Jump to content

Menu

Reluctant to give my daughter all this medicine.


Recommended Posts

My 10yo has struggled with croup and croup-like asthma since she was a baby. Pretty much every cold would go into croup. I remember a few winters when she'd literally go from croup to breathing treatments to croup again all winter long. One winter we resorted to steroids. We've had a system down over the last few years and every time she would even sound remotely croupy I'd get her into the shower, etc. So we've managed to not have to deal with breathing treatments for about 2 years.

 

Fast forward. My daughter (who has also been going through puberty if that changes anything) has been sick a TON this past year and complaining of chest pain with just about every cold/allergy/bad air day. So today after almost 2 weeks of cold symptoms & fatigue, I took her to the doctor. Doctor's diagnosis was sinus infection/bronchitis and possible asthma. She looked at her ears, nose, throat and listened to her breath.

 

She ordered an immediate breathing treatment in office which was completed and listened to her breath again.

 

She prescribed 2-3 months of Flovent (88mg 2x a day) as a maintenance medication, 2 weeks of Xopenex as rescue mediation, and a z-pack of antibiotics. She said if my daughter had ANY symptoms two weeks from now, I was to call back.

 

Does this sound okay? Frankly, I feel like the doctor threw everything but the kitchen sink at her. I guess when she was little they just did the breathing treatments so I'm not really sure what to think of all this STUFF.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think those drugs are pretty standard for the symptoms you describe. You've got Flovent for inflammation, antibiotics for infection, and a rescue inhaler if she needs it. So if she doesn't need it she's only taking two medicines.

 

You don't want to let asthma symptoms persist as doing so can permanently impair lung function.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Okay, ladies. Thank you. Guess it just came as a surprise to me. We don't usually have to deal with so much medication at one time. Reading all the paperwork with them was enough to make me go...:eek::ohmy::scared:

Edited by Daisy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would have even sounded right if he'd prescribed the zoponex for regular use until she's cleared up.

 

It went against my grain to use so many asthma drugs but what I found is that medicating heavily up front when symptoms appeared actually cut back on the amount of meds needed in the long run. Even moreso when I learned to medicate at the onset of colds as a preventative measure because that's when my flareups almost always happened.

 

It's counterintuitive, but when it comes to asthma I always say drug early, drug often. :001_huh:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yep, those drugs are fine. Not extreme at all. I probably would have asked for a stronger antibiotic, but the Z-pack might do the trick. I've just seen better results on other drugs with stubborn/repeat sinus infections. And, please do go back in two weeks if you need to....it's not something to mess around with.

 

Diane W.

married for 22 years

homeschooling 3 kiddos for 16 years

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It would have even sounded right if he'd prescribed the zoponex for regular use until she's cleared up.

 

It went against my grain to use so many asthma drugs but what I found is that medicating heavily up front when symptoms appeared actually cut back on the amount of meds needed in the long run. Even moreso when I learned to medicate at the onset of colds as a preventative measure because that's when my flareups almost always happened.

 

It's counterintuitive, but when it comes to asthma I always say drug early, drug often. :001_huh:

 

They did prescribe the xopenex for regular use for the next two weeks.

 

Basically she does the following daily...

 

2 puffs of Flovent 2x a day (once in morning and once at night)

The z-pack for the next 5 days.

Xopenex is 3x a day for the next 2 weeks, than as needed after that.

 

So I guess that sounds pretty normal. I wish I had taken her in earlier. She has been complaining of chest pain and saying she is tired SO MUCH. I think I just reached a point where I wrote it off as tweeny melodrama (we've had a lot of that lately). :blushing::(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. Sounds like what my asthmatic gets when he gets a flare up. When you do go back in - ask about a peak flow meter. You can measure her breathing scores daily and can pick up on an illness very early and can treat appropriately. We have an asthma plan. If his score goes down to below 10% of his normal, we treat with X. If it drops to 20% below, we do something else. Etc. Etc.

:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug: I remember that appointment where LOTS of drugs were thrown our way. It was tough!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree. Sounds like what my asthmatic gets when he gets a flare up. When you do go back in - ask about a peak flow meter. You can measure her breathing scores daily and can pick up on an illness very early and can treat appropriately. We have an asthma plan. If his score goes down to below 10% of his normal, we treat with X. If it drops to 20% below, we do something else. Etc. Etc.

:grouphug::grouphug::grouphug: I remember that appointment where LOTS of drugs were thrown our way. It was tough!!!

 

:iagree::iagree::iagree:

STrongly agree, learn to use and chart the use of a peak flow monitor. We did this for ds for several years when he was around 7-9, and it helped keep him healthy. It took a while for everything to even out.

 

Also, is she using a spacer with her asthma inhaler?--helps to get the meds deep and not at the back of the throat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, how reluctant I was to start on the regular, daily asthma meds, but oh how it has revolutionized our lives. I have 2 who would get sick a lot, and once on regular meds they are mostly healthy. They do advair, and hardly ever need the xopenex, and maybe only have 2 illnesses a winter, as opposed to sick all of the winter. I've been told that maintaining them this way is much healthier than having to treat multiple bronchitis' each season.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you, everyone.

 

I hope she does start feeling better soon.

 

Ten minutes ago she was crying because her chest hurts after taking the deep breath on the inhaler. I think she is just really sick and clingy. She's needing a lot of hugs.

 

She hates medicine of any kind, which is why I usually try to avoid it (I'm careful not to say anything negative about medication in front of her). She tends to blame the medicine for the way she feels instead of recognizing that EVENTUALLY it will make her feel better. Doesn't help that her Dad just went through MAJOR neck surgery and was refusing pain meds within three days (two peas in a pod!).

 

Anyway, thank you again. Time for a scoop of mint chip ice cream.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I only read your first post but wanted to share.

 

My dh doesn't have asthma, but he DOES get asthma which is secondary to an infection. I forget the name of it. Every Single Year he will get a cold and it will turn into bronchitis or pneumonia, and then he'll be wheezing and having a hard time breathing He'll be put on antiobiotics, sometimes steroids, and of course the inhalers. The last time he was on his inhalers longer than anytime before. I want to say it was nearly six months!!!

 

Anyway, I had heard that oil of oregano was wonderful for upper respiratory issues and I thought we'd give it a try. You're supposed to take this at the first sign of any upper respiratory symptom. When dh did get sick last winter, he took it right away. It was the first winter in many, many years that he didn't need treatment of ANY kind!!!

 

Once your daughter is well, it certainly couldn't hurt to try it. It supposedly burns as it's going down so I got gel capsules for dh. He didn't feel anything at all but did burp the stuff up. :001_smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think those drugs are pretty standard for the symptoms you describe. You've got Flovent for inflammation, antibiotics for infection, and a rescue inhaler if she needs it. So if she doesn't need it she's only taking two medicines.

 

You don't want to let asthma symptoms persist as doing so can permanently impair lung function.

 

I agree. My son was not thoroughly treated when he had such symptoms and he only has 74% lung function. That's permanent damage that will never improve.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was so reluctant to do the Flovent with dd6 but it has made her life better. Before she went on it, we had a really scary round of pneumonia with her that went from a cold to pneumonia in a matter of days. Since she went on the Flovent, she has barely even gotten sick. We also had Xoponex daily for a little while when she was sick at the beginning and a round of oral Predisone for her but she does so much better on the meds. She hates it too but I enforce it because it know it outweighs the alternatives for her.

 

I hope your dd feels better soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

that is the standard med routine for asthma.

 

 

 

that said, it is not the only possible means of treatment. please don't take this as any sort of medical ADVICE - just offering the knowledge that there are other alternatives available. Alternatives that we personally have found very very effective.

 

My son spent a few days in the PICU almost 2 years ago thanks to his first asthma attack. We did the prednisone for a week and the albuterol treatments round the clock for the first few weeks. Then a friend talked to us about how she manages her son's asthma naturally. I was happy to look into natural means to control the asthma, cuz I am not comfortable with long term steriod use. It is easy for lungs to become dependent upon the steriods, and I would personally rather heal my child's lungs via alternative medicine.

 

I looked into it and we started working out a great natural program for him with our acupunturist and our chiropractor. And then once it program was established and working well, we slowly weaned him off the last of the nebs. We did leave the PICU with a script for a daily steriod inhaler, but I never filled it. And the pred was only for a week, so it was just weaning him off the nebs - which we could not manage until we started the other stuff. Before adding the natural stuff, he was getting nebs every 4 hours round the clock. Period. I was setting an alarm and waking up in the night to make sure we didn't go past the 4 hour mark or he would wake up gasping and wheezing and totally unable to breath and we'd have to do a back to back double dose to get it sort of under control again. Slowly I spaced it to every 6 hours, then to 8 hours, then just in the am and at bed, then just at bed....until finally we were using the natural stuff only (3-4 times a day initially).

 

He takes a homeopathic asthma med twice a day as prevention, and it can be used a a rescue med too - alone or with albuterol or xopenex. We use a good quality omega complex help reduce inflammation and prevent more attacks. We also have a great herbal allergy/asthma med that he can take daily during our "rough" season. He took it twice daily for a while initially. A lack of calcium/magnesium can cause asthma issues also, so we boosted his calcium/mag supplements to be a good ratio and amount.

 

He has had several major asthma flare ups since his first hospitalization - most of which during that first 6 months - and especially bad when sick with some sort of head/chest cold. But extreme temps do it too. and exertion too. or allergen exposure.... the first few months were hard, but got dramatically better once we weaned off the standard meds....

 

Since then, any flares up, we treated primarily naturally and with a trip to the chiro. Sounds crazy - but we have done a natural and/or neb treatment and then rushed him to the chiro during an attack (while dosing him with the homeo and/or inhalers on the way f necessary) and after being adjusted the attack immediately STOPS. His breathing goes from 60s to midh-high 20s. And then stays there. We won't hestitate to use the nebs or inhaler if he is not responding to the natural stuff, but it definitely is not our first line of defense any more. I honestly can't even remember the last time we had to use either or even rush him to get adjusted. Usually a few quick doses of the homeopathic stuff will kick the wheezing right out. follow up with a trip to the chiro and his lungs are awesome again.

 

It is incredibly rare for us to resort to nebs or inhalers any more, like I said it has been about a year since we used either. And whats even better - thru all the natural stuff, his immune system and his lung function has gotten soooo much better! Before he would be puffing after 10 minutes on the playground, now he can run around for hours or swim the length of the pool easily.

 

Also - You may want to pull dairy from her diet and see what happens. Dairy allergy/intolerance is linked to nasal allergies and asthma - it also increases mucus production. Food intolerances can be a major underlying cause of asthma, and pulling the offending foods from the diet can be an easy way to manage the symptoms. either way, the extra mucus will just make things worse durng a flare up....

 

Invest in a decent steth. and listen to her lungs. You will hear the wheezing "squeek" when she breathes - You will be able to listen and hear it throughout the lungs - it is just up top or throughout the lung fields? By listening to her lungs when you suspect she may have a problem (like when she is sick), you can catch it and treat it earlier that way...and monitor whether the nebs, etc are actually working or not. Or know that her lungs are just fine and you are jumping the gun on it. I have one steth that I keep for home, in addition to my work one. I actually keep my better one at home cuz of DS's asthma.

 

Anyways, I know this is not the mainstream treatment, but just wanted to share a little bit of what has really worked for us. Especially since you seem really reluctant to use the routine meds. I hope you figure out something that you are comfortable with and that helps your daughter. Hope she starts to feel better soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Have you ever had her checked by a chiropractor? They may be able to reduce the problems, if they can't clear it all up. Less drugs would be better than more drugs.

 

Rosie

 

:iagree: After years of allergy shots, most of my allergy related problems were gone except asthma flareups during colds and those were stubbornly holding out. A few years ago I started seeing a chiropractor for neck and back pain and when she told me most of her asthma patients reported feeling better after 3 months or so I did a mental "Oh yeah, right." but she was right. Not only did it knock out most of the remaining asthma, I went from having frequent colds to about 2 puny colds per year.

 

It wouldn't be surprising if she's feeling pain/discomfort after having the PFT tests and using inhalers on already raw feeling air pathways. A nebulizer (like the breathing treatment she had in the office) might be easier on her when she's flared up. Did he offer that?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Xopenex is for the nebulizer. I wish they had given me the Flovent for a nebulizer. Then I could have just done them both that way.

 

You know I hate to almost say this but I've never noticed any kind of health improvement from my children going to the chiro. They went every single week from the time they were newborn until my daughter was eight years old (which would have made my son 6yo). We finally stopped due to our insurance changing their policy. Who knows though. Maybe they would have had worse problems if they had not gone?

 

We did pay for my husband to go while he was dealing with severe neck pain (ruptured discs) and it did help him manage his pain.

 

So while not anti-chiro, I guess I just personally never experienced the benefits of going to one.

 

I'm also not anti-alternative meds, but unfortunately we've been trying some of those types of things. I thought they were working okay up until the last year, but now she just can't get on top of it. I feel badly for her.

 

She said this morning, "Mom taking deep breathes while doing the treatment hurts. I don't like it."

 

I said, "Just take normal deep breathes. Don't do it too deeply."

 

Her reply? "I NEVER take deep breathes because it always hurts."

 

Sigh. I think maybe she has just gotten used to diminished lung capacity.

 

It also doesn't help that we live in a city with some of the worst air pollution in the country. We regularly have red air days where even healthy people shouldn't be going outside.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...