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How many books is too many?


fhjmom
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Why can't programs like Singapore just put everything in one stinkin' book?:tongue_smilie:

 

For each level, you are looking at the following, just for one half of the year:

 

  • textbook
  • workbook
  • intensive practice
  • extra practice
  • challenging word problems
  • tests
  • home instructor's guide/teacher's manual

We don't even have the word problems or the intensive practice and the amount of different books is about to drive me over the edge. Just sayin'.

 

(I realize I don't have to use them all. It's not the material that doesn't work - I really like Singapore - it's how the material is packaged. I would love to use the word problems but I am having trouble with the idea of adding any more books to our mountain of math! LOL! My 1st grader devours math books, she loves it, so any extra material to slow her down and think it through a little deeper is a good thing. That is what prompted this post; I feel like I should order her the word problems but I don't wanna!)

Edited by fhjmom
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Because it's in publishers' interest to make you buy eight books instead of one.

 

:lol: That is exactly what I was thinking. If they put it all in one book it would be $$$. This was they are cheap enough individually that they are hoping you don't think about how much it all adds up to.

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:lol: That is exactly what I was thinking. If they put it all in one book it would be $$$. This was they are cheap enough individually that they are hoping you don't think about how much it all adds up to.

I wasn't kidding the least. I have some connections in the publishing world (European though, but which does deal with textbooks and all additional materials) - it's exactly how the reasoning goes, and it's been really crossing all lines in the recent decade or two. Have you also noticed this common practice of making books impossible to reuse by making kids cut stuff from inside or write straight into the textbook? Same thing.

 

IMO, two books are always a perfect solution: a textbook (as dense as possible and with as little distractions as possible) plus ONE workbook which contains all types of exercises. Textbook should be able to be used by multiple persons, while ONE additional workbook per child is an additional expense.

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I am pretty sure there are both extra practice and intensive practice books :D

 

Extra practice are more problems at the same level, intensive practice are harder than the workbook.:tongue_smilie:

 

Ahhh, you are correct! We are using the Standards Edition which doesn't have the Intensive Practice (according to what I could find on the Singapore website), but it looks like the US Edition does have both. Off to edit again! (And increase the number of books even more!)

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I wasn't kidding the least. I have some connections in the publishing world (European though, but which does deal with textbooks and all additional materials) - it's exactly how the reasoning goes, and it's been really crossing all lines in the recent decade or two. Have you also noticed this common practice of making books impossible to reuse by making kids cut stuff from inside or write straight into the textbook? Same thing.

 

IMO, two books are always a perfect solution: a textbook (as dense as possible and with as little distractions as possible) plus ONE workbook which contains all types of exercises. Textbook should be able to be used by multiple persons, while ONE additional workbook per child is an additional expense.

 

I didn't think you were. I guess I was using the rolling smilie more like "crazy" than "laughing". And I do think it is crazy, but true.

 

I agree with the two book solution. I don't get why the extra practice, intensive, practice and word problems are all separate. Although that would still mean a additional test booklet and teacher's guide, but that is much more realistic IMHO.

 

Oh and all the little cutting stuff up is the biggest reason why I *hated* Singapore Earlybird K. Littlest will be using Essentials. Plus Essentials is *ONE* book! Gotta love that! (We used Essentials A and EB B with older DD so I got a taste of both.)

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  • textbook
  • workbook
  • intensive practice
  • extra practice
  • challenging word problems
  • tests
  • home instructor's guide/teacher's manual

 

I like the way Singapore is structured; it allows the program to be tailored to meet the needs of individual children. Not all kids need Extra Practice, and not all kids and handle the Intensive Practice books. The core program is the HIG+text+workbook; however, IMHO CWP should be added in as a supplement no matter which program one is using. Does anyone use the tests? I wouldn't think they'd be needed in a homeschooling situation.

Edited by nmoira
missed word
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We are using the tests this year. This is our first year HSing and I am using it as a "pre-test" book to find out where her gaps are. If she can show me that she is proficient and can expain her thinking that brought her to the correct answer, we are skipping that material in the text/workbook combo.

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I like the way Singapore is structured; it allows the program to be tailored to meet the needs of individual children. Not all kids need Extra Practice, and not all kids and handle the Intensive Practice books. The core program is the HIG+text+workbook; however, IMHO CWP should be added in as a supplement no matter which program one is using. Does anyone use the tests? I wouldn't think they'd be needed in a homeschooling situation.
It seems to me it would be even easier to tailor the program if you had all the options in one package. You could use the parts you needed, or even part of the parts, and skip the others. It would be so much easier to add in an IP practice problem or two every now and then for students who might not be up to it all the time if it was already included, whereas a child that typically doesn't "handle" the IP problems would never get any exposure at all the way it is now because it would be hard to justify buying the IP book to use for just a problem here and there.

 

I use the tests for pretty much all my curriculum. One reason is my oldest tends to freak out about tests and I want to "de-sensitize" him. He also is one that makes careless mistakes so I want him to get in the practice of checking answers and fixing mistakes when Mom isn't looking over his shoulder and helping. He tends to take the tests a little more seriously in that regard. It shows me if her really gets it and can do the problems on his own.

 

Full disclosure: I am a former public-school teacher so I do tend to lean a little more towards some traditional school ideals, although I have jumped ship in some ways, too.

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