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I am a private tutor (my specialty is advanced math and science, as well as scientific writing) and have set costs for tutoring and editing. However, someone asked me if I would be interested in expanding into the homeschool market to be a private tutor who teaches the whole class to a child. For example, someone is uncomfortable with Algebra, so I would come in teach their child Algebra. How much would you charge for this or be willing to pay?

 

Just so you know, in my area, I get $55 per hour for elementary, middle and high school; $75 for college; $100 for graduate-level work. That would work out to almost $3000 per semester for 1 high school course if I went 3hrs per week which seems crazy to me....not that I wouldn't take it if someone offered ;)

 

Also, kind of as an aside, do you think it is worth it for a private tutor to maintain a website/blog with price lists, discounts, etc. or just to depend on business cards and word of mouth.

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I use private tutors at time and I always discuss their fees in this way: If they want to charge $55 an hour, I will use them (if they're great), but infrequently. If they want to have regular work with me we have to work out a rate that makes sense over a period of time.

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I think it would depend on how reliable your workload is at the $75/hr rate. If you know you can get as many hours as you want that way, why bother lowering your rates to do a whole course?

 

OTOH, if you can only get 1 - 2 hours per week, or very sporadically, the trade-off between price per hour and reliable income might be worth it.

 

FWIW, I paid $45/hr for a few weeks, three times a week, for German tutoring before dd went to Switzerland for a 7th grade. I would not do that for an entire year-long course.

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How much would you charge for this or be willing to pay?

First I would ask you what are your qualifications (BA, MA, PhD?) and where obtained, what exactly did you study, to see whether you're qualified to teach what you teach. I might work with great self-taught experts, or people whose academic qualifications are in related fields, but I prefer somebody with a formal qualification, especially if it's an "anonymous" person (not somebody I've heard about) or somebody I have no previous experience with.

 

$55 per hour is not even that expensive in my book (I charge more on all levels :tongue_smilie:) if you're an expert, but if it were an entire class rather than just an occasional tutoring, it might amount to sums I wouldn't be willing to pay to cater to my DC's laziness (I doubt I would ever pay for somebody to teach them the whole course which they can learn from a book... it's not music or a language for them to need to have somebody next to them to hear them).

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First I would ask you what are your qualifications (BA, MA, PhD?) and where obtained, what exactly did you study, to see whether you're qualified to teach what you teach.

 

 

Sorry I should have mentioned that - I am on hiatus from writing my dissertation. My undergrad degrees are Canadian and my graduate degrees and work are from a research university in the U.S. I have degrees in biological anthropology (stats, biology, genetics) with a specialty in population genetics, archaeology (with a honours sub specialty in primatology and gender), and am 2 courses short of an MBA. I also a minor in art history.

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We hired a reading specialist to work with our son. She had one rate for occassional tutoring and assessment. She had another for people willing to commit to a long term full course of a subject. We pay about $10 less an hour than someone who goes for once a week or occassional tutoring. We signed a contract committing to 4 days per week and we have to pay for the entire month in advance. Written in the contract is how holidays are handled (same as public school with the exception of summer, then vacations and national holidays are the days off). We do pay the same every month, even school holidays, since she took the total cost of our commitment and divided it by the number of months we committed to. That way we could better budget.

 

Also in the contract are how missed days are handled - essentially we have to schedule them with in a reasonable time. If we don't there is no refund.

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I teach small group classes and also do private tutoring online (high school Math Pre-Algebra , Algebra 1, Geometry and Algebra 2).

 

I'm a very experienced Math teacher... as far as high school level teachers go--the higher your degree DOES NOT MEAN that you are a better teacher--usually it is the opposite--as the higher your degree level the further removed you are from HOW YOU LEARNED... just my observations...

 

I'm dirt cheap when it comes to private tutoring... this is because I'm selective on who I take--and I like challenges as well as students who really want to learn. It is enjoyable for me!

 

When I priced my small group classes I considered my competition. There are MANY online math class options. Also, many community colleges allow high school students to take courses there-- so I also considered what the CC tution would be.

 

While I'd like to think of myself as 'worthy' of $75 per hour--this is just NOT REASONABLE in my area... unless I want to deal with only rich families. BTDT $15-$25 per hour is the going rate for private tutoring around here.

 

I can charge a REASONABLE rate of $7.50 per lesson--$30 per month (meeting once per week) with a small group of 6 students and that comes to $45 per hour. I also allow my students to e-mail me anytime with questions--so that rate goes down a bit when you figure the outside of class time in. The per-course rate is $240... so I'm competitive.

 

I would have VERY FEW clients if I charged $60 per month (working towards $90 per hour IF I could get 6 students to commit to that rate)... $480 for a high school math course is a bit steep (not figuring in text costs).

 

I also use a curriculum that is designed for block scheduling--so I can be efficient in teaching the whole lesson in one session per week.. it is DIFFICULT to schedule a group of homeschoolers more than one day per week!

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Sorry I should have mentioned that - I am on hiatus from writing my dissertation. My undergrad degrees are Canadian and my graduate degrees and work are from a research university in the U.S. I have degrees in biological anthropology (stats, biology, genetics) with a specialty in population genetics, archaeology (with a honours sub specialty in primatology and gender), and am 2 courses short of an MBA. I also a minor in art history.

Yes, you can request those prices with those qualifications. :)

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the higher your degree DOES NOT MEAN that you are a better teacher--usually it is the opposite--as the higher your degree level the further removed you are from HOW YOU LEARNED... just my observations...

You know, it really depends. There are experts who can't teach, but there are certainly those that can.

 

The reason why I asked about the degree is because I personally am not inclined to allow amateurs teach my children if I have a choice of something better. They might be great amateurs, but there is something about the structure of the university preparation that I respect. Somebody who knows mathematics, as a particular way of thinking, will be able to apply it to algebra even if their last encounter with it was in their own middle school, and they will also be able to provide my children with much better insights than somebody who knows only algebra very well, but hasn't studied mathematics as a field (or a related field).

 

This is especially true for languages. Ideally, you're taught by a native speaker that has a university degree in their own language and has had some classes on second language acquisition: that way you get the best of both world, both the native intuition and the ability to dissect the language analytically, transmit culture and literacy, and teach it as foreign to somebody who is new to it. Most of language tutors miss one of the two components, though they are excellent non-native tutors as well. I'd never send my child ONLY to somebody who is a native and clueless about how their own language works (for oral practice, yes, but actual teaching - no), nor to somebody who "took it in college" since those people are going to transfer a lot of mistakes onto the kid.

 

Also, a university degree is not only a more formal guarantee of expertise (and yes, I agree that there are people who manage to graduate almost clueless... but the chances are still somewhat less, somebody still guarantees for them), but also a living proof that somebody took care to actually study themselves that which they tutor, or a very related field. This is important IMO. I want somebody who invested time and effort in their knowledge around my kids - and I'm willing to pay some extra bucks for such a person, even if they're going to teach the same content as somebody else.

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