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reading with comprehension


vlgimmelli
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My son is 11 and still struggles with his reading and words, but especially with the comprehension. Is there a good reading program that stresses comprehension that you would recommend for a curriculum to help my son raise his grade level in reading and also to raise his ability to know what he is reading? thanks

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My son is 11 and still struggles with his reading and words, but especially with the comprehension. Is there a good reading program that stresses comprehension that you would recommend for a curriculum to help my son raise his grade level in reading and also to raise his ability to know what he is reading? thanks

 

Have you had him evaluated for learning disorders? If you haven't, this might be pertinent since he's eleven. The level of reading skill required of 6-12th graders is remarkably more difficult. Comprehension problems will often show up during this time frame.

 

Most reading comprehension curriculae do not teach comprehension...they only practice it. Some kids need to be taught the subskills needed in the reading comprehension process.

 

Check out this webpage. I don't use this curriculum, but am using Verbalize and Visualize by Lindamood Bell which is very similar. This webpage breaks down the reading comprehension process well.

 

We chose to have our son tested and a diagnosis of auditory processing disorder was confirmed. Before we had him tested we were pretty much shooting in the dark in trying to help him. Now, after having him tested, we know the exact skills that need to be strengthened.

 

I hope this helps.

 

(By the way, Reading Detective was great practice, but it does not teach comprehension. It is a practice book. We also used More Comprehension in Varied Subject Matter by EPS. I love that series...but again, they are practice books. Not instruction.)

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Have you had him evaluated for learning disorders? If you haven't, this might be pertinent since he's eleven. The level of reading skill required of 6-12th graders is remarkably more difficult. Comprehension problems will often show up during this time frame.

 

Most reading comprehension curriculae do not teach comprehension...they only practice it. Some kids need to be taught the subskills needed in the reading comprehension process.

 

Check out this webpage. I don't use this curriculum, but am using Verbalize and Visualize by Lindamood Bell which is very similar. This webpage breaks down the reading comprehension process well.

 

We chose to have our son tested and a diagnosis of auditory processing disorder was confirmed. Before we had him tested we were pretty much shooting in the dark in trying to help him. Now, after having him tested, we know the exact skills that need to be strengthened.

 

I hope this helps.

 

(By the way, Reading Detective was great practice, but it does not teach comprehension. It is a practice book. We also used More Comprehension in Varied Subject Matter by EPS. I love that series...but again, they are practice books. Not instruction.)

 

Sorry to hijack, but where would someone get this kind of testing done? I have a just turned 8 ds who I'm thinking might have some sort of reading problem. He can sound the words out fine, no trouble with phonics, but seems to struggle with tracking a little bit and has poor comprehension skills.

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Dh did his graduate work in remediating reading skills. He shared a lot of his research with me, and I was surprised to see that the biggest factor in reading comprehension was actually background knowledge. If he is reading about an unfamiliar subject, you might discuss any new concepts or vocabulary before he starts reading.

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I located a LindaMood Bell center and for me it is too expensive, I wish I had the finances to send my son there.

 

I use the Lindamood Bell curriculum at home. I purchased the materials used on Ebay at a very reasonable price. I read the manual twice through, made sure I understood completely and began teaching. It's gone well.

 

LD testing can be done through your local school system. However, the testing they give can sometimes fall short. (Standardized norms are the culprit.) You know your child best. If you know something isn't right, then you must be your child's advocate. Don't give up.

 

We went to our pediatrician and followed the following sequence:

 

Eye exam with pediatric ophthalmologist

Hearing exam with a licensed audiologist (call your local hospital)

 

(The above tests are often covered by insurance because physical ailments/deformities are being ruled out.)

 

Based on those evaluations, you will be referred as necessary.

 

If you can't afford testing, I would go through the school system. You might get lucky and have test results that show the problem clearly. The more information you have, the better.

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You might want to look at Reading Detective. It is published by The Critical Thinking Co. It has kids actually "prove" the correctness of their answer by finding the appropriate sentence(s) in the original text.

 

Also, I have high hopes for the Jr. Great Books program. We just got this for this year. I've only just started it, but we plan to spend several sessions on each story, so I really think it will help a lot.

 

hth!

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With most of my remedial students, their comprehension has automatically come along when they learn to decode 100% of what they read accurately and quickly--which just takes work overlearning phonics and the phonetic rules of our language.

 

Here are some tests to determine where his skills are, I would give the NRRF reading grade level test, the MWIA, and the New Elizabethian Test:

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/readinggradeleve.html

 

And, here is the program I work through with my remedial students in conjunction with having them watch my free online lessons (online phonics lessons linked below.)

 

http://www.thephonicspage.org/On%20Reading/howtotutor.html

 

If he got sight words along the way, he'll need a lot of nonsense words.

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Thanks Elizabeth, I will give it a try with my son. Thanks Again. Have a great day.

 

You're welcome! If you have more questions, let me know.

 

I just read your post on the special needs board, you might want to try having him do his phonics work in cursive. Don Potter feels his students with ADD tendencies are helped by cursive, and that well taught cursive helps them focus.

 

It might be something about holding the pencil and deliberately copying/working in a specific order, I recently read in my "Drawing With Children" book that the author had several ADD kids who improved their focusing abilities by doing the drawing exercises in her book.

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