Jump to content

Menu

Recommended Posts

It came a few months ago when I was reading a book on Paganism (my religion). The author made the case for Paganism being a worldview of it's own, quoting the German philosopher who coined the term. That set my gears spinning, but this week's conversations with my children have put a log on the fire. (The totally analogy here is steam train. Just sayin'.) I want to teach it more intentionally.

 

Is there anyone else out there trying to teach worldview without the Christian materials available? Or maybe using them but coming from a non-Christian perspective?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like your analogy :D

 

Not entirely clear what you're asking, though; what constitutes intentional teaching of worldview? Are you referring to bringing children up as Pagans, or more to presenting other subjects through a Pagan lens? Or?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Honestly, I'm not even sure what that means. :blush: We just talk about things as they come up. Any time the subject of religion comes up, we talk about it from an objective point of view. I have always shown the kids that every religion deserves respect whether it's a personal belief of ours or not.

 

But what do you mean by teaching worldview?

Link to post
Share on other sites

We all teach our children a worldview whether we intend to or not, whether we are religious or not, and with no regard for our location on planet earth. We teach it when our behavior demonstrates to our children what we find meaningful and worth pursuing, what our priorities are, who we like and dislike, what we like and dislike...these are all part of our worldview. This creates a family culture--a lens--through which we teach our children to look through.

 

Some people build a really big lens for their children, while others do not.

 

Is this what you mean?

 

We have been gradually taking our children away from a Christian worldview and leading them into a "critical thinking" worldview* and a humanistic worldview. If they choose religion, at least it will be (hopefully!) founded upon 1) something other than faith alone, and 2) humanism's beliefs in the human capability for goodness and the importance of loving service of others.

 

Did I answer your question? :)

 

-------------

*For example, a common refrain in our home has always been "Does that make sense? Let's pull this apart a bit and look at it." My 8yo daughter, despite having been taught the Catholic party line since birth, has applied her "Does that make sense?" measuring stick to the point that she is on her own suspecting that no gods exist. My 11yo son and my daughter are both on their own rejecting a lot of Christian doctrine "...because it doesn't make any sense!" They do, however, see enough sense in a service-oriented life to not reject it. (Not yet at any rate.)

 

I refuse to tell them any longer that they are supposed to Just Believe. I don't do that about other things without proof, such as unicorns or hobbits, so I won't do it with religious beliefs that have no factual grounding.

 

(Incidentally, I was coming to the exact. same. conclusions as a child--raised in a Baptist, then evangelical protestant home--but there was one key difference. My mother reacted with horror and insisted that I needed to Just Believe.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
I have always shown the kids that every religion deserves respect whether it's a personal belief of ours or not.
May I ask you a question? (Hopefully it won't derail this thread too much.)

 

Why do you believe that every religion deserves respect? Do they have to earn it, or is religion given special status that, say, theories in physics or biology or politics or TV shows or what constitutes a healthy diet or what is good parenting or is homeschooling good or bad for society, or...don't get?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm...can I hit that one? B/c I have to say, these board have influenced my answer.

 

When I talk to my kids about respecting others' religions, it is not because I am affording religions special status that frees them from the need to be credible (is that what you're asking?), but because religion is deeply personal. It is easy, particularly if one is part of a very dogmatic religion, has had bad experiences with religion in the past, or has come to the end of a difficult search, to be somewhat sanctimonious...to value one's own conclusions and faith over another's, even in the absence of any real knowledge about the other person's beliefs. I'm not saying we shouldn't argue about or discuss the tenets of various belief systems...only that it's important to me that my children approach each individual with the assumption that his or her religious beliefs are every bit as sustaining and important to them as ours are to us. Defensiveness and judgementalism derail authentic discussions about religion.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I talk to my kids about respecting others' religions, it is not because I am affording religions special status that frees them from the need to be credible (is that what you're asking?), but because religion is deeply personal. It is easy, particularly if one is part of a very dogmatic religion, has had bad experiences with religion in the past, or has come to the end of a difficult search, to be somewhat sanctimonious...to value one's own conclusions and faith over another's, even in the absence of any real knowledge about the other person's beliefs. I'm not saying we shouldn't argue about or discuss the tenets of various belief systems...only that it's important to me that my children approach each individual with the assumption that his or her religious beliefs are every bit as sustaining and important to them as ours are to us. Defensiveness and judgementalism derail authentic discussions about religion.

:iagree: I like how you worded this.. I'm trying to teach our kids about our family's mixed religious handbag, everything from my pagan/UU views to the grandparents' Catholic views. And as they get older, they will be free to choose for themselves what is personally "right" for themselves.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that, Saille, that really expresses what we try to teach our kids.

 

The term "teaching worldview" is something of an evangelical buzzword, as far as I can tell. It's not a term I use. I try to teach our kids truth as we understand it, and to teach them that we should respect other people and their beliefs.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Not entirely clear what you're asking, though; what constitutes intentional teaching of worldview? Are you referring to bringing children up as Pagans, or more to presenting other subjects through a Pagan lens? Or?

 

I mean providing direct instruction in the concept of a worldview, what it is, how it effects us (or maybe how it interacts with us), and asking the children to regularly look at what individuals and societies have done and do so the children can hook those actions up with the belief systems they would seem to match. So I don't mean bringing my children up as Pagans or presenting other subjects through a Pagan lens; I'd call that teaching religion.

 

So I know that all people have a worldview, including our children, and that parents influence it. I'd disagree about whether or not we all pass on our worldview to our kids but that question's a horse of a different color. I was really wondering something very academic, like, do you teach logic? Sure we all think, and a lot of people do it well, and yes we teach our children to do it everyday, but I mean a formal logic class: explaining what logic is, the laws of it. By intentional teaching I meant providing practicing looking at various things about worldview, without being spontaneous.

Edited by dragons in the flower bed
Link to post
Share on other sites
The term "teaching worldview" is something of an evangelical buzzword, as far as I can tell.

 

This seems to be the first bit of a nearly universal misunderstanding in the homeschool community. It's a buzzword but it's not an inherently evangelical concept. It's just another part of philosophy, in this case cognitive philosophy, and it's a part that was bound to emerge as global communication developed. Yes, the evangelical homeschoolers are using it, but I can see no good reason why anyone else shouldn't.

Edited by dragons in the flower bed
precision
Link to post
Share on other sites

It can seem hard trying to sort through the religiously biased 'world view' materials in an effort to share an unbiased view with our children. I am on that journey. I think that the term world view is from the fundamental Christian viewpoint. But, I do teach a world view to my children (in essence). We respect EVERYONE's belief. I try to teach them how others live with and without religion. I teach them how religion has been used politically throughout time. We try to skip the Christian materials as much as possible, however if a question is presented we do not avoid it. We learn from it. For one reason, every denomination (even if it is 'non-denominational') has their own world view. For another reason, I want my children to respect everyone's personal choice of their religion. I do not ever want my children to say that someone is wrong because they believe something different. I grew up judging others because they were not my religion. Since that time I have learned a lot and realize I only believed what I did because of the others around me. It is wrong and I truly regret it. I do not want my kids to learn through the minds of others. I want them to look at the world with an eye of mutual respect and awareness, not the view that they are wrong and I have to change them.

Sorry to ramble on - am I on the same question that you are asking?

Link to post
Share on other sites
May I ask you a question? (Hopefully it won't derail this thread too much.)

 

Why do you believe that every religion deserves respect? Do they have to earn it, or is religion given special status that, say, theories in physics or biology or politics or TV shows or what constitutes a healthy diet or what is good parenting or is homeschooling good or bad for society, or...don't get?

 

I respect the right of religion. I'm actually in awe of religion. I absolutely love when I encounter someone with a passion in their faith regardless of their faith. Their exuberance is uplifting. Not all of us have that. I haven't met too many people with religions other than Christianity, so my experience is limited. But even when we attended church, I taught my children to never, never judge and/or condemn someone for their own personal beliefs. I've encountered that nasty attitude from many people. It can turn a non-believer right off religion totally. My children don't believe in God but they know they don't have the right to tell someone else they are wrong when they believe differently. That is what I mean.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not saying we shouldn't argue about or discuss the tenets of various belief systems...only that it's important to me that my children approach each individual with the assumption that his or her religious beliefs are every bit as sustaining and important to them as ours are to us. Defensiveness and judgementalism derail authentic discussions about religion.

 

Bingo! You said it much better than I did. Thank you!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently made the argument that *all* literary criticism is really a look at an author's worldview. Are they a Christian? Are they a feminist? Why do they choose to use *this* word instead of *that* word? Why do they say *this*, which is not exactly true? What is it they want you to believe?

 

In my experience, the fundamentalist cc meaning of "worldview" is code for looking to dismiss other people's views if they do not agree with your own. So, I wouldn't use that word, but I understand if someone else chooses to co-opt, redefine and reclaim it. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am planning to put a bit more emphasis during this second history cycle that I'm starting with my daughter on looking at how the religious beliefs of a culture influenced/influences their actions and interpretations of others' actions. We touched on it in the first go round.

 

We are also embarking on setting up a series of comparative religion field trips for our homeschool group (so far we've been to the Hindu Center and the Quakers) and working on a Religions of the World badge for my Girl Scouts (if they choose to participate in the field trips). We are also Neopagan UU's, so she gets a fair amount of that sort of thing in religious education as well (and I'm having her work on the UU Religion in Life award for Girl Scouts this year).

 

Does that count as teaching worldview in an academic sense?:)

Link to post
Share on other sites
This seems to be the first bit of a nearly universal misunderstanding in the homeschool community. It's a buzzword but it's not an inherently evangelical concept. It's just another part of philosophy, in this case cognitive philosophy, and it's a part that was bound to emerge as global communication developed. Yes, the evangelical homeschoolers are using it, but I can see no good reason why anyone else shouldn't.

Well, I do realize that (I was an exchange student, a LOT of the support materials were all about that sort of thing). But while of course I will be teaching my kids about it, IME when people start talking about "teaching worldview" it means one particular evangelical thing that I'm not doing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wanted to share something. Our library has a set of kid-friendly DVDs on world religions. They are What is Religion? What is Hinduism? What is Islam? What is Buddhism? What is Christianity? and What is Judaism?

 

We have really enjoyed them.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I absolutely love when I encounter someone with a passion in their faith regardless of their faith. Their exuberance is uplifting.

 

I'm actually quite the opposite in that I love when I encounter someone who walks quietly and comfortably in their faith without feeling the need to shout it from the rooftops. Just shows that it takes all kinds, right? :001_smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have many discussions about all religions. I'm very careful to tell my boys what *I* believe and that it doesn't have to be what they believe. Just as they wouldn't be angry at me for my beliefs, so too can they not be angry/rude/disrespectful to others for their beliefs. I teach tolerance above all else.

We talk about how religion plays a role in how people are raised, the way they act, the actions they take and even the wars they wage.

I haven't found a text or curriculum that addresses these ideas. It's more like I utilize every opportunity to educate.

Link to post
Share on other sites

R, do you restrict the term "worldview" to religion, or extend it to culture, ethnicity, class, etc. as well?

 

When I consider worldview, one historical topic that lends itself as an example is the Crusades. If one states to one's child that the Crusades were a series of glorious campaigns by Roman Catholics to retake their rightful Holy Land, that would be one very specific and narrow perspective on that event. If, on the other hand, you and your child study events from the perspectives of a variety of historical figures, and discuss how even people on the same side may have had separate motivations for participating, that would be a more rounded attempt at focusing on worldview as historical motivator. I think that some of the recent discussions on historiography have also identified teachable moments WRT worldview. Does that sound like what you are talking about?

 

If, alternatively, you are talking about giving your children a pagan framework from within which they can view the world, then I do think I do that...more with UU than paganism. We view the world through a UU lens, we look for early UUs or spiritual "foreparents" in our history studies, and we probably pay more attention than others might to the role of dissenters and heretics in shaping history. One of the ways I plan to mitigate the concerns SWB has raised about the bloody nature of Modern history is by focusing on the role that conscientious folk played in protecting victims and standing for social justice throughout that period...journalists like Jacob Riis, musicians like Woody Guthrie, activists like Susan B. Anthony...is that the sort of thing you mean?

 

Sorry if my large edit causes confusion...

Edited by Saille
Link to post
Share on other sites
I mean providing direct instruction in the concept of a worldview, what it is, how it effects us (or maybe how it interacts with us), and asking the children to regularly look at what individuals and societies have done and do so the children can hook those actions up with the belief systems they would seem to match. So I don't mean bringing my children up as Pagans or presenting other subjects through a Pagan lens; I'd call that teaching religion.

 

So I know that all people have a worldview, including our children, and that parents influence it. I'd disagree about whether or not we all pass on our worldview to our kids but that question's a horse of a different color. I was really wondering something very academic, like, do you teach logic? Sure we all think, and a lot of people do it well, and yes we teach our children to do it everyday, but I mean a formal logic class: explaining what logic is, the laws of it. By intentional teaching I meant providing practicing looking at various things about worldview, without being spontaneous.

 

I get a feel for what you are asking, Rose, and I absolutely love it and have wondered about it myself. The whole "worldview" concept that Christians use has piqued my interest as to how we as "non Christians" might frame a worldview that is broad and inclusive yet allowing for opinions and personal perspectives. I think perhaps it is SUCH a large topic, though, that perhaps it would be difficult to have a definitive guide, so to speak. Although I guess I am talkign more about content that the "theory" or structure, which seems to be more like what you are asking.

I am researching university courses at the moment and in my local rather liberal university, it seems that they insist one takes electives that would give one a broad (er) worldview, no matter the course one takes. It seems to me that developing a wide worldview is something that universities take seriously.

I think I would prefer a "worldview" manual such as what you are looking for, rather than studying formal logic, personally.

 

 

 

I agree with you Rose, when I hear evangelicals use the term world view, I always think why does one group of people think they can own the term only for their beliefs. It is kind of like owning a god :)

 

Yes, exactly. But its up to us to "own" the term for ourselves so that they don't remain the only ones to define the term.

 

Like others, I try to teach worldview as we go, and I also try to be as . My own worldview always feels very limited by what I have read and come across, however. In fact, Susan Wise Bauer and also these boards have done a lot to form my worldview in many, many areas. But it all depends on what you are exposed to, who you are brought up by, the culture you are in, etc. I guess I try to help the kids realise that everyone does what they do for a reason, and it can help us udnerstand them better- whether its an individual or a culture or an event in history- if you can dig more deeply and see what motivated them.

 

Perhaps worldview in a secular sense could just be taught by framing our teaching of history, literature etc, a certain way. Why do these people act like this? What is their motivation? What is the culture, the times? Why did Hitler get to rise to power- what was the situation that allowed it to happen?

 

In a way, to me it is an extension of having compassion for everyone and the way they act/acted, by understanding the context of their lives.

 

The thing is....those who want their kids to have an ability to "regularly look at what individuals and societies have done and do so the children can hook those actions up with the belief systems they would seem to match" as a foundation for worldview- which I take as meaning, they want their kids to see things with context- already probably do this naturally as they teach. I do it to teh best of my ability because I have an interest in doing that.

And those who want to teach through a particular specific worldview, such as a Christian one, and see history through that filter, will do that.

 

Isnt gaining a healthy and broad worldview also just a part of being well educated? Just rambling.

Link to post
Share on other sites
It can seem hard trying to sort through the religiously biased 'world view' materials in an effort to share an unbiased view with our children. I am on that journey.

 

I'm sure I'll never be able to do that. My kids are getting my bias. I want them to know that, to be able to draw the lines from what I tell them to do with their breakfast dishes to what I believe about the role of humankind.

 

I think that the term world view is from the fundamental Christian viewpoint.

 

It's really not, I promise. I am not sure where to refer you on this because there are just too many references. Maybe David K. Naugle? Or... Immanuel Kant?

 

But, I do teach a world view to my children (in essence).

 

Okay, here's the difference in a nutshell: "I do teach a worldview to my children" vs "I do teach worldviews to my children." See? Of course we all do the first there, but we do not all do the second.

 

We try to skip the Christian materials as much as possible, however if a question is presented we do not avoid it. We learn from it.

 

I have wondered at times if David Quine's materials can be modified for my own use, but I just can't deal with that much Christianity in this particular area. It would be like trying to teach about Samhain using a tract.

 

For one reason, every denomination (even if it is 'non-denominational') has their own world view.

 

I don't think that's quite true. A worldview would have a few broad touchstones like original sin, and not likely be disturbed by a little thing like the divinity of the Pope. We could argue endlessly (and people do) what is a doctrine and what is a defining conceptualization of the nature of the universe, but, let's not do that here. Point is, a worldview is different from a religion and different from a sect.

 

 

Sorry to ramble on - am I on the same question that you are asking?

 

I hope I've clarified. Thank you for rambling on. :001_smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, I do realize that (I was an exchange student, a LOT of the support materials were all about that sort of thing). But while of course I will be teaching my kids about it, IME when people start talking about "teaching worldview" it means one particular evangelical thing that I'm not doing.

 

Yeah, this is true for me too. What term should we use if not "teaching worldview"? Or should we take the phrase back?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Perhaps worldview in a secular sense could just be taught by framing our teaching of history, literature etc, a certain way. Why do these people act like this? What is their motivation? What is the culture, the times? Why did Hitler get to rise to power- what was the situation that allowed it to happen?

 

In a way, to me it is an extension of having compassion for everyone and the way they act/acted, by understanding the context of their lives.

 

Yeah! That! That's what I am wanting to do, teach it in the context of history, like Truthquest does only maybe Compasssionquest or Understandingquest or even just Contextquest would be my program's title. Truthquest uses a "big three idea" model, doesn't it, to help kids sort out whether a worldview is biblical or not? Now, I want to help kids sort out what a worldview is, not whether it's biblical, and how it impacted the world. But I like the idea of having kids answer a set of questions about the cultures and people they study.

 

Looking at a book called The Decay and Restoration of Civilization (where a lot of this worldview stuff was first printed), I am pulling out the following questions:

 

What significance in the world has the society in which I live?

What significance in the world have I myself, or has an individual?

What do we want to do in the world?

What do we hope to get back from the world?

What is our duty to the world?

 

But I don't know that these are the ones I want to use. I realize that simple putting "world" there instead of something else -- nature, God, gods, universe, my fellow man, myself-- isn't quite fully honest.

 

David Quine, having studied this worldview stuff through a Christian lens and writing for a Christian audience, uses the following questions:

 

Is there a God or gods? If so, what is he or they like?

What is the nature of the universe-- it's origin and structure?

What is the essential nature of man?

What is the basis of morality and ethics?

What is the cause of evil and suffering?

What happens to man at death?

What is the meaning of history?

 

I kind of think I like these better, but they come from a Christian source. Thus my question, "Are any non-Christians teaching worldview? How are you doing this?" So are any of you doing something like the above? How?

Link to post
Share on other sites
I recently made the argument that *all* literary criticism is really a look at an author's worldview. Are they a Christian? Are they a feminist? Why do they choose to use *this* word instead of *that* word? Why do they say *this*, which is not exactly true? What is it they want you to believe?

 

That's a great point, and definitely something I feel more confident doing in literature than in history. I would also like to be able to connect what my kids are thinking about in literature with how the ideas in that literature are reflected in history and government, but I think at my kids' ages we need guiding baby step questions that are not as broad as, "So how does this idea influence the history that was made in this period?" That would be what I'm asking for here. Maybe I'm babying my kids too much and they will get this connection intuitively?

 

In my experience, the fundamentalist cc meaning of "worldview" is code for looking to dismiss other people's views if they do not agree with your own. So, I wouldn't use that word, but I understand if someone else chooses to co-opt, redefine and reclaim it. :)

 

*nods* I would like to reclaim it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Does that count as teaching worldview in an academic sense?:)

 

Yes, and those are all good ideas. Thanks. We too have touched on it in the first cycle and now I'm looking to go further in this new one. My only and always classically homeschooled kid is just now starting cycle two.

Link to post
Share on other sites
R, do you restrict the term "worldview" to religion, or extend it to culture, ethnicity, class, etc. as well?

 

I extend it.

 

 

 

Completely as an aside, this

 

One of the ways I plan to mitigate the concerns SWB has raised about the bloody nature of Modern history is by focusing on the role that conscientious folk played in protecting victims and standing for social justice throughout that period

 

makes me happy.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I mean providing direct instruction in the concept of a worldview, what it is, how it effects us (or maybe how it interacts with us), and asking the children to regularly look at what individuals and societies have done and do so the children can hook those actions up with the belief systems they would seem to match. So I don't mean bringing my children up as Pagans or presenting other subjects through a Pagan lens; I'd call that teaching religion.

 

So I know that all people have a worldview, including our children, and that parents influence it. I'd disagree about whether or not we all pass on our worldview to our kids but that question's a horse of a different color. I was really wondering something very academic, like, do you teach logic? Sure we all think, and a lot of people do it well, and yes we teach our children to do it everyday, but I mean a formal logic class: explaining what logic is, the laws of it. By intentional teaching I meant providing practicing looking at various things about worldview, without being spontaneous.

 

Oh my. I had not thought of teaching this in this way, as in identifying what a worldview is and learning how to determine what someone's worldview is and how it affects/affected their actions. I want to teach ds to have a critical view of history/politics/etc and this may be the best summary of how to do it I have come across. Thank goodness I found it now when I still have several years to process and prepare for it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What significance in the world has the society in which I live?

What significance in the world have I myself, or has an individual?

What do we want to do in the world?

What do we hope to get back from the world?

What is our duty to the world?

 

But I don't know that these are the ones I want to use. I realize that simple putting "world" there instead of something else -- nature, God, gods, universe, my fellow man, myself-- isn't quite fully honest.

 

David Quine, having studied this worldview stuff through a Christian lens and writing for a Christian audience, uses the following questions:

 

Is there a God or gods? If so, what is he or they like?

What is the nature of the universe-- it's origin and structure?

What is the essential nature of man?

What is the basis of morality and ethics?

What is the cause of evil and suffering?

What happens to man at death?

What is the meaning of history?

 

 

 

Arent those sort of questions called "Philosophy"?

I have this book : Philosophy for Kids

amazon.com/Philosophy-Kids-Questions-Wonder-Everything/dp/1882664701/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1277873752&sr=8-1

 

and it asks questions such as :

 

Are you a fair and just person?

Should you ever tell a lie?

Are there times when you should be violent?

Do we control our technology or does our technology control us?

Can you lie to yourself?

Can computers think?

Shoudl you always listen to the opinions of others?

Do two wrongs balance our and make an action right?

 

OK so these arent quite the same as what you are looking at, but this is the basic kids book- I notice there is an advanced version of the kids book, and a teenager version (Questioning Lifes Big Ideas)- the topics might extend more in the direction you are looking for.

 

At the least, the questions and discussions would give a context for extending that kind of questioning into history and other topics which come up.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Arent those sort of questions called "Philosophy"?

 

Yes, in that apples, pears and bananas are called "foods".

 

Quoting one of my favorite authors here:

 

"A worldview is [thus] more than a group of beliefs about the nature of the world. It is also a bridge between those scientific and metaphysical beliefs, and the ethical beliefs about what people can and should do in response to the world. It is the intellectual narrative in terms of which of the actions, choices and purposes of individuals make sense... A worldview can have a distinctive character and identity, just as a person does."

 

Worldview is the string between the philosophies we swim in and the actions we accomplish.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes, in that apples, pears and bananas are called "foods".

 

Quoting one of my favorite authors here:

 

"A worldview is [thus] more than a group of beliefs about the nature of the world. It is also a bridge between those scientific and metaphysical beliefs, and the ethical beliefs about what people can and should do in response to the world. It is the intellectual narrative in terms of which of the actions, choices and purposes of individuals make sense... A worldview can have a distinctive character and identity, just as a person does."

 

Worldview is the string between the philosophies we swim in and the actions we accomplish.

 

 

I get what you're defining here, Rose, but what throws me off is the bad taste left in my mouth by the way the word "worldview" is used by certain people.

 

I may be teaching a worldview by your definition, but I have never uttered that word around my child. Nor would I want him to use it to describe the philosophical lens through which he sees the world.

 

We do discuss with our son what we believe and how WE view the world, but I can't really describe what we are doing as teaching, in the sense that there is no specific intention to instruct him in any of it. Rather, we are engaging with him on issues and dialoguing our thoughts on the matter.

 

So, I'm afraid I'm not helping to answer your query. :sad:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Didn't read other post yet, but I did this when we were hsing. We wanted the kids to explore and form thoughts and opinions, and be able to make educated choices about what spiritual options they may want to pursue as young adults. They were about 9 and 12 when we did this.

 

The kids and I took an all day class from Terri at Knowledge Quest. Patty Johanna put it together, and it was full of info.

 

She covered all the different types of "theisms", etc. (I am having trouble remembering what all else was covered.), from a Christian point of view, but very open-minded-ly. It was a great jump-off point.

 

We then spent a year researching and exploring various religions: visiting different churches, talking to folks from all backgrounds,etc. We read tons of library books about world religions that we hadn't already covered or explored yet in the Story of the World, and read Genevieve Foster's book, Augustus Caesar's World. I know we used another text or two, but I cannot remember titles.

 

Visiting various places of worship and taking part in various rituals was very cool. Just off the top of my head.... we took part in pagan ceremonies (solstices, equinoxes, etc), went to a Catholic funeral, mass, and a way cool Latin choir performance. We visited a Buddhist temple, a synagogue, attended services at Presbyterian, Lutheran, Methodist, and Unitarian churches; we attended several different Unity "churches", and visited relatives who are Mennonite. I know there is more I am forgetting, but it was great fun, we learned tons, and we did it all through our family's own world view lense, and it was very much experiential learning. One of the homeschool "unit studies" I am the most proud of.

 

Speaking for myself, it was very informative and eye-opening for me, as I am on my own spiritual journey these last few years. Does that help?

Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, well I guess I would have to answer that we intend to. It's not quite happening yet, as they are still young and have only recently started to grasp the whole concept that not everyone is coming from the same place as it were. I get a lot of questions along the lines of "how could anyone possibly think/do x?", so yeah it's certainly something that we will get into more as they get older.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I get what you're defining here, Rose, but what throws me off is the bad taste left in my mouth by the way the word "worldview" is used by certain people.

 

I may be teaching a worldview by your definition, but I have never uttered that word around my child. Nor would I want him to use it to describe the philosophical lens through which he sees the world.

 

Just because of Francis Schaeffer? The author I quoted above was Brendan Cathbad Myers, a respectable Neo-Pagan thinker. I'm willing to be talked into the idea that there's something intrinsically wrong with the word "worldview," but so far I'm not there. I love hearing your mind, Audrey; please explain further.

Edited by dragons in the flower bed
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, my impression was that you were talking about explicitly teaching your children to parse/analyze historical situations/figures/events to see how worldviews affected the decisions made and the course of events. This is what I want to do. To me that is unrelated to teaching children one specific worldview. Actually, it would be more accurate to say that it is separate from teaching one specific worldview, and I would want to teach dc to recognize my/our/their worldview and how it colors my/our/their decisions as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just because of Francis Schaeffer? The author I quoted above was Brendan Cathbad Myers, a respectable Neo-Pagan thinker. I'm willing to be talked into the idea that there's something intrinsically wrong with the word "worldview," but so far I'm not there. I love hearing your mind, Audrey; please explain further.

 

 

Schaeffer is really only the start of it. If it was only Schaeffer using the term in that distasteful way, that would be easy enough to overlook. The fact is, however, that there is a whole (seemingly large, if only for their strident vocalness) segment of people who use the term in a way that is specifically meant to marginalize everyone not like themselves.

 

I dislike marginalization efforts of all kinds, and I do try to avoid giving credence to the terminology marginalizers use. I can appreciate the logic behind Mrs. Mungo's suggestion to re-claim the term, but that is not the route I could find myself taking.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Schaeffer is really only the start of it. If it was only Schaeffer using the term in that distasteful way, that would be easy enough to overlook.

 

I'm sorry, you're right. I didn't mean to offhandedly minimize either. I guess I do keep my head in the sand to a degree.

 

The fact is, however, that there is a whole (seemingly large, if only for their strident vocalness) segment of people who use the term in a way that is specifically meant to marginalize everyone not like themselves.

 

I can list off Sire, Quine and Schaeffer, "fundamentalist homeschoolers," and then my mind flows off into the non-Christian stuff I have read, from so many more sources than my mind cares to list that it feels like everywhere.

 

If we don't reclaim the term it will just go on meaning what the other guys say. If they're vocal, that form of it will expand into our culture. How can I sit by while my vocabulary is taken hostage?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just wanted to share something. Our library has a set of kid-friendly DVDs on world religions. They are What is Religion? What is Hinduism? What is Islam? What is Buddhism? What is Christianity? and What is Judaism?

 

We have really enjoyed them.

 

I think we watched these too. I liked them.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think I understand the "worldview" thing. I have only been homeschooling a short time and haven't delved in depth into some education philosophies.

 

I looked at the worldview website and I did see this essay.

 

http://www.thegreatbooks.com/essays/avoid.html

 

Which seems to be satire.

Edited by Sis
Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, that essay made my brain spin rather violently. Apparently, all work and no sleep makes it hard for Saille to wrap her head around watching the worldview snake eat its own tail.

 

Rose, looking at the posts since last night makes it fairly clear that I was wandering in circles by myself instead of answering you. However, although I would not perhaps have articulated it as succinctly as you do, much of my religious journey over the last several years has involved the realization that, as a member of a minority religion, I'd somehow moved from my Catholic upbringing and my family's (widely shared) worldview to the unspoken abdication of one. I don't know if I'm explaining that clearly. It's difficult to express. Recently, my sense has been that if there are folks out there teaching worldview so actively, I'd better focus myself, and frame and teach our family's worldview to our own children, lest we exclude ourselves from such discussions entirely. Embracing that concept has been very empowering for me, and has affected what I want out of my kids' RE program at church, as well.

 

Yes, I do teach worldview. It is integrated instruction at this point...even the kids' RE classes are more about story and principles than worldview, and how it plays out on the temporal plain. But I would say that it's a constant thread in our homeschooling and family lives, and we also model. The kids are with us or hear us discussing our participation in our wider communities, and will ask questions about things we discuss in front of them or things they overhear. That gives us an opportunity to place our actions in the context of our worldview. (Just don't ask me to articulate it above an elementary level this morning. :lol:)

 

Over the last year or two, I've seen them responding to this instruction by taking initiative and volunteering to do things at our church without being asked or prompted by anyone, including us. Some of the things they've offered to do would not have occurred to us. They've framed decisions in the context of an active belief system. I gather from them that they perceive a worldview as something they are responsible for developing and carrying out to the best of their ability.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Hmmm...can I hit that one? B/c I have to say, these board have influenced my answer.

 

When I talk to my kids about respecting others' religions, it is not because I am affording religions special status that frees them from the need to be credible (is that what you're asking?), but because religion is deeply personal. It is easy, particularly if one is part of a very dogmatic religion, has had bad experiences with religion in the past, or has come to the end of a difficult search, to be somewhat sanctimonious...to value one's own conclusions and faith over another's, even in the absence of any real knowledge about the other person's beliefs. I'm not saying we shouldn't argue about or discuss the tenets of various belief systems...only that it's important to me that my children approach each individual with the assumption that his or her religious beliefs are every bit as sustaining and important to them as ours are to us. Defensiveness and judgementalism derail authentic discussions about religion.

 

well spoken! :iagree:

Link to post
Share on other sites
This seems to be the first bit of a nearly universal misunderstanding in the homeschool community. It's a buzzword but it's not an inherently evangelical concept. It's just another part of philosophy, in this case cognitive philosophy, and it's a part that was bound to emerge as global communication developed. Yes, the evangelical homeschoolers are using it, but I can see no good reason why anyone else shouldn't.

 

 

We teach them the correct way to brush their teeth.

We teach them the corerct way to share toys.

We teach them the correct way to pronounce words.

We teach them the correct way to spell words.

We teach them the correct way to wash their hands.

We teach them the correct way to add numbers.

We teach them the correct way to cross the street.

We teach them the correct way to chew food (mouth closed, please).

We teach them the correct wasy to honor their parents . . . . .

 

Why do some folks think it's not correct to teach them how to think??????

Edited by dmmosher
Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...