Jump to content

Menu

Wordly Wise


Wyndie
 Share

Recommended Posts

My dd8 just finished Learning RX, a remediated reading program. She tested out as having age appropriate reading skills but 15 year old word attack skills (meaning she can decode really hard words with ease but needs practice with fluency). Her instructor recommended Wordly Wise for her to follow up with this year. I know nothing about it except what I saw on their site.

 

If you use WW, what do you like, what do you not like, is it hard/easy? And if I get it, what all do I need? Just the student text or teachers guide too? I don't like getting books I can't lay my hands on and their site doesn't give me enough information...or I'm just not "getting" their site maybe. :glare:

 

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am using Wordly Wise 3 this year. I used the K edition last year and it was way too easy for DS so I skipped ahead a bit since DS is reading and comprehending on a 6th grade level. WW3 is hard. I would be very surprised if most 8 year olds (3rd graders) would have a grasp of the words/definitions. Maybe I am wrong, but a friend of mine saw the book and said her 5th grader wouldn't know the words.

 

DS is enjoying it, but I am coming up with games to help him learn the definitions.

 

You do not need the teacher's manual. Each exercise is self-explanatory.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you! I was going to ask what grade level to start her at as well. I guess if I go that direction, at least I can buy a few of the books inexpensively since I don't need a TM. I'll probably start at a younger level so she's not frustrated and work up from there. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My kids do WW. My dd finds it challenging at grade level. My ds is using it a grade level ahead and thinks its the easiest most fun part of his day:001_huh:. If your daughter is below level on reading, I'd go at least a level below grade level to start.

 

That said, I'm not really sure these books will help with what she needs. They may help her with specific vocabulary, but wouldn't you be better off working on her phonics or decoding skills?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you're looking for ways to increase fluency there are a couple of things you can do. There are programs that specifically target this skill. The Six Minute Solution and Read Naturally are two that I know about. In these programs, you have leveled passages and the child reads them several times to increase her speed. The idea is to increase the cold read speed over time.

 

The other thing you can do is to just have her read aloud to you for 20-30 minutes daily (you may have to build up to this). Start with books that are way below her instructional reading level, books that she can read aloud fluently. Gradually, over the span of maybe a year, increase the reading level until she is reading fluently at her instructional level. This seems simple, but it had a very profound effect on my son's reading. It's more fun than the fluency programs because you can pick books that she enjoys. I used series (like Magic Tree House or the Littles) because the reading level is usually the same throughout.

 

WW doesn't work on reading fluency, but there is a spelling program called Megawords that includes some fluency work. It happens to come from the same company as WW, so maybe that is what the instructor was thinking of.

 

Good luck with this. It sounds like your daughter has done some good work already. Also, if you post on the Special Needs board you're sure to get some excellent advice. My 14yo son can read well today because of the advice I received there many years ago.

Edited by EKS
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We've been doing the read alouds daily. They're ones that the parent reads the intro and the child reads the rest but I'm not loving them so far. I'll just let her pick something light and fun to build up fluency; I just really struggle to know what is challenging and what is frustrating. I'd like to be able to judge that for myself before she gets into a book and melts down but I imagine I'll learn quickly enough. :tongue_smilie:

 

Our instructor previously worked as a school teacher and found WW to be great for her students, that's why she recommended it. This instructor thinks very much like my dd (all the way down to being a left-handed kinetic learner) so I wanted to seriously consider her suggestions, but it seems that WW is not what we're really looking for.

 

Thank you for your help! I'll go post on the Special Needs board.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...