend that breeds chows and the dog sitting at my feet is part chow. She is a PITB (old, set in her ways), yes, but she is a GREAT protector. I could leave J outside and not worry about his safety. D's dogs are some of the most well behaved dogs I have ever met.

 

Rotties-OMG I would LOVE one! They are some of the biggest babies I have ever known! I know numerous families that have grown up with Rotties and never had a problem.

 

Our neighbor has a pit-she is better behaved than the labs and goldens! Walks every day and she knows who is boss-and that is not her. ;)

 

IF we would ever get another dog (and more than likely never will) we want a Rottie or a Dane. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As stated by others, with proper training/raising and socialisation, they are excellent dogs to have. This also requires responsible actions and common sense on the owner's part. My husband's uncle raised pits for security purposes (his dog's have actually been hired at junk yards and such in the past) and those dogs you didn't go near unless he was there and had introduced you to the dog (and then I was even leary), but that was because those dogs were TRAINED a certain way. I have three neighbours around me with a total of 7-8 pitbulls. All of these dogs are in family homes and I don't fear them. Granted, I also would not act stupid around two of the dogs as they are a bit more protective than the others, but with proper approach and introduction, I have been able to play with one of them. Another used to jump into our yard on a regular basis and we'd just pick him up (he was a pup at the time) and put him back over. He's since been trained to stay out of our yard.

 

I have been bit ONCE by a pit. We shared a divided house with a pit owner. I was coming around the house at night as they were arriving home and the daughter did not have the dog on the leash when getting out of the car. He just saw someone in the dark coming around the house. I simply backed myself up against a wall to keep from being knocked down, saw the dog coming, and he had just sunk his teeth into my foot (barely broke the skin with one tooth) when he realised who I was. He backed up and cowered very quickly. No harm was done (other than the owner could not come up with his shot records and she was required to board him until she moved out because he was now a liability to the landlord and dog bites HAVE to be reported. I got a tetanus).

 

So I've seen positive and negative sides. It really does depend on the owner and how they have raised the dog. Your kid may train the dog to be one person dog or they may socialise them for more people. As long as they act responsibly and have established authority with their dog, there should not be a problem. Pits usually do really well with their primary owner.

 

I personally would not have one because I know that *I* do not have the time to put into a pit and I have rambunctious children that need a pet with patience and wisdom to understand a child's stage and actions.

Edited by mommaduck
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We are dog lovers!! I absolutely have a soft spot where they're concerned, I'll pet a pit bull if they're sitting in a vet's waiting room...but I think it's a breed that has been bred for the wrong reasons and in my mind, no matter how much 'nurture' you put into them...their nature wins out in the end....tooo much evidence confirms this as a previous poster said...it's not fair to the dog or the human...they just don't mix...

 

There are more bites attributed to goldens because there are more golden retrievers than pit bulls...but the most deadly bites and severe injuries are the great majority attributed to these....not a ratio I want to look back on and say I 'didn't know'

 

Tara

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What ktgrok said.

 

Have a look at these myths here, on the Stop BSL site:

http://stopbsl.com/fortherecord/myths/

 

It covers all the usual issues & gives the facts.

 

funny-dog-pictures-young-picasso.jpg

 

Punish the deed, not the breed.

 

 

OH & statistically, what do the experts agree on about dog bites? Male, unneutered dogs are the biggest offenders.

Testosterone -----> aggression. Neuter.

And please spade the females. They can be just as or more protective than the males. Especially if they just had pups! This goes with any breed. My uncle had bred his Siberian Husky. NO ONE, except uncle, could enter the kitchen where she had her pups. She would have attacked.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As stated by others, with proper training/raising and socialisation, they are excellent dogs to have. This also requires responsible actions and common sense on the owner's part. My husband's uncle raised pits for security purposes (his dog's have actually been hired at junk yards and such in the past) and those dogs you didn't go near unless he was there and had introduced you to the dog (and then I was even leary), but that was because those dogs were TRAINED a certain way.

 

I cannot tell you how ILL this makes me.

 

It is a travesty.

 

Pitties were NEVER intended to have any aggression to people. DOGS, yes. They have a strong predisposition to dog aggression. There is not supposed to be any human aggression in this breed & to hear of someone breeding & training them this way is repellent.

 

Junkyard dogs? Good grief.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I cannot tell you how ILL this makes me.

 

It is a travesty.

 

Pitties were NEVER intended to have any aggression to people. DOGS, yes. They have a strong predisposition to dog aggression. There is not supposed to be any human aggression in this breed & to hear of someone breeding & training them this way is repellent.

 

Junkyard dogs? Good grief.

It was not uncommon in the 70's in areas that are very isolated. He's not breeding them anymore. He didn't train them to be aggressive, but did train them to be one person dogs (basically, they were only socialised with him). The dog worked nights with him and went home with him. German Shepards are trained by police and military K-9 units in much the same way. You would not just walk up to a GS from a K9U and expect it to be friendly.

 

And btw, it's not my cup of tea either. I prefer dogs socialised to be family dogs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

German Shepards are trained by police and military K-9 units in much the same way. You would not just walk up to a GS from a K9U and expect it to be friendly.

 

That is not the point of my argument. I owned gsd's (pb & I still have a mix now) & I know that breed very well. People who took pitties & made them into human aggressive guard dogs wrecked the breed - that's the point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The thing that I find most distrubing is that any dog can bite when provoked, but of the pitbull stories I've heard, there was no provocation whatsoever, no indication that this "lovely, socialized dog" would ever go nutzo and attack for no reason. It was always a surprise. Kind of scary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My mixes are GSD and Rottie-based, so I might have my own little bias!

 

Our neighbors have two Pitts and, frankly, they aren't the best-trained. Still, my own dogs got out about a month or so ago, and made a run for the Pitts, who were with their young (maybe 9 and 12) owners. I was terrified that the Pitts would (understandably) attack my dogs, but they never even barked - just turned tail and ran for home.

 

I'm definitely more afraid of poorly-trained "safe" dogs than I am of well-trained "scary" dogs. I won't let my kids play with my sister's little Kick Me dogs, but I volunteer them up as socialization tools for my in-laws' pb GSDs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That is not the point of my argument. I owned gsd's (pb & I still have a mix now) & I know that breed very well. People who took pitties & made them into human aggressive guard dogs wrecked the breed - that's the point.

So the GS breed has been wrecked also?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another issue to be aware of - and this applies to more than just pitts - dogs that are very protective - can be very dangerous.

If you have a dog that is protective of (as in the post about the Chow) a young child, it is very possible this dog could mistake the intentions of another child.

I have heard of (not seen personally) from my vet situations with protective breeds (rott, chow, pitt, german shepards, etc) in which the dog owner's child had a firend come over to play and for some reason tho dog thought it's child was in danger. One example was two boys wrestling and being silly. In this case - the rott grabbed the back of the friend's neck, ripped him away from "his child" and dragged the poor boy across the room screaming.

And yes - pitts are the ONLY breed that when well socialized and well nutured can still "turn" - and no - there does not need to be provocation. That 6 year old was YARDS away from the dog when it charged him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love love love pitties!!! I never thought I would say that, but my mother owns two that are absolute baby dolls. One of them is a white pit, and she is deaf. My mom has taught her to respond to sign language, no kidding. She is amazing. My mom has been great with their training. Both of them are fantastic with my girls, and I have no problem with my kids being around them. In fact, Nova (the deaf one) thinks my youngest is her person. It is so cute the way Nova stays right by her when she is there. Despite all the ear pulling, teeth examining, and "grooming", Nova loves my girl! Just like any dog, they must have the proper training and socialization! On another note, I also love Rotties! They are gorgeous animals, and I have known many loving and friendly ones (and one that wasn't, but it was poor training on the owner's part).

 

BTW, Hornblower, love the pic!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes due to our dog's protectivness and honestly I would place *any* dog either outside (if the children are in) or inside (if the children were out) because *any* dog can turn.

 

I had almost forgotten about what happened in my neighboorhood where I grew up. It was a small developement, about 20 houses so all of us knew each other fairly well. I was already in JH when the following happened, but my sister remebers it fairly well. Two dogs-a lab and a golden, out of nowhere attacked two of the children at the bus stop. The kiddos were in serious condition due to the maliciouness of the wounds. The dogs were put to sleep. Even dogs that are "kid friendly" can turn.

 

It is all about socialization and proper training.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And yes - pitts are the ONLY breed that when well socialized and well nutured can still "turn" - and no - there does not need to be provocation.

There was a story some years back of a "socialised" Pomeranian that killed an infant the grandmother/owner was babysitting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I previously owned a house we rented out, I allowed pets with prior authorization. This was put in so that no one could have a pit bull or certain other breeds living in our house. Our insurance doesn't cover pit bulls (and four other breeds which I listed in a post about half a year ago).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Both were/are very calm dogs. Our first was a rescue dog that had been fought and had the scars to prove it. He was fine with our 2 female dogs and our cats and horse but would go after other strange dogs. We had heard he had bitten a child but he never tried to bite our children (we had two babies while we had him) ever. We have had our current pit since she was 7 weeks old. The parents were on premises and were both beautifully behaved dogs. She is very nonaggressive and it was obvious even when we first saw her that she was that way. That being said, if our Jack Russell starts to play rough with her she can reciprocate. But if he yipps she lets go and backs off (he won't and will keep going back after her). We got the JR first and he's a good boy most of the time but we wouldn't have gotten him if we'd had her first. She is the perfect dog for us.

 

Having dogs is like having small children as long as they live. You have to pay attention to where they are, what they are doing, who they are doing it with, and give them lots of time to play and work off their energy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So the GS breed has been wrecked also?

 

GSD's are a more all purpose breed. They had a strong predisposition to guard property right from the beginning. They can also HERD sheep, which few people these days seem to realize ..... but guarding against intruders (animal or human) is within their original breed descriptors. They can be a more aloof and reserved breed with strangers.

 

Pitties should be no threat to humans at all - except their wiggly butts and tails might hurt your knees & the drool as they lick you might make your face sticky. They are not supposed to have any human aggression at all & they should be friendly to all, not just to one handler.

 

They are powerful dogs - people who used them to aggress against people have made this breed get the reputation it now has & that's sad. In the wrong hands, it can be a disaster.

 

BTW, the new fave breeds for young men with too much testosterone & not enough brains are Dogo Argentino & Fila Brasileiro. Filas have human aggression written into their breed standard, to the extent that judges are not to touch them in the ring. Hwvr, they do get disqualified if the handler cannot manage them in the ring...... :001_huh: gee, who would want to judge that group :confused:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

GSD's are a more all purpose breed. They had a strong predisposition to guard property right from the beginning. They can also HERD sheep, which few people these days seem to realize ..... but guarding against intruders (animal or human) is within their original breed descriptors. They can be a more aloof and reserved breed with strangers.

 

Pitties should be no threat to humans at all - except their wiggly butts and tails might hurt your knees & the drool as they lick you might make your face sticky. They are not supposed to have any human aggression at all & they should be friendly to all, not just to one handler.

 

They are powerful dogs - people who used them to aggress against people have made this breed get the reputation it now has & that's sad. In the wrong hands, it can be a disaster.

 

BTW, the new fave breeds for young men with too much testosterone & not enough brains are Dogo Argentino & Fila Brasileiro. Filas have human aggression written into their breed standard, to the extent that judges are not to touch them in the ring. Hwvr, they do get disqualified if the handler cannot manage them in the ring...... :001_huh: gee, who would want to judge that group :confused:

 

I can say this, he did NOT train them to be aggressive. In fact, he was against doing that. He did not, however, go out of his way to socialise them with other people as he WANTED them to be one-owner dogs. My grandparents dobermans were the same way. I would not have trusted them alone with children, but they were fine in the room with us as long as my grandmother was around. They just were not socialised to others in general. This wasn't abuse, nor was it training them to be aggressive. Merely creating a limited pack. They were very responsible owners. They themselves were not very sociable people. My grandmother really didn't like grandchildren, my grandfather lived in the middle of the desert, and the uncle never had children nor was a big fan of children (ironically, he did start coming by to see the kids for a bit towards the end of his life...I think he realised they were pretty much the only family he had left).

Edited by mommaduck
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I wouldn't ever ever ever own a pit.... although I'm sure...they can be decent dogs. BUT, last time Hornblower put this bit about pits, it's weird, I was out about town and started noticing the pits. It's not "in" to neuter pits, I guess!! I counted maybe 5 or so.... and they all looked well endowed!

 

Walking around town, when you're 19... seems to be in style... with an unneutered pit. UGH.... BUT, at some point those huge chains they have around their necks.... are being clung onto by some precious 3 year old...

 

SO.... I'm sure a ton of it is the training... and the not wanting a neutered pit.

 

:(

 

His is female.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...